3

I'm trying to find/determine if a String contains the character "-" that is not enclosed in round brackets "()".

I've tried the regex [^\(]*-[^\)]*, but it's not working.

Examples:

  1. 100 - 200 mg -> should match because the "-" is not enclosed in round brackets.
  2. 100 (+/-) units -> should NOT match
  • 4
    Um...it seems to be working for me... – Caleb H. May 14 at 22:52
  • I would just look for the simple match and check if non match found to evaluate it. For ex: \(.*-.*\) I would use this regex to match - within braces and check for the failure to match any expression as a positive in Java. Much easier and probably fool proof – Abhijith Nagarajan May 14 at 23:02
  • @CalebH. Pasting this code into RegExr, it looks like their regex doesn't work. I think the problem is the * quantifier that matches zero or more characters. This will match with the (+/-) example, since can be zero non-parenthesis characters next to the dash (as is the case on the right side). – Samantha Miller May 14 at 23:06
  • When I came to it, there wasn't a * at the end. – Caleb H. May 14 at 23:07
  • 1
    BTW, you don't need to escape brackets inside a character class. ie [^\(] is identical with [^(] – Bohemian May 15 at 0:01
2

Do you have to use regex? You could try just iterating over the string and keeping track of the scope like so:

public boolean HasScopedDash(String str)
{
    int scope = 0;
    boolean foundInScope = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++)
    {
        char c = str.charAt(i);
        if (c == '(')
            scope++;
        else if (c == '-')
            foundInScope = scope != 0;
        else if (c == ')' && scope > 0)
        {
            if (foundInScope)
                return true;
            scope--;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Edit: As mentioned in the comments, it might be desirable to exclude cases where the dash comes after an opening parenthesis but no closing parenthesis ever follows. (I.e. "abc(2-xyz") The above edited code accounts for this.

  • There is no guarantee of balanced or matched parenthesis. Therefore this won't work in cases which have no closure like asdf(sdf-afb . That's why you actually have to find the closure to test it. Bring in regex, that's what it does. – sln May 15 at 1:11
  • The OP didn't specify that that was a requirement. Depending on the situation it might even be desired that that case doesn't return true. – Chris May 15 at 1:20
  • "-" that is not enclosed in round brackets "()" So, you need to find closure. Can't assume closure. Either a(-)b and fail, or a(-b and pass. – sln May 15 at 14:46
  • Fair enough. I assumed the input string would've been cleansed/controlled. It'd be trivial to tweak the code to account for that though. I've updated my answer. – Chris May 15 at 22:58
  • Could also be something like int scope = 0; bool bHaveDash = false; for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) { char c = str.charAt(i); if (c == '(') scope++; else if (c == ')' && scope > 0) scope--; else if (c == '-') { if (scope == 0) return true; bHaveDash = true; } if (scope == 0) bHaveDash = false; } return bHaveDash; – sln May 15 at 23:53
1

Java supports quantified atomic groups, this works.
The way it works is to consume paired parenthesis and their contents,
and not giving anything back, up until it finds a dash -.
This is done via the atomic group constructs (?> ).

^(?>(?>\(.*?\))|[^-])*?-

https://www.regexplanet.com/share/index.html?share=yyyyd8n1dar
(click on the Java button, check the find() function column)

Readable

 ^ 
 (?>
      (?> \( .*? \) )
   |  
      [^-] 
 )*?
 -
1
Matcher m = Pattern.compile("\\([^()-]*-[^()]*\\)").matcher(s); return !m.find();

https://ideone.com/YXvuem

0

You might not to want to check for that to make this pass. Maybe, you could simply make a check on other boundaries. This expression for instance checks for spaces and numbers before and after the dash or any other chars in the middle you wish to have, which is much easier to modify:

([0-9]\s+[-]\s+[0-9])

It passes your first input and fails the undesired input. You could simply add other chars to its middle char list using logical ORs.

Demo

enter image description here

  • 1
    [-] is more simply written as -. – mickmackusa May 15 at 2:29
0

If you don't mind to check the string by using 2 regex instead of 1 complicated regex. You can try this instead

public static boolean match(String input) {
    Pattern p1 = Pattern.compile("\\-"); // match dash
    Pattern p2 = Pattern.compile("\\(.*\\-.*\\)"); // match dash within bracket

    Matcher m1 = p1.matcher(input);
    Matcher m2 = p2.matcher(input);

    if ( m1.find() && !m2.find() ) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

Test the string

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String input1 = "100 - 200 mg";
    String input2 = "100 (+/-) units";
    System.out.println(input1 + " : " + ( match(input1) ? "match" : "not match") );
    System.out.println(input2 + " : " + ( match(input2) ? "match" : "not match") );
}

The output will be

100 - 200 mg : match
100 (+/-) units : not match
  • This will work for what I'm trying to accomplish. Thank You!!1 – Tony May 15 at 20:15

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