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I am using vloadn to load data and as a parameter I pass the range I want to read and it works, but I am wondering what's the behavior of vload4. If this might cause some unexpected issue or I am perfectly safe to do this. An example might be something like this:

__kernel void myKernel(__global float* data_ptr, int size)
{
     float4 vec = vload4(0, data_ptr);
     float sum = 0.f;
     // data_ptr points to an array of 2 floats in global mem
     if (size == 2) {
          sum += vec.s1;
          sum += vec.s0;
     }
     else if (size == 1) {
          sum += vec.s0;
     }     
}

data_ptr is an array of 2 floats in global memory, but even though I am accessing only those 2 floats, I am loading 4 floats using vload4. The reason I am asking is that I want to use a single vloadn and decide afterwards how much of it I actually want to use and not to use vloadn based on size (e.g. for size==4 use vload4, for size==8 vload8 etc.

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If it's still within data_ptr it will be fine; you don't have to use all the data you read. However, if you read past either end of the buffer that data_ptr points to you can have problems (memory read exception, for example, or some other device-dependent error). Note: Check the address alignment requirements for vload to see if you're allowed to read at any address or only multiple of with size.

  • Well that's what I worry about. If I used something like memcpy in C to copy 4 elements, it would copy the first 2 elements from the array and the other 2 would be some garbage, which was after it, but it would not trigger a mem read exception. Can vload cause a mem read exception in this case? If the allocated memory is smaller than what I am attempting to read? – Maci May 16 at 21:08
  • Of course. And your memcpy could have too. You just lucked out that your page tables were large enough. You should never ever read or write past the end (or beginning) of a buffer; it might not be your memory and could trigger an exception. – Dithermaster May 16 at 23:29

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