0

I want to light up a LED wirelessly through processing.

what I have so far.

  1. I can (wirelessly) turn on my LED using a serial terminal called "Bluterm".
  2. I can turn on my LED by pressing 1 or 0 to switch LED on and off in processing.

How can I leave Bluterm out of my equation and use processing to send the 1 and 0 through bluetooth.

Here is my code for processing:

import processing.serial.*;

Serial port;


String string;
void setup(){
    String portName = Serial.list()[2]; //change the 0 to a 1 or 2 etc. to match your port
    port = new Serial(this, portName, 9600);
    port.bufferUntil('\n');
}

void draw() {

  printArray(string); 
}

void keyPressed() { 
  if (key =='1'){port.write('1');}
    if (key=='0') {port.write('0');}
    }

    void serialEvent(Serial port) {
      string = port.readStringUntil('\n');}

and the Arduino code


char data;
int led = 13;

void setup() { 
  pinMode(led, OUTPUT);
  Serial.begin(9600); 

}

void loop() { 
  if (Serial.available()>0){
    data = Serial.read(); 
  }


  if (data=='1'){
    Serial.println("HELLO");
    digitalWrite(led, HIGH);


    }

    else if (data=='0'){
      digitalWrite(led, LOW);
      Serial.println("BYE");}
    }

I'm kind of lost, can processing talk to bluetooth or do I always need a terminal?

If something isn't clear pls don't hesitate to ask,

Thank you for your time,

Juriaan

0

The Processing code makes sense.

It could do with a bit of formatting and error checking, but it's all pretty much there:

import processing.serial.*;

Serial port;


String string = "";
void setup() {
  String portName = Serial.list()[2]; //change the 0 to a 1 or 2 etc. to match your port
  try{
    port = new Serial(this, portName, 9600);
    port.bufferUntil('\n');
  }catch(Exception e){
    e.printStackTrace();
  }
}

void draw() {
  background(0);
  text(string,10,15);
}

void keyPressed() { 
  if(port != null){
    if (key =='1') {
      port.write('1');
    }
    if (key=='0') {
      port.write('0');
    }
  }
}

void serialEvent(Serial port) {
  string = port.readString();
  if(string == null){
    println("null serial string");
    string = "";
  }
}

The Arduino code looks legit too.

What's unclear is what Bluetooth module you're using and how you're setting it up.

For example, if you're using something like BlueSmirf, be sure to use the guide supplied.

The main points are:

  1. Make sure you're using the SerialPortProfile (SPP) Bluetooth Profile
  2. Double check you're wiring: the way your Arduino code reads you would be connect BT module's TX to Arduino's RX pin 0 and BT module's RX pin to Arduino's TX pin 1. Note you may want to do that after you upload your firmware with Arduino (as pin's 0 and 1 are Arduino's hardware Serial), otherwise goto point 3 :) (recommeded)
  3. If you use an Arduino with multiple hardware serial ports (like Arduino mega) go with those (e.g. Serial1 instead of Serial) otherwise use a SoftwareSerial library with a low baud rate (like 9600), avoiding high baud rates.

Update

The HC-05 module uses 3.3V logic, while the Arduino uses 5V logic. Uses a bidirectional 3.3V <-> 5V logic level converter or resistors, otherwise you risk frying your HC-05 module:

HC-05 Arduino wiring

A quick search returns a detailed HowToMechatronics.com Arduino and HC-05 Bluetooth Module Tutorial

  • Hello George, I use a HC05. It is connected like this: 5V-5V, GRN-GRN, TX-RX, RX-TX. How would I imply the SPP in my code? – Juriaan May 15 at 23:23
  • Close enough, though the HC05 is 3.3V logic (not 5V). Hopefully you haven't fried your board and you can carry on with the tutorial I've linked above. – George Profenza May 16 at 0:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.