1

I want to match a name that has first letter capital followed by other alphabetical characters but no white space, so essentially a first name such as: Kevin.

I have the following as an attempt that doesn't seem to work:

pattern = "([A-Z]\w+)(^\s)"
1

You can simply bound your expression with an end $ char and that would suffice:

([A-Z][a-z]+)$

If you wish to add more boundary, you can also bound it with a start ^ char:

^([A-Z][a-z]+)$

You can also remove the capturing group, if you want, and it would still match.

[A-Z][a-z]+$

RegEx

You can modify/change your expressions in regex101.com.

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RegEx Circuit

You can visualize your expressions in jex.im:

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JavaScript Demo

const regex = /([A-Z][a-z]+)$/gm;
const str = `Kevin`;
const subst = `$1`;

// The substituted value will be contained in the result variable
const result = str.replace(regex, subst);

console.log('Substitution result: ', result);

1

I would use a variation of ([A-Z][a-z]+)$ used by Emma.

This RegEx will get the first name of each entry and will work even if the entry have only the first name.

The names will be separated by newline.

Regex test

0

EDIT: Updated to include any word character after initial capital letter.

Try a negative look ahead like this:

([A-Z]\w+\b(?!\s))

In the above example, \b looks for the word boundary at the end and (?!\s) will fail the regex if it finds a space. The main difference between this and the accepted answer is that it will also pick up newlines and fail when the multi-line flag is set.

As always, it depends on your use case.

Working example:

const matchName = /([A-Z]\w+\b(?!\s))/
console.log(matchName.test("kevin")) // false
console.log(matchName.test("Kevin")) // true
console.log(matchName.test("Kevin ")) // false
console.log(matchName.test("KeVin")) // true
console.log(matchName.test("Kevin\n")) // false

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