1

I have this attribute:

public class ValidateCertAttribute : AuthorizationFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnAuthorization(HttpActionContext context)
    {
        // Read certificate from the HTTP Request and
        // check its various attributes against known
        // values from a config file.
        if (true) // certificate is invalid
        {
            context.Response = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.Forbidden)
            {
                ReasonPhrase = "Invalid certificate"
            };
        }
        else
        {
            base.OnAuthorization(context);
        }
    }
}

and this action:

[HttpGet]
[Route("TestAuth")]
[ValidateCert]
public HttpResponseMessage TestAuth()
{
    return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK)
    {
        ReasonPhrase = "In Test method without any authorization."
    };
}

This action is inside a .NET Core Web Api controller:

[ApiController]
public class TestAuthController : ControllerBase

On the other hand, Startup.cs contains:

app.UseMvc();

so that seems odd, since this should just be a Web Api controlller, and not an MVC web application. Apparently, though, that's just for routing, but I thought it was worth mentioning.

I've set a breakpoint on the first line of the attribute code, but it's not getting hit. I believe it should get hit before the action executes and that the action should never execute because I'm setting the Response inside the attribute. Why isn't the attribute executing?

  • Try inheriting from the AuthorizeAttribute class and make sure it's the one in the System.Web.Http namespace. – JuanR May 15 at 18:26
  • @JuanR That didn't seem to make any difference. – birdus May 15 at 18:37
  • Are you sure your action is being executed at all? – JuanR May 15 at 18:54
  • Yes. Execution does stop at a breakpoint in the action. Good question! – birdus May 15 at 19:03
1

This can be accomplished using policy-based authorization.

The idea essentially is that you have a requirement that needs to be met (valid certificate), a handler for the requirement (how to validate the certificate) and a policy that enforces this requirement and is applied during authorization.

If your code is simple enough, you can just provide a Func<AuthorizationHandlerContext, bool> to the policy that is applied for evaluation. Here is how to setup the policy (in Startup.cs, ConfigureServices()):

services.AddAuthorization(options =>
{
    options.AddPolicy("ValidateCertificate", policy =>
       policy.RequireAssertion(context => 
       {
           var filterContext = (AuthorizationFilterContext)context.Resource;
           var Response = filterContext.HttpContext.Response;
           var message = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes("Invalid certificate");
           Response.OnStarting(async () =>
           {
               filterContext.HttpContext.Response.StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.Forbidden;
               await Response.Body.WriteAsync(message, 0, message.Length);
           });                       
           return false;
       }));
});

This will do what you want.

Now, if you want to go the more structured route, you can implement each piece:

First, create your requirement (more like a marker for reference, really):

public class ValidCertificateRequirement : IAuthorizationRequirement
{

}

Then setup the policy that needs to be applied (Startup.cs, ConfigureServices()):

services.AddAuthorization(options => 
{
    options.AddPolicy("ValidateCertificate", policy => 
    {
        policy.Requirements.Add(new ValidCertificateRequirement());
    });
});

Now you need to create your requirement handler:

public class ValidCertificateHandler : AuthorizationHandler<ValidCertificateRequirement>
{
    public ValidCertificateHandler()
    {
    }

    protected override Task HandleRequirementAsync(AuthorizationHandlerContext context, ValidCertificateRequirement requirement)
    {
        var filterContext = (AuthorizationFilterContext)context.Resource;
        var Response = filterContext.HttpContext.Response;
        var message = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes("Invalid certificate");
        Response.OnStarting(async () =>
        {
            filterContext.HttpContext.Response.StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.Forbidden;
            await Response.Body.WriteAsync(message, 0, message.Length);
        });
        context.Fail();
        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }
}

The handler then needs to be registered on startup (in ConfigureServices()):

//Register handler
services.AddSingleton<IAuthorizationHandler, ValidCertificateHandler>();

Lastly, for either approach (assertion or implementation), apply the Authorize attribute to your actions, indicating the policy to apply:

[Authorize(Policy = "ValidateCertificate")]
public HttpResponseMessage TestAuth()
{
    return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK)
    {
        ReasonPhrase = "In Test method without any authorization."
    };
}

You can read more about it here:

Policy-based authorization in ASP.NET Core

  • Unfortunately, that didn't make any difference. – birdus May 15 at 21:11
  • By the way, conventional routing isn't even set up, so the attribute route that I have on the action in question must be the one being used. So, that satisfies the documentation that you mentioned (apparently). – birdus May 15 at 21:16
  • @birdus: Are you setting the compatibility of the Mvc service? services.AddMvc() .SetCompatibilityVersion(CompatibilityVersion.Version_2_2); This is required if using the ApiController attribute. – JuanR May 15 at 21:19
  • Yes. It was there upon project creation. – birdus May 15 at 21:36
  • 1
    Yes, but if you look at the raw response, you will see that the code returned is the right one. You asked about Authorization and this answers that part. Since what you are validating is the certificate, I imagine you may want to implement this in the authentication scheme instead. Check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/47324129/… – JuanR May 16 at 20:58

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