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I'm trying to parallelize my program, but since I'm very new to threads, I'm facing some problems.

I have two methods which are part of the same class. One of the methods does some calculations in a for loop and pushes the results in a vector, other method (runTheResult) takes the vector and launches a thread using the obtained vector. I wish to launch another thread for running the next obtained result every time runTheResult is done with a result while limiting the maximum number of threads at a time to 4.

The structure of my program is like:

void runTheResult(vector<double>& u){

//process 'u' and launch a thread 


};

void method(){

for(...){

//calculate

    for(...){

    //put the calculations in vector<double>result

    };

    runTheResult(result); 

};

};

I've googled about this a lot and one of the solutions is to maintain a message que. The problem with this, however, is if I implement a que, I'll have to check the que with another thread periodically in a while loop. If I use while loop like while(true){//check for new messages if number of threads is less than five}, I'll lose a lot of processing power and if I choose to put the loop to sleep if condition is not met, I waste processing power. The functions I'm running in threads take 2-5 seconds each and I've to process ~1k to 50k of them so even a second of delay per loop is a lot.

Is it possible to run runTheResultin another thread every time runTheResult is done? or is there better way to do this?

  • 1
    You can have the other thread waiting for a condition variable and awake on that, then execute the function you want based on some flags you will have set. In Windows, you can also have a message queue and post a message (not the for loop you have created, but GetMessage()). For simple multithreading calculations you can also use future/promise. – Michael Chourdakis May 15 at 16:02
  • Create 4 threads and let them wait for a condition variable. Every time you have work ready for one of the threads, call notify_one. – super May 15 at 16:13
  • @MichaelChourdakis If i check for the flags, I'll still have to use while loop though, right? If you don't mind, could you elaborate please more? – hmmmmmm May 15 at 16:13
  • The point is that, by using these "waiting" objects, the for loop won't consume system resources. If you wait on the condition variable, then while waiting the thread won't eat the CPU. You will do a for loop, but inside that you would be checking for the condition variable, and if it's set, then check the flags. – Michael Chourdakis May 15 at 16:14
  • Some more info in one of my older articles here. – Michael Chourdakis May 15 at 16:16
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Others are telling you to use message queue because that's the safest way to do it. Your program must have at least a main thread that the user(you or end-user) can interact with. This main thread will be looping for as long as your program runs. You do your message processing here

// this is not actually running the result now
// this only sends it to the main thread that will run the result
void runTheResult(vector<double>& u){ 

    //process 'u' and launch a thread. 
    // @NOTE Launching a thread again will not be beneficial as it will still be blocked 
    // by the mutex

    // convert/store vector into Message. To make it usable for other types
    // or you can just change Message to double
    Message u_message = to_message(u)

    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(message_mutex);
    messages_shared.append(u_message);

};

void method() // runs on worker thread
{
    for(...){

    //put the calculations in vector<double>result

    };

    runTheResult(result);
}

void getMessages_safe(std::vector<Messages>& outMessages_safe)
{
    // as Ted Lyngo suggests, using lock_guard is best practice. See edit for alternative
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(message_mutex);
    outMessages_safe = messages_shared;
    messages_shared.clear();
}

std::vector<Message> messages_shared;
std::mutex message_mutex;

void main() { // this runs on the very first thread of the program
  while (isProgramRunning)
  {
      std::vector<Message> messages_safe; // safe to access by this thread only
      getMessages_safe(messages_safe);

      // dispatch messages to whoever needs it

      // launch worker thread
  }
}

  • 1
    Why not use a proper guard for the mutex? If messages_shared.append() throws, the mutex will be locked forever if you do like above. std::lock_guard<std::mutex> guard(message_mutex); messages_shared.append(u_message); and then you don't need to manually unlock it. It also looks like noone is waiting for a condition variable so at least one thread will be spinning like crazy. – Ted Lyngmo May 15 at 16:59
  • That's true. But as it's not the main topic of the question. I used the most explicit way to use mutex, because I don't know if the op knows about it. – Israel dela Cruz May 15 at 17:02
  • 1
    OP seemed pretty concerned about performance so wasting a processor on spinning when it could be doing other things (like tending to the OS) won't do well. Also, lock guards and condition variables is almost a must when dealing with threads so I'm sure OP will pick up on what they are good for if you bring them into your example. – Ted Lyngmo May 15 at 17:11
  • I've edited my answer to use lock_guard. But I can't think of a way to implement conditional variable without making the program a single execution program with no way of starting up new threads later on. – Israel dela Cruz May 15 at 18:01
  • Good. About condition_variables When someone puts a message in messages_shared it could notify_one and the main thread could wait on that instead of trying to fetch messages that aren't there over and over again. – Ted Lyngmo May 15 at 18:07

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