5

If I have an ES6 class like:

class Foo {
  constructor(bar) {
    this.bar = bar;
  }
  echo(value=this.bar) {
    return value;
  }
}

this.bar should be re-evaluated each time echo is called.

f = new Foo(10);
f.echo();
>> 10
f.bar = 99;
f.echo();
>> 99

Are there any potential issues that could come from this usage?

  • What output were you expecting ? – Dimitri Mockelyn May 15 at 20:04
  • The default argument scope thing is crazy – Pointy May 15 at 20:04
  • It's doing what I expect, I'm just wondering if this is bad practice or could lead to some unforeseen consequences. – rovyko May 15 at 20:05
2

Well there is nothing BIG to be concerned of, except the usual js this problem. You can inject values into this method using the call, bind, etc method. This could also cause errors and inconsistencies.

class Foo {
  constructor(bar) {
    this.bar = bar;
  }
  echo(value=this.bar) {
    return value;
  }
}

f = new Foo(10);
console.log('f', f.echo().toFixed(0))
console.log('f', f.echo.call({bar: 50}).toFixed(0))

try{
  console.log('f', f.echo.call(window).toFixed(0))
}catch(e){
  console.error(e);
}


class Fooo {
  constructor(bar) {
    this.bar = bar;
    // fixing the scope
    this.echo = (value=this.bar) => {
      return value;
    }
  }
}


f2 = new Fooo(10);
console.log('f2', f2.echo().toFixed(0))
console.log('f2', f2.echo.call({bar: 50}).toFixed(0))

try{
  console.log('f2', f2.echo.call(window).toFixed(0))
}catch(e){
  console.error(e);
}

  • Are proxy objects really that big of a problem here? If somebody is in a position to supply proxies to OP's code, the this.bar is hardly the only vector of attack. Absolutely everything would be vulnerable and the attacker can likely just write a straight infinite loop anyway, without needing to ever construct a proxy. So, it's like saying that if somebody broke into your home, they could steal all your pennies lying around. While true, that's not the biggest problem you have. – VLAZ May 16 at 3:43
  • Of cause there is a lot to attack in this case. But with proxies you might even bypass read only and frozen properties defined by Object.defineProperty(). I just wanted to show, what also code execution in the objects scope in general is possible in this case. The DoS attack was just a example :) – Bellian May 16 at 7:22
  • And I don't think it's really relevant to bring up. Pretty much every code is vulnerable. An attacker can overwrite the .sort() method but I see no reason in bringing it up on a question on sorting arrays. And, again, if an attacker can do that, protecting against a malicious .sort() method is the least of your worries. Similarly here if an attacker is supplying you with malicious proxies should be near the bottom of the priority list - the attacker would already be able to write for(;;) instead of new Proxy(). Protecting only against the latter doesn't have a lot of value. – VLAZ May 16 at 7:28
  • Well ok. I removed it ;) – Bellian May 16 at 7:31
2

It's technically correct, but it better to reduce scope as much as possible. The overuse of global (this) variables can lead to messy or hard-to-read code aka spaghetti code.

1

Well..

echo(value=this.bar) will set value to this.bar if value === undefined as pointed out in the comments. So you are doing: value = value === undefined ? this.bar : value;

It`s basically the same thing as doing:

class Foo {
  constructor(bar) {
    this.bar = bar;
  }
  echo(value) {
    let value = value === undefined ? this.bar : value;
    return value;
  }
}

If thats what you want - it's perfectly fine.

  • 5
    That is not true. echo(value=this.bar) will set value to this.bar if value === undefined. its more like: value = value === undefined ? this.bar : value; – Bellian May 15 at 20:26
  • @Bellian well in this particular case (without seeing more code) it would always be undefined. Or am I wrong? – DigitalJedi May 15 at 20:28
  • You are. Value can be set on function call. (echo('hello world')) developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Bellian May 15 at 20:31
  • 1
    @Bellian thank you for pointing it out, I have edited my answer – DigitalJedi May 15 at 20:33
1

It appears the default param is evaluated at call time, so as long as this hasn't been bound by .bind(), .call(), or .apply(), it will always refer to the object it's called on when used within a method

I don't see any issues, unless you were to extend Foo, and call echo on a child object which also has bar property

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