0

I'm extending an existing bunch of Sequelize code, using an INNER JOIN between users and a user_group_access tables, which contains the relational ACL-type data that I need to use with CASL:

const User = sequelize.define('users', {
  user_id: {
    type: Sequelize.INTEGER,
    primaryKey: true,
    autoIncrement: true,
  },
  email: {
    type: Sequelize.STRING
  },
}, {
  timestamps: false
}, {
  classMethods: {
    associate: function(models) {
      User.hasOne(models.UserGroupAccess, { foreignKey: 'user_id' } );
    }
  },
  instanceMethods: {

  }
}, {
  underscored: true
});

... and:

const UserGroupAccess = sequelize.define('user_group_access', {
  id: {
    type: Sequelize.INTEGER,
    primaryKey: true,
    autoIncrement: true,
  },
  user_group_id: {
    type: Sequelize.INTEGER
  },
  user_id: {
    type: Sequelize.INTEGER,
    references: {
      model: User,
      key: 'user_id'
    }
  }
}, {
  timestamps: false
}, {
  classMethods: {
    associate: function(models) {
      UserGroupAccess.belongsTo(models.User, { foreignKey: 'user_id' } );
    }
  },
  instanceMethods: {

  }
}, {
  underscored: true
});

It's worth mentioning that I'm attempting to understand Sequelize, so the above contains experimental code.

Then:

UserGroupAccess.findByEmail = function(email) {
  return this.findAll({
    where: {
      email: email
    },
    include: [{
      model: User,
      required: true
    }]
  })
}

When I attempt to sign in, I get:

SequelizeEagerLoadingError: users is not associated to user_group_access!

If I swap the table names I get the same error but in reverse.

I'm struggling to make a case for using Sequelize, given how verbose and inscrutable the code is!

Ideas?

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.