93

I want to delete drugName from the response but it is not happening any idea how to delete property from spread operator ? main.js

  const transformedResponse = transformResponse(response);
  const loggerResponse = {...transformedResponse};
  delete loggerResponse[drugName];
  console.log("LOGGER>>>>", loggerResponse);
  logger().info('Drug Price Response=', { ...loggerResponse, memberId: memberId, pharmacyId: pharmacyId });

\ data

LOGGER>>>> {
    '0': {
        isBrand: false,
        drugName: 'test drug',
        drugStrength: '5 mg 1 5 mg',
        drugForm: 'Tablet',
    }
}

transformResponse

[{
    drugName: 'HYDROCODONE-HOMATROPINE MBR',
    drugStrength: '5MG-1.5MG',
    drugForm: 'TABLET',
    brand: false
}]
8
  • There is no drugName variable in your code. If you want to remove drugName, then delete loggerResponse.drugName?
    – adiga
    May 15, 2019 at 18:52
  • @adiga i tried that it did not remove i added the data how it is coming from service
    – hussain
    May 15, 2019 at 18:55
  • 1
    Please post a sample of transformedResponse. Is it an array? Because, there is a 0 key in loggerResponse
    – adiga
    May 15, 2019 at 18:56
  • @adiga yes it is an array i added to the question
    – hussain
    May 15, 2019 at 19:00
  • What is your expected output? Will transformedResponse always have one item?
    – adiga
    May 15, 2019 at 19:00

9 Answers 9

164

You could use Rest syntax in Object Destructuring to get all the properties except drugName to a rest variable like this:

const transformedResponse = [{
    drugName: 'HYDROCODONE-HOMATROPINE MBR',
    drugStrength: '5MG-1.5MG',
    drugForm: 'TABLET',
    brand: false
},
{
    drugName: 'HYDROCODONE ABC',
    drugStrength: '10MG',
    drugForm: 'SYRUP',
    brand: true
}]

const output = transformedResponse.map(({ drugName, ...rest }) => rest)

console.log(output)

Also, when you spread an array inside {}, you get an object with indices of the array as key and the values of array as value. This is why you get an object with 0 as key in loggerResponse:

const array = [{ id: 1 }, { id: 2 }]
console.log({ ...array })

10
  • I think "rest pattern" is a useful way to distinguish ...rest as it is used here from "rest parameters" and "spread arguments". Nice and clean answer.
    – Mulan
    May 15, 2019 at 19:58
  • @adiga is it possibel to destruct multiple properties like {drugName,drugForm, ...rest} , i tried it its only remving drugName
    – hussain
    May 15, 2019 at 20:43
  • @hussain that should work: transformedResponse.map(({ drugName, drugForm, ...rest }) => rest) Check the casing of properties.
    – adiga
    May 15, 2019 at 20:55
  • ` "drugPrice": [ { "isBrand": true, "drugName": "Lipitor", "drugStrength": "80 mg", "drugForm": "Tablet", "mailPrice": { "copayEmployer": 0}}]` ok i was trying to delete mailPrice.copayEmployer actually and that is not being deleted it is nested object
    – hussain
    May 15, 2019 at 21:02
  • @hussain for that, you'd have to destructure the nested property separately. Like this: jsfiddle.net/adigas/c8n2fu4a/1. You can destructure the parameter itself, or, If it is too confusing, you can take separate variables inside map
    – adiga
    May 16, 2019 at 6:27
87

1 line solution using ES9 Object Rest Operator

const loggerResponse = {
  "0": {
    isBrand: false,
    drugName: "test drug",
    drugStrength: "5 mg 1 5 mg",
    drugForm: "Tablet",
  },
};
const { drugName, ...newResponse } = loggerResponse["0"];
console.log(newResponse);

3
  • 5
    upvote for one liner and teaching me something new, thanks!
    – timelfelt
    Sep 8, 2020 at 20:37
  • 1
    is there a way to do this inside another object ? Dec 9, 2020 at 15:42
  • 7
    Problem with this is linting, in our project at work the project fails to build given I'm not using drugName Mar 28, 2022 at 23:09
37

const myObject = {
  a: 1,
  b: 2,
  c: 3
};
const {
  b,
  ...noB // assigns remaining keys to a new `noB` object
} = myObject;
console.log(noB); // => { a: 1, c: 3 }

6
  • 1
    It would help if you would explain shy your code would solve this issue. In other words add some comments so we can understand what your code does...
    – Klaassiek
    Apr 18, 2021 at 13:51
  • 1
    it is only a few line js code. i think it doesn't need any explain. Just should try. Apr 26, 2021 at 20:12
  • @Klaasiek - pretty straight forward - he destructures the original object into two objects: one containing the unwanted key, and one containing the remaining keys. Then, he uses the one containing the remaining keys. pretty concise code.
    – mac
    Jun 24, 2021 at 15:31
  • 2
    Shouldn't it be named noB?
    – m4heshd
    Sep 24, 2021 at 7:19
  • Keep in mind, due to the wild fun of JavaScript, that this won't do a deep copy. Meaning if you use this method, and myObject gets a mutation (e.g. a sub-object such as myObject.d.moreStuff changes later), the noB object would be changed also. Lodash's omit may have a way around it (and if it doesn't you could use a lodash cloneDeep beforehand to mitigate). Buyer beware :)
    – ryanm
    Oct 20, 2021 at 19:55
30

Another option is to write a generic function, removeKey -

const removeKey = (k, { [k]:_, ...o }) =>
  o

const values =
  [ { a: 1, x: 1 }
  , { a: 1, y: 1 }
  , { a: 1, z: 1 }
  ]

console .log (values .map (v => removeKey ("a", v)))
// [ { x: 1 }, { y: 1 }, { z: 1 } ]

The function can be easily adapted to remove multiple keys, if necessary -

const removeKey = (k = "", { [k]:_, ...o } = {}) =>
  o

const removeKeys = (keys = [], o = {}) =>
  keys .reduce ((r, k) => removeKey (k, r), o)

const values =
  [ { a: 1, x: 1 }
  , { a: 1, y: 1 }
  , { a: 1, z: 1 }
  ]

console .log (values .map (v => removeKeys (['a', 'z'], v)))
// [ { x: 1 }, { y: 1 }, {} ]

2
  • Amazing answer, wish I could upvote more than once.
    – Aaron
    Jun 27, 2020 at 2:20
  • Thanks, removeKey is short and usable for removing variable keys
    – fingerpich
    Oct 27, 2021 at 23:45
12

Another one line solution will be,

return {...(delete obj.del && obj)} 
4
  • 1
    I like this because of the "delete" keyword, it's not doing weird javascript mysterious syntax stuff.
    – K0D4
    Apr 21, 2022 at 15:46
  • 3
    The only problem to be aware of with this is that if you passed obj as a parameter to the function, upon return that property will be deleted for the caller as well. You'd have to make a copy of obj first and then delete from the copy to solve this issue: let copy = {...obj}; delete copy.del; return {...copy};
    – Malvineous
    May 11, 2022 at 9:35
  • 1
    @Malvineous, curious, why also spread the return?
    – Jasman
    Aug 19, 2022 at 21:04
  • That was just meant as a placeholder so you could add additional properties as the OP was doing: return {...copy, extraValue: 'example'};. If you are not adding extra values then return copy; would be fine, or you could add your extra values in the let copy assignment instead. Sorry for the confusion, it is a bit unnecessary having two spread operators there.
    – Malvineous
    Aug 20, 2022 at 3:10
8

This is the most succinct and immutable way that I've found. You simply destructure the object into two parts: one part is the property you're trying to remove (drugName in this case), and the other part is the rest of the object, that you want to keep (drugWithoutName in this case).

Once you've done that, you can abandon the property that has been removed, abandon the original object, and use the new object (drugWithoutName in this case) that has all of the remaining fields.

Coming up with the syntax isn't obvious, but it makes sense once you see it:

const response = [{
    drugName: 'HYDROCODONE-HOMATROPINE MBR',
    drugStrength: '5MG-1.5MG',
    drugForm: 'TABLET',
    brand: false
}]

console.log("response", response)

const removeNamesFromResponse = (response) => {
  return response.map(drug => {
    const { drugName, ...drugWithoutName } = drug
    return drugWithoutName
  })
}

const responseWithoutNames = removeNamesFromResponse(response)

console.log("responseWithoutNames", responseWithoutNames)

These articles explain the concept further:

https://codeburst.io/use-es2015-object-rest-operator-to-omit-properties-38a3ecffe90

https://github.com/airbnb/javascript/blob/master/README.md#objects--rest-spread

2
  • 1
    Except linting fails because drugName is never referenced Mar 28, 2022 at 23:11
  • @StephenYork This is a part of a larger app. If drugName makes your linting fail because it's unused in your use case, you should be able to use some name like _ that is acceptable to the linter as a name for a variable that is intentionally unused. Mar 29, 2022 at 4:59
3

You can use the spread operator and simply assigning undefined to the key you don't want:

const transformedResponse = [{
drugName: 'HYDROCODONE-HOMATROPINE MBR',
drugStrength: '5MG-1.5MG',
drugForm: 'TABLET',
brand: false
}];

const output = transformedResponse.map((response) => ({
  ...response,
  drugName: undefined
}))

console.log(output);

1
  • Close but not quite there, HEADS UP!, if we use if(drugname in output) will result true, you need to compare the VALUE, drugName key will still exist!
    – rickvian
    Jul 30, 2021 at 7:07
0

If you have property drugName in every object of transformedResponse array you can use Array.map() to generate a new array without drugName property:

Example:

const transformedResponse = [
  {
    drugName: 'HYDROCODONE-HOMATROPINE MBR',
    drugStrength: '5MG-1.5MG',
    drugForm: 'TABLET',
    brand: false
  },
  {
    drugName: 'TEST',
    drugStrength: '7MG-1.9MG',
    drugForm: 'TABLET',
    brand: false
  }
];

const loggerResponse = transformedResponse.map(o =>
{
    let clone = Object.assign({}, o);
    return (delete clone.drugName, clone);
});

console.log(loggerResponse);
.as-console {background-color:black !important; color:lime;}
.as-console-wrapper {max-height:100% !important; top:0;}

0

Problem with this is linting, in our project at work the project fails to build given I'm not using drugNamestrong text

/eslint no-unused-vars: ["error", { "ignoreRestSiblings": true }]/ // 'drugName' is ignored because it has a rest property sibling.

const output = transformedResponse.map(({ drugName, ...rest }) => rest)

console.log(output) Ref

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