3

I have an undirected coloured (adjacent nodes have different colors) graph and I need to calculate an hash so that if two graphs are isomorphic they have the same hash (the graph is also planar, I don't know if it can make some difference).

My data structure is this:

class Node:
    def __init__(self, id, color):
        self.id = id # int
        self.color = color # string
        self.adjacentNodes = set()

The id property is used for the program logic, so it shouldn't taken into account in comparing graphs.

My idea is to sort the nodes of the graph and then, from the first node, to explore the adjacent nodes in order to generate a tree of the graph. Then I generate a unique string from the tree (actually I'm generating the string during the exploration). So, what I'm trying to do, is to find a sort of canonization of the graph.

Description

I sort nodes first by the degree and then by color property name in ascending order. I take the first node and start exploring adjacent nodes with a depth first search sorting them in the same way. I keep track of already visited nodes to avoid expanding old ones.

My string is generated like this: using the depth first search, every time I reach a new node I append to the graph string the following:

  • node color
  • node degree
  • index in list of visited nodes

Maybe it is redundant but I thought that those informations were sufficient to garantee a right canonization.

The real probles is when two nodes has same degree and same color during sorting. What I do should garantee canonization but is not very efficient. Taken the a group of similar nodes (same degree and color), I generate a subtree for each node and the associated string to the subtree and I choose the biggest one (sorting them in descending order) as next in the node sorting. Then I remove this last node and I repeat the operation until this group is empty. I need to do this because after choosing the first node, I might have changed the list of visited nodes and then the new strings might be differents.

Currently this implementation is very inefficient:

# actually this function return the unique string associated with the graph
# that will be hashed with the function hash() in a second moment
def new_hash(graph, queue=[]): # graph: list of Node
    if not queue: # first call: find the root of the tree
        graph.sort(key = lambda x: (len(x.adjacentNodes), x.color), reverse=True)
        groups = itertools.groupby(graph, key = lambda x: (len(x.adjacentNodes), x.color))
        roots = []
        result_hash = ''

        for _, group in groups:
            roots  = [x for x in group]
            break # I just need the first (the candidates roots)

        temp_hashes = []

        for node in roots:
            temp_queue = [node.id]
            temp_hash = node.color + str(len(node.adjacentNodes)) + str(temp_queue.index(node.id))
            temp_hash += new_hash(list(node.adjacentNodes), temp_queue)
            temp_hashes.append((node, temp_hash, temp_queue))

        temp_hashes.sort(key = lambda x: x[1], reverse=True)
        queue = temp_hashes[0][2]        
        result_hash += temp_hashes[0][1]
        result_hash += new_hash(list(temp_hashes[0][0].adjacentNodes), queue=queue)
    else:
        graph.sort(key = lambda x: (len(x.adjacentNodes), x.color), reverse=True)
        groups = itertools.groupby(graph, key = lambda x: (len(x.adjacentNodes), x.color))
        grouped_nodes = []
        result_hash = ''

        for _, group in groups:
            grouped_nodes.append([x for x in group])

        for group in grouped_nodes:
            while len(group) > 0:
                temp_hashes = []

                for node in group:
                    if node.id in queue:
                        temp_hash = node.color + str(len(node.adjacentNodes)) + str(queue.index(node.id))
                        temp_hashes.append((node, temp_hash, queue))
                    else:
                        temp_queue = queue[:]
                        temp_queue.append(node.id)
                        temp_hash = node.color + str(len(node.adjacentNodes)) + str(temp_queue.index(node.id))
                        temp_hash += new_hash(list(node.adjacentNodes), queue=temp_queue)
                        temp_hashes.append((node, temp_hash, temp_queue))

                temp_hashes.sort(key = lambda x: x[1], reverse=True)
                queue = temp_hashes[0][2]
                result_hash += temp_hashes[0][1]
                group.remove(temp_hashes[0][0])

    return result_hash

Questions

Therefore I have two questions:

  • does my algorithm really works (I mean, it seems to work, but I don't have any mathematical proof)?
  • is there a faster algorithm (less complexity) to calculate the hash?
  • A google search turned up this paper that might be helpful: eprint.iacr.org/2012/352.pdf (or it might be more information than you need for your current purposes) – Code-Apprentice May 15 at 22:03
  • And docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/… seems to be a similar paper from same authors – Code-Apprentice May 15 at 22:06
  • If there are no collisions between inequivalent inputs, it’s not hashing. It’s not canonicalization either if equivalent inputs do not reliably give equal outputs. This is a sort of signature algorithm, and will be difficult/expensive in general (since graph isomorphism is, as far as is known). – Davis Herring May 16 at 1:05
  • I know that actually it is not a hash even if I will call hash on the result. Anyway I think that what I'm doing is a graph canonization. I'm trying to find a canonical form that bring me exploring the tree always in the same way in order to generate the correct string identifier. – dome May 16 at 11:25
  • @Code-Apprentice I looked to the papers. They are interesting but don't explicity talk about isophormism and I think don't solve my problem for my kind of graph. – dome May 17 at 14:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.