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I have some Mocha tests that are failing an assert.equal although it seems the 2 items are identical. I may not understand how the tests are running, but even the error output shows 2 similar things:

states.js

const sqlite3 = require('sqlite3').verbose();
const util = require('util');

async function getDB() {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        let db = new sqlite3.Database('./project.db', (err) => {
          if (err) {
            console.error(err.message);
                reject(err)
          } else {
            console.log('Connected to the project database.');
                resolve(db)
        }
        });
        return db
    });
}

exports.getDB = getDB

try {
        // run these statements once to set up the db
        // let db = getDB();
        // db.run(`CREATE TABLE services(id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, service text, date text)`);
        // db.run(`INSERT INTO services(id, service, date) VALUES (1, 'blah', '01-23-1987')`)
} catch(err) {
    console.log(err)
}

// is working
exports.get = async function(service) {
     function getResults(service) {
     return new Promise(async function (resolve, reject) {
                const db = await getDB();
                let sql = `SELECT Id id,
                               Service service,
                                                Date date
                        FROM services
                        WHERE service  = ?`;
                 db.get(sql, [service], (err, row) => {
                    if (err) {
                     console.error(err.message);
                     reject(err)
                 } else {
                     if (row) {
                         let this_row = {'id': row.id, 'service': row.service, 'date': row.date};
                         this_row ? console.log(row.id, row.service, row.date) : console.log(`No service found with the name ${service}`);
                         resolve(this_row)
                     } else {
                         resolve(null)
                     }
                 }
                })
     });
  }
    let row = await getResults(service)
    return row
}


let row = exports.get('blah')

console.log("Printing out what get returns:")
console.log(row)


exports.set = async function(service, state) {
    function setResults(service) {
        return new Promise(async function (resolve, reject) {
             const db = await getDB();
             let sql = `UPDATE services
                                set id = ?,
                                            service = ?,
                                            date = ?
                                 WHERE service  = ?`;
                try {
                    db.run(sql, [state.id, service, state.date, service]);
                    resolve();
                } catch(err) {
                    reject(err);
                }
    });
  }
    await setResults(service)
}

exports.set('blah', {'id': 1, 'date': '01-23-1987'})

exports.clear = async function(service) {
    function deleteResults(service) {
        return new Promise(async function (resolve, reject) {
             const db = await getDB();
             let sql = `DELETE from services
                                  WHERE service  = ?`;
                db.run(sql, [service]);
        });
    }
    await deleteResults(service)
}

tests.js

const mocha = require('mocha');

const assert = require('assert');
const expect = require('chai').expect;
const should = require('chai').should();

const state = require('../state');

let deletion_sql = `DELETE from services WHERE service  = ?`;

it("get() should return the expected row", async function() {
    let db = await state.getDB()
    await db.run(deletion_sql, 'blah')
    await db.run(`INSERT INTO services(id, service, date) VALUES (1, 'blah', '01-23-1987')`)
    let result = await state.get('blah')
    console.log("get test result is")
    console.log(result)
    assert.equal(result, { 'id': 1, 'service': 'blah', 'date': '01-23-1987' })
});


it("set() should set to new values as expected", async function() {
    let db = await state.getDB()
    await db.run(deletion_sql, 'blah')
    await db.run(`INSERT INTO services(id, service, date) VALUES (1, 'blah', '01-23-1987')`)
    await state.set('blah', {'id': 5, 'date': '05-22-2222'})
    let result = await state.get('blah')
    console.log("set test result is")
    console.log(result)
    assert.equal(result, { 'id': 5, 'service': 'blah', 'date': '05-22-2222' })
});

it("clear() should delete row from db", async function() {
  await state.clear('blah')
  let result = await state.get('blah')
  assert.equal(result, null)
})

The output is as follows:

get test result is
{ id: 1, service: 'blah', date: '01-23-1987' }
  1) get() should return the expected row
5 'blah' '05-22-2222'

set test result is
{ id: 5, service: 'blah', date: '05-22-2222' }
  2) set() should set to new values as expected

  3) clear() should delete row from db

  0 passing (2s)
  3 failing

  1) get() should return the expected row:

      AssertionError [ERR_ASSERTION]: { id: 1, service: 'blah', date: '01-23-1987' } == { id: 1, service: 'blah', date: '01-23-1987' }
      + expected - actual


      at Context.<anonymous> (src\tests\testStates.js:26:12)
      at process._tickCallback (internal/process/next_tick.js:68:7)

  2) set() should set to new values as expected:

      AssertionError [ERR_ASSERTION]: { id: 5, service: 'blah', date: '05-22-2222' } == { id: 5, service: 'blah', date: '05-22-2222' }
      + expected - actual

When the items actually differ, it normally shows the diff with a + and - underneath the error, but here expected and actual are blank, and the == shows 2 identical items for both test 1 and 2. Why would an assert.equal test fail for identical items? There must be something I'm missing about these objects. Are they different because it still represents it as a promise and not an object? I did use await keyword for both.

1

I recommend that you change your assertion to use chai's deepEqual() when comparing JavaScript objects. Thus, you compare objects so that they have the same keys and same values.

If you use the equal() method like you have in the example you are comparing the actual and expected objects by using ==. Typically, this is not something that you are interested in when comparing JavaScript objects (unless you are comparing that two variables reference the same object, but then I recommend that you use strictEqual() instead).

  • 1
    Watch yourself because deep equal also have it's pitfalls. Because NaN is not equal to NaN if your object has any attribute that is NaN tests will fail and you will pull your hair... – Rouz May 15 at 20:03
  • 1
    Yes, on on hand it makes sense, because like you say NaN !== NaN. On the other hand it does not make sense because of the same reason. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ – matsev May 15 at 20:55
  • 1
    yeah, this is the designed behavior of the language. However one should be aware that significant amount of ppl will not expect this kind of behavior and will be expecting something else :) – Rouz May 15 at 22:54
  • thank you so much matsev – codyc4321 May 17 at 16:06
  • this makes sense as equal expects the same exact object in memory, much appreciated – codyc4321 May 17 at 16:07

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