4

This is OK:

a = 1, 2, 3
b = *a,

But this is invalid syntax:

b += *a,

This is OK:

b += (*a,)

Update

From the documentation:

assignment_stmt ::= (target_list "=")+ (starred_expression | yield_expression)

augmented_assignment_stmt ::= augtarget augop (expression_list | yield_expression)

So here is a difference in the specifications of an assignment and an augmented assignment - the latter has expression_list instead of starred_expression.

Still, it would be nice if someone could explain the reason in plain language. :)

1

Probably, that comes from operator precedence, "(expressions...)" have the highest one. Not sure about the case, when tuple is defined implicitly. Take look at this:

>>> a = (1, 2, 3)
>>> b = (1, 2, 3)
>>> b = b + *a,
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    b = b + *a,
            ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax
>>> b = b + (*a,)
>>> b
(1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3)
  • += is not an operator. – Gene May 15 at 21:49
  • But "(expressions...)" is :) In the first case you have syntax error, but in the second case you are concatenating tuples (explanation is provided above). – phoenix May 15 at 22:02
  • 1
    This is different. In 'b + *a,' '+' is an operator, so you have an invalid expression 'b + *a' followed by a comma. OTOH, 'b += *a,' is not much different from 'b = *a,' - there is a tuple on the right hand side of an assignment. – Gene May 15 at 22:42
  • 1
    The only fault here is that you start with "probably" :) +1 – Mad Physicist May 16 at 5:04
  • MadPhysicist, that's just to be soft, thank you. @Gene a += 1 is like a = a + 1, just try to simplify the code (= in the second case (*a,) is a tuple as "(...)" operation is performed with the highest priority, in the first case you are trying to perform weird operation " + *a, ", that causes error. – phoenix May 16 at 16:52

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