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We are accessing DB2 from C# using IBM's DB2 libraries https://www.nuget.org/packages/IBM.Data.DB2.Core/

We want to wrap IBM's library in a library of our own, adding DB2 related functionality to application developers.

The problem is that IBM's library is based on native dll's which are included in their package. However these native dll's are not copied to build output folder when IBMs library is only indirectly referenced through our own DB2 wrapper library

I suspect that I need to include the native dll's in our own library. Only I am not sure how to do that.

The nuget package we create of our wrapper library is created from the csproj file

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">

  <PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFramework>netstandard2.0</TargetFramework>
    <GeneratePackageOnBuild>true</GeneratePackageOnBuild>
    <Version>1.0.0</Version>
    <PlatformTarget>x64</PlatformTarget>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <ItemGroup>
    <PackageReference Include="IBM.Data.DB2.Core" Version="1.3.0.100" />
  </ItemGroup>

</Project>
  • IBM's business model is to always have a friendly voice to help you out, it would be a mistake to not take advantage of it. But sure, very common problem without that phone call. Google ".netcore nuget package copy native dlls", hard to pick the best. – Hans Passant May 15 at 22:13
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It's complicated. NuGet has two ways to consume packages, and the two ways work somewhat differently. The original way was with packages.config (PC) and the new way is PackageReference (PR).

NuGet with PC has no concept of runtimes, so they way it's often implemented, and having a quick look at the package, it appears this is the case, the package author bundles MSBuild props and/or targets files in the package, and these targets modifies the build to copy the native files on build. A project using PC, when a package is installed, all dependencies are also installed, so all packages are direct dependencies of the project and any build targets in packages are imported into the project.

Projects using NuGet with PR on the other hand can reference just their direct dependencies, but dependencies of packages come in transitively. NuGet only tells MSBuild to import build targets from direct dependencies, not transitive dependencies. So that explains the behaviour you're seeing.

In NuGet 5.0 (released with Visual Studio 2019, and I can't remember which versions of .NET Core SDK), we added a buildTransitive feature that will pull in build props/targets from transitive packages. However it requires the package author to reauthor their packages to use it.

  • Thanks zivkan. I did not find much documentation on this feature. But what I understand from this article github.com/NuGet/Home/wiki/… IBM should modify their folder structure in their nuget-package. so the native dll's will be transative. Is that correct? – Torben Nielsen May 16 at 5:46
  • I just tried re-packaging IBM's library. Looks like it is not enough to add buildTransitive folder. Do you know of any documentation of this feature? Or maybe a sample where it has been used, which I can look at? – Torben Nielsen May 16 at 9:21
  • Unfortunately the dev who implemented it left the team before writing docs. I assume it works the same way as the build folder. NuGet itself only cares about the props and targets file, but only if the bit before the extension matches the package id exactly. it's up to the props and targets files to do the right thing with any other files. If after a restore the files don't appear in nuget.g.props or nuget.g.targets, then the name of the files in the package are wrong – zivkan May 16 at 12:18

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