26

I have just seen code that used if(!(a == b)) instead of the more commonly seen if(a != b) in C#. I am wondering if there is a difference between the two in C#?

  • 1
    What kind of difference are you looking for? – Bogdan Doicin May 14 at 18:04
  • Is your code example the actual code you saw? Because I don't know any developer that would trade != for an additional pair of parentheses unless the actual code is more complex than this. – Robert Harvey May 14 at 18:05
  • 1
    Careful with other languages, that's really broad. It's only sometimes the same in javascript. – Erik Philips May 14 at 18:06
  • Use ILSpy to decompile the IL for each instruction. Do you see a difference? – Amy May 14 at 18:06
  • 2
    The only diference is sanity of engineer who's gonna read if (!(a == b)) – rAndom69 May 14 at 18:13
37

In most cases, they're the same - but they don't have to be. != and == can be overloaded separately, with different logic. Here's an example:

using System;

class Test
{
    // All this code is awful. PURELY FOR DEMONSTRATION PURPOSES.
    public static bool operator==(Test lhs, Test rhs) => true;
    public static bool operator!=(Test lhs, Test rhs) => true;        
    public override bool Equals(object other) => true;
    public override int GetHashCode() => 0;

    static void Main()
    {
        Test a = null;
        Test b = null;
        Console.WriteLine(a != b);    // True
        Console.WriteLine(!(a == b)); // False
    }    
}

In the vast majority of cases, a != b and !(a == b) will have exactly the same behavior, and a != b is almost always clearer. But it's worth being aware that they can differ.

It can get even more pathological - a != b and !(a == b) may even have different types. For example:

using System;

class Test
{
    // All this code is awful. PURELY FOR DEMONSTRATION PURPOSES.
    public static Test operator==(Test lhs, Test rhs) => new Test();
    public static Test operator!=(Test lhs, Test rhs) => new Test();
    public static string operator!(Test lhs) => "Negated";
    public override string ToString() => "Not negated";

    public override bool Equals(object other) => true;
    public override int GetHashCode() => 0;

    static void Main()
    {
        Test a = null;
        Test b = null;
        Console.WriteLine(a != b);    // "Not negated"
        Console.WriteLine(!(a == b)); // "Negated"
    }    
}

Here a != b is of type Test, but !(a == b) is of type string. Yes, this is horrible and you're unlikely to run into it in real life - but it's the kind of thing a C# compiler needs to know about.

  • 8
    This is really speculative. – Robert Harvey May 14 at 18:07
  • 5
    Beat me by 54 seconds. – Eric Lippert May 14 at 18:08
  • 1
    But note worthy as an example of how one could figure out why something is working incorrectly (as in a developer overloaded one but not the other for class/object comparison). – Erik Philips May 14 at 18:08
  • 1
    @RobertHarvey: It's intended to indicate that as far as the language is concerned, the two expressions are different. They may behave the same way in almost all cases, but they're not the same thing. – Jon Skeet May 14 at 18:09
  • 6
    Almost 30 years since I learned OO programming and I still mix up "overloaded" and "overridden". :-) Thanks Jon! – Eric Lippert May 14 at 18:15
14

Sure there's a difference. If ! and == and != are overloaded, then the first calls the first two operators, and the second calls the third. Those are permitted to do very different things, though it would be foolish to do so.

In fact it is common to implement overloaded == and != operators in terms of each other; you might say bool operator !=(C x, C y) => !(x == y); for example. In that case, x != y would be an infinite recursion, which is plainly different than calling !(x == y)!

  • 6
    Who is this Jon Skeet guy? Always muddying the waters. Might have to have a chat with the elders about him. – NTDLS May 15 at 17:04
8

Logically and conceptually there's no difference, but, since the operators can be overloaded, implementationally there may be a difference.

This highlights a general point in coding though, that any method, operator, property, whatever, should aim to do exactly "what it says on the tin". There should ideally be no surprises, no inconsistent or unexpected behaviour hidden in the implementation.

protected by Robert Harvey May 14 at 18:14

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