7

In the ETL process, I receive a varchar field, and the length (of the value) is changed from row to row. I need to keep 5 symbols from the right side of the string. It means that I need to cut the left side but I can't, due to the unknown length.

I've tried the select substring('24:15:11',4, 5), but it doesn't help me, the string could be '2019-05-01 22:15:11'.

sql:

select substring('24:15:11',4, 5)

expected:

15:11
4
  • Hi! Have you tried the function RIGHT() ? not sure if it exists in your exact flavour of sql but I use it all the time in sql server. May 16 '19 at 7:31
  • 1
    @DavidSöderlund Is there a right() function in presto? I don't think so.
    – forpas
    May 16 '19 at 7:32
  • @DavidSöderlund - There doesn't appear to be a RIGHT function (prestodb.github.io/docs/current/functions/string), hence SUBSTRING.
    – Paul
    May 16 '19 at 7:34
  • I take it that your time segment will always be the same length (i.e. properly padded with lead zeroes (00:00:00)?
    – Paul
    May 16 '19 at 7:35
8

You can use substr. Negative starting position is interpreted as being relative to the end of the string.

select substr('24:15:11', -5)
2
  • Cool Thanks! didn't know that I can use negative index
    – Terpsihora
    May 16 '19 at 7:43
  • 1
    @Paul , the expected result in the question is minutes and seconds(the last five symbols).
    – hotfix
    May 16 '19 at 8:24
4

You can use length() to determine the 2nd argument of substr():

select substr('24:15:11', length('24:15:11') - 4, 5)

or simply:

select substr('24:15:11', length('24:15:11') - 4)

Read about preosto's string functions.

3
  • Cool Thanks! didn't know that I can use negative index
    – Terpsihora
    May 16 '19 at 7:44
  • @Terpsihora - he's not, really, he's deducting from the length. The second version is taking the length - 4 to the end of the string (i.e. there's no argument specified for number of characters, so EoS is assumed).
    – Paul
    May 16 '19 at 8:02
  • Well, linked docs for substr says A negative starting position is interpreted as being relative to the end of the string. - what's the point of using length then?
    – barbsan
    May 16 '19 at 8:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.