5

i am have been learning lambda and streams lately and have kind of been thrown into the deep end really early.

I currently have an array list of books, a user types in a word and if the word equals the books author or title, the books toString(all attributes of the book nicely formatted) is called and returned. Very easy without lambda. But with lambda i just cant seem to figure out how to get it all to work out.

Additionally with the lambda i have to filter out all the books in the array that have a status of damaged or deleted.

The thing is i have to return the results from the stream to eventually display in a gui but cant seem to return any value of a stream.

I have a predicate which will try to do the matching of input parameters. I have no idea if this is right or not and i am pretty burnt out with trying.

I was just wondering the necessary changes i need to make to get this to work?

public String getBookByTitleOrAuthor(String titleOrAuthor) {
    books.stream()
         .filter(BookPredicate.matchTitleOrAuthor(titleOrAuthor))
         .filter(returnedBook -> returnedBook.getBookStatus() != 
            Book.bookStatus.Damaged && returnedBook.getBookStatus() != 
            Book.bookStatus.Deleted)
         .forEach(returnedBook -> returnedBook.toString());

}


// My predicate
public static Predicate<Book> matchTitleOrAuthor(String titleOrAuthor) {
    return b -> titleOrAuthor.equals(b.getTitle()) || 
    titleOrAuthor.equals(b.getAuthor());
}

Thanks in advance guys! sorry if this is a silly question.

My book status enum and getBookStatus:

 public bookStatus getBookStatus() {
         return this.bookStatus;
    }

      public enum bookStatus {
       Available,
       Reserved,
       Borrowed,
       Damaged,
       Deleted

     }
  • 2
    Honestly, such code is perfect for TDD, or at least for unit testing. Thus, the answer is: write a small unit test. Start with a small list of books, and check for expected results. Then, when that test fails, simply get into your debugger. Beyond that, without a real minimal reproducible example it might be pretty hard to tell you where exactly you have bugs or not. – GhostCat May 16 at 7:23
2

forEach returns void whereas you need a String. I wouldn't go with String, though. The method says "I return a book by title or author", so the user would expect a Book instance.

public Book getBookByTitleOrAuthor(String titleOrAuthor) {
    return books.stream()
                .filter(BookPredicate.matchTitleOrAuthor(titleOrAuthor))
                .filter(b -> {
                               final Book.bookStatus status = b.getBookStatus();
                               return status != null && 
                                      status != Book.bookStatus.Damaged && 
                                      status != Book.bookStatus.Deleted; 
                })  // can be moved into a BookPredicate method as well
                .findAny()
                .orElseThrow(() -> new IllegalArgumentException("There is no book for the given author or title."));
}
  • Thank you so so much this code almost works perfectly but it seems like it is not filtering out deleted or damaged books. I thought i took care of that with the statement inside of the filter but it seems to not work. Do i need to put if somewhere? – awyeanah2 May 16 at 7:42
  • @awyeanah2 could you show getBookStatus() and Book.bookStatus or the whole class? – Andrew Tobilko May 16 at 7:51
  • every book has a bookstatus and is one of the values in the enum – awyeanah2 May 16 at 7:57
  • @awyeanah2 it's weird - the second condition looks OK to me – Andrew Tobilko May 16 at 8:00
  • 1
    @awyeanah2 please, include the whole class and how books is being populated, I don't see the whole picture, so I might be missing something important – Andrew Tobilko May 16 at 8:03
1

We can do it with many ways. We should write clean code here and try to avoid multiple add conditions in single filter and move filters which has high computational cost to lower order. Secondly, you'll get list of matched books here like:

public List<String> getBookByTitleOrAuthor(String titleOrAuthor) {
        return books
            .stream()
            .filter(returnedBook.getBookStatus() != Book.bookStatus.Damaged)
            .filter(returnedBook.getBookStatus() != Book.bookStatus.Deleted)
            .filter(matchTitleOrAuthor(titleOrAuthor))
            .map(Book::toString)
            .collect(Collectors.toList());

}

And if you want only first match then use this:

public String getBookByTitleOrAuthor(String titleOrAuthor) {
        return books
            .stream()
            .filter(returnedBook.getBookStatus() != Book.bookStatus.Damaged)
            .filter(returnedBook.getBookStatus() != Book.bookStatus.Deleted)
            .filter(matchTitleOrAuthor(titleOrAuthor))
            .map(Book::toString)
            .findFirst()
            .orElse(null);
}

And if you want list of books then no need of map:

public List<Book> getBookByTitleOrAuthor(String titleOrAuthor) {
        return books
            .stream()
            .filter(returnedBook.getBookStatus() != Book.bookStatus.Damaged)
            .filter(returnedBook.getBookStatus() != Book.bookStatus.Deleted)
            .filter(matchTitleOrAuthor(titleOrAuthor))
            .collect(Collectors.toList());

}

Here if you see, code is more clean, easy to read and match filter apply only when first two are true Damaged and Deleted.

  • I disagree. Instead of refactoring/maintaining one place, now I should care of 3 different places. In my opinion, a good way would be having one filter and one method corresponding to it. – Andrew Tobilko May 16 at 8:34
  • Performance wise there is no difference but it depends case to case. In my opinion, readable and easily readable code is more important instead of making a single with multiple logical operators. – Tayyab Razaq May 16 at 9:06

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