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I am issuing a python commandline call from my PHP web application to perform some sympy analytics (then I parse back the sympy output).

These calls take a long time, but I think it is more the python startup and code parsing/compilation that takes a lot of time, not the solution of the system of inequalities itself.

The thing is that my program changes with every call: I always solve a different system of inequalities. There is no static structure so that I could import only e.g. the coefficients of a LSE. It's a system of varying size and structure. So (I think), I can't use pyc files.

Here are two exemplary calls:

/usr/bin/python -c "from sympy import Intersection; from sympy import solveset; from sympy import S; from sympy.abc import x; from sympy.functions.elementary.miscellaneous import Min, Max; print Intersection(*[solveset(p, x, S.Reals) for p in [(x > 4.0000), (x < 6.0000)]])" 2>&1


/usr/bin/python -c "from sympy import Intersection; from sympy import solveset; from sympy import S; from sympy.abc import x; from sympy.functions.elementary.miscellaneous import Min, Max; print Intersection(*[solveset(p, x, S.Reals) for p in [(x > 4.0000), (x < 6.0000), (((x) * 4.0000 + 5.0000) > 5.0000)]])" 2>&1

The system of inequalities can become large, and differs all the time. Here is one with nonlinear expressions:

/usr/bin/python -c "from sympy import Intersection; from sympy import solveset; from sympy import S; from sympy.abc import x; from sympy.functions.elementary.miscellaneous import Min, Max; print Intersection(*[solveset(p, x, S.Reals) for p in [(x > 4.0000), (x < 6.0000), ((x * (Min(Max(x, 4.0000), 5.0000))) > 7.0000), ((Min(Max(x, 4.0000), 5.0000)) > 5.0000)]])" 2>&1

Are there any commandline options or configuration settings that could speed these programs up?

Maybe I can precompile the sympy imports?

Edit: Is there maybe a python mode that would daemonize python that waits for my requests with imported sympy libs? Then I'd only "send" the print Intersection(...) command to it?

Edit 2:

Thanks to one answer, I tried out the pypy package. But unfortunately I cannot report an improved run time. With standard python 2.7 I get:

# time /usr/bin/python -c "from sympy import Intersection; from sympy import solveset; from sympy import S; from sympy.abc import x; from sympy.functions.elementary.miscellaneous import Min, Max; print Intersection(*[solveset(p, x, S.Reals) for p in [(x > 4.0000), (x < 6.0000), ((x * (Min(Max(x, 4.0000), 5.0000))) > 7.0000), ((Min(Max(x, 4.0000), 5.0000)) > 5.0000)]])"
EmptySet()

real    0m3.080s
user    0m2.920s
sys 0m0.050s

With pypy I have:

# time pypy -c "from sympy import Intersection; from sympy import solveset; from sympy import S; from sympy.abc import x; from sympy.functions.elementary.miscellaneous import Min, Max; print Intersection(*[solveset(p, x, S.Reals) for p in [(x > 4.0000), (x < 6.0000), ((x * (Min(Max(x, 4.0000), 5.0000))) > 7.0000), ((Min(Max(x, 4.0000), 5.0000)) > 5.0000)]])"
EmptySet()

real    0m6.816s
user    0m6.660s
sys 0m0.080s
2

SymPy is slow at starting up but not that slow. The slowness you see is just that your particular approach is slow under SymPy. You can make it a little faster for your examples by using ints instead of floats.

The majority of the time is spent in solveset which seems unnecessary for many of your simple relations. For example there's no point calling solveset with x<4 when you can just use as_set

In [7]: (x<4).as_set()                                                                                                            
Out[7]: (-∞, 4)

You can also rewrite your other conditions into a more straight-forward form e.g.

In [11]: piecewise_fold(Min(Max(x, 4.0000), 5.0000).rewrite(Piecewise))                                                           
Out[11]: 
⎧5.0  for x ≥ 5.0
⎪                
⎨4.0  for x ≤ 4.0
⎪                
⎩ x    otherwise 

I think you could put together a more efficient solver that handles that case than solveset. I suggest to make a function that is more efficient than can efficiently dispatch simple cases like x<4 and calls solveset only in more complicated cases.

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There are many ways to speed up Python programs. The recommended way is to optimize your algorithm and code (try python -m cProfile yourfile.py), and the simplest is using PyPy (JIT compiler for long running code). Other options include Shed Skin (static compiler using C++), Numba (static compiler using decorators and LLVM), Cython (static compiler using types and C(++), recommended), and Nuitka.

In your case at least putting the command line code into a .py file and running python -m compileall . to compile that to .pyc bytecode makes the parsing step faster, but that's negligible to using a static compiler to skip the interpreter altogether.

If you're making a REST API, the Falcon framework is one of the fastest Python FastCGI servers according to this benchmark; here's a little SymPy REST API server demo project.

4
  • Thanks for your very valuable answer, I worked on it and edited my question...#
    – olidem
    May 20 '19 at 16:55
  • Compiling to bytecode is no option for me as I create the actual code on-the-fly all the time.
    – olidem
    May 20 '19 at 17:00
  • Running that Falcon server in PyPy should eventually compile your SymPy functions. May 21 '19 at 8:38
  • Though unfortunately the example queries aren't well-suited to PyPy. Jun 13 '19 at 16:39

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