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I've arrived at a point where I have to use GraphQL in a SQL-esque way to pull data en-masse (I wish it weren't so), and I also need to use a canned query called fooQuery that I cannot edit to extract the data.

Having looked at other answers here and here, I wrote a python script to generate a big ugly superquery from a list of unique ids that looks like this:

{
  query155051: fooQuery(id: 155051) {
    ... details
  }
  query414989: fooQuery(id: 414989) {
    ... details
  }
  .
  .
  .
  query265014: fooQuery(id: 265014) {
    ... details
  }
}

fragment details on fooQuery {
  categories {
    id
    name
    }
  }
}

Where the three lines of dots represent thousands of analogous subqueries. The db does fine for up to ~30 such subqueries, but it fails with any more. I have no idea why.

My question is then this – is there a better way to batch thousands of queries in a single query, or should I just break up the thousands into many superqueries of ~30 subqueries?

  • 1
    This is really a schema design issue. At that volume, a client should be able to submit an array of ids as an argument and get an array of results back, rather than being expected to generate a separate query per id. That would also make it easier to aggregate those ids into a single DB request rather than submitting one per fooQuery, which is probably what's happening now. – Daniel Rearden May 15 at 17:41
  • Alas, the schema is another thing that I have no control over. Would you then just recommend batching? – yungblud May 15 at 17:53
  • Yeah, that's really unfortunate :( Are you using a particular client to send these requests to the server (i.e. Relay, Apollo, etc.)? – Daniel Rearden May 15 at 18:02
  • GraphiQL, god help me – yungblud May 15 at 18:18

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