0

I'm trying to check if a parameter is provided and passes a criteria, but seems verbose. This is what I have:

if (isset($request['limit']) && is_numeric($request['limit']) && (int)$request['limit'] > 0) {
    $post_params['posts_per_page'] = (int)$request['limit'];
}

I think it is safe, but is there a more concise way to achieve this while still remaining safe?

  • 1
    Function "empty"? – Amarnasan May 15 '19 at 11:13
  • 1
    is_numeric($request['limit']) is uselsess here – Zain Farooq May 15 '19 at 11:13
  • I suppose you could do if(intval($request['limit'] ?? 0) > 0) but it might respond differently to string inputs if they start with numbers. Not sure. – Niet the Dark Absol May 15 '19 at 11:14
  • @ZainFarooq but is (int)$request['limit'] > 0 still valid if it's not a int or will it die? – TruMan1 May 15 '19 at 11:14
  • 1
    It is already typecasting it to int. We dont need to check if its numeric or not – Zain Farooq May 15 '19 at 11:17
1

You can use preg_match and see if the first character is [1-9] then any digits.
This will not allow zero values or empty or strings.

You can add a ternary isset but shorter than that is out of my reach.

if(preg_match("/^[1-9]\d*$/", (isset($str) ? $str : 0))){
    // Something
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – deceze May 15 '19 at 12:45
  • OP explicitly does not want negative numbers… – deceze May 15 '19 at 12:46
  • I have not seen OP expressing that. But just remove the -? and it's all good then. – Andreas May 15 '19 at 12:53
  • "&& (int)$request['limit'] > 0" – deceze May 15 '19 at 12:56
  • @deceze I don't usually pay that much attention to OPs code, more what they explain they want. I recalled it as "not zero", but I see in title it says "greater than zero". My bad – Andreas May 15 '19 at 13:12
0

Use filter_input or filter_var

if (isset($request['limit']) {
    $var = filter_var($request['limit'], FILTER_VALIDATE_INT, ['min_range' => 0]);
    if ($var) {
       $post_params['posts_per_page'] = $var;
    }
}

But ideally you would be doing this when you generate your $request array.

$request = [
    'limit' => filter_input(INPUT_GET, 'limit', FILTER_VALIDATE_INT, ['min_range' => 0])
];
if ($request['limit']) {
    $post_params['posts_per_page'] = $var;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • @deceze Yeah the first part is not really any better. I like the second option much better. – Antony Thompson May 15 '19 at 11:35
-2

You can use

if (isset($request['limit']) and intval($request['limit']) > 0) {
    $post_params['posts_per_page'] = (int)$request['limit'];
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    I believe you could even omit the intval, as type juggling will take care of that already. – deceze May 15 '19 at 11:23
  • 2
    Passes 123rjt. So this does not apply. – nice_dev May 15 '19 at 11:24
  • 5
    Don't say "please use" please. Instead, explain what your answer does and why it works to resolve the OPs issue. They can then attempt to understand for themselves whether this helps for their case. – Adriaan May 15 '19 at 11:27
  • How is "You can use" a better explanation of why this works than "Please use"? Again: add explanation as to why this works Tell me why I need both these logical conditions to be larger than zero etc. Remember that you are not only answering to the OP, but also people who read this post years later in order to find out how to check whether a parameter exists and is greater than zero. They'll want to understand why this works. – Adriaan May 27 '19 at 17:34
-2

Not sure it you consider this a shorhand...

$correct = @(preg_match('/^[1-9]\d*$/', $request['limit']));

"@" will supress any warning in this sentence, but the only warning you can get there is that the variable is not defined, so it is controlled.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That by itself won't do much good, so it's a partial solution at best. – deceze May 15 '19 at 11:17
  • @deceze Won't do good? It is literally answering the question! – Amarnasan May 15 '19 at 11:18
  • 1
    if (!empty($foo)) will let 'abcdef' pass… – deceze May 15 '19 at 11:18
  • 4
    Yes, I downvoted this answer because it's not a solution, at the very least not a complete solution, to the question. What other criterion should I apply here? – deceze May 15 '19 at 11:22
  • 3
    Also empty(-2) will return false but OP needs to check that value is gt 0. – u_mulder May 15 '19 at 11:25

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