1

I'm having a file in which some lines have some patterns like

M1/XX2/XX1 XX2/XX1/XX2/WCLKB XX2/XX1/XX2/P001  
M1/XX4/XX5 XX4/XX5/XX4/WCLKB XX4/XX5/XX4/P001

Here in some patterns XX2 is repeating. I need to change the above line to

M1/XX2/XX1 XX1/XX2/WCLKB XX1/XX2/P001
M1/XX4/XX5 XX5/XX4/WCLKB XX5/XX4/P001

These XX can vary XX[0..9] The code is in Perl.

I tried using some regex but was confused.

 open(FILE,$FilePath);
 @linesInFile = <FILE>;
 close(FILE);
 foreach $item(@linesInFile){
    if(grep(/^XX?\/XX.\/XX)
  #I dont know how to complete this 
}
2

If you're looking specifically for XXn/XXm/XXn/ (where n is the same number both times), you can use backreferences:

s{(XX[0-9]+/)(XX[0-9]+/\1)}{$2}g

Here \1 refers back to and matches the same string as the first capturing group, (XX[0-9]+/).

Live demo:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

while (my $line = readline DATA) {
    $line =~ s{(XX[0-9]+/)(XX[0-9]+/\1)}{$2}g;
    print $line;
}

__DATA__
M1/XX2/XX1 XX2/XX1/XX2/WCLKB XX2/XX1/XX2/P001
M1/XX4/XX5 XX4/XX5/XX4/WCLKB XX4/XX5/XX4/P001

Output:

M1/XX2/XX1 XX1/XX2/WCLKB XX1/XX2/P001
M1/XX4/XX5 XX5/XX4/WCLKB XX5/XX4/P001
  • We might also consider using \b word boundaries in our regexes! Anyway +1. – Allan May 15 at 7:54
  • Note that this changes ZXX1/XX2/XX1/b into ZXX2/XX1/b – ikegami May 15 at 7:56
2

If it's ok to blindly remove the first part:

while (<>) {
   s{ \K[^\s/]+/}{}g;
   print;
}

As a one-liner:

perl -pe's{ \K[^\s/]+/}{}g'

If you want to make sure it matches the pattern you specified:

while (<>) {
   s{(?<!\S)(XX\d)/(?=XX[^\s/]+/\1/\S)}{}ag;
   print;
}

As a one-liner:

perl -pe's{(?<!\S)(XX\d)/(?=XX[^\s/]+/\1/\S)}{}ag'

The key is \1, means which means "match what the first capture captured".

  • The first one matches every word that contains a slash (but does not start with a slash), and removes the part before (and including) the first slash. – melpomene May 15 at 7:53
  • @melpomene, Yes. That's what's meant by "blindly removing the first part". – ikegami May 15 at 8:05
0

Based on what you have explained in the description of your problem XX[0..9], the following perl command should do the trick:

Input:

$ cat input
M1/XX2/XX1 XX2/XX1/XX2/WCLKB XX2/XX1/XX2/P001  
M1/XX4/XX5 XX4/XX5/XX4/WCLKB XX4/XX5/XX4/P001

Command:

perl -pe 's@\bXX(\d)/XX(\d)/XX\1@XX$2/XX$1@g' input

Output:

M1/XX2/XX1 XX1/XX2/WCLKB XX1/XX2/P001  
M1/XX4/XX5 XX5/XX4/WCLKB XX5/XX4/P001
  • That should be $2 and $1 in the replacement part (see also perl -w). – melpomene May 15 at 7:42
  • Note that (by default) \d matches more than just [0-9]. It matches any Unicode character with the "digit" property. – melpomene May 15 at 7:47
  • @melpomene: thanks I have edited my answer accordingly. And indeed [0-9] might be safer in this contest. – Allan May 15 at 7:51
  • 1
    @melpomene, Re "Note that (by default) \d matches more than just [0-9].", Unless you use -CI (or equivalent) or use feature qw( unicode_strings ); (or equivalent) or /u (or equivalent), it won't. And it can easily be forced to match only 0-9 using /a. – ikegami May 15 at 8:01
  • @ikegami: thank you for picking this up! I have edited my answer by adding a positive lookbehind, thank you also for editing! The rest is a matter how we interpret the question – Allan May 15 at 8:04

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