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I want to be able to output to both stdout(&stderr) AND to another file (log file) without worrying that the log file would get corrupted output for the case when shell is redirecting stdout(and/or stderr) to the same log file.

For my particular case, I've tried checking the stat bits(man 2 stat) for stdout and for the log file, in order to determine that they point to the same device and inode, in which case don't fopen() the log file but instead fopen() the stdout file, for writing to the log file. Exactly what I mean(.c code): https://github.com/libcheck/check/issues/188#issuecomment-492852881 This works as a workaround.

Here's a .c code example:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  FILE *f=NULL;
  f = fopen("/tmp/a_out_.log", "w");
  if (NULL == f) {
    fprintf(stderr,"oopsie\n");
  } else {
    fprintf(stdout, "Something");
    fprintf(f," messy ");
    fprintf(f," jessy\n");
    fprintf(stdout, " or another\n");
    fprintf(f,"More stuff\n");
    fclose(f);                                                                                                                  
  }
}

Run like this(from bash) to see the overwritten output:

$ gcc a.c && { ./a.out >/tmp/a_out_.log ; cat /tmp/a_out_.log ; }
Something or another
uff

I've simplified the .c code and reduced it to a bash lines, but the functionality (ie. garbled output) is illustrated just the same:

All of these show correct output:

(echo "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10" ; echo "blah" >&2)
(echo "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10" ; echo "blah" >&2) 1>/tmp/good 2>&1 ; cat /tmp/good
(echo "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10" ; echo "blah" >&2) 1>/dev/stdout 2>/dev/stdout
(echo "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10" ; echo "blah" >&2) 1>/proc/self/fd/1 2>/proc/self/fd/1
(echo "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10" ; echo "blah" >&2) 1>/proc/self/fd/2 2>/proc/self/fd/2

output is:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
blah

But, the following one shows overwritten output:

(echo "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10" ; echo "blah" >&2) 1>/tmp/bad 2>/tmp/bad; cat /tmp/bad

(the corrupted)output looks like:

blah
 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Real world example of where this is happening(with reproduction steps even): https://github.com/libcheck/check/issues/188

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  • 3
    Both the program and the shell (though the redirection) are writing to the same file simultaneously! That won't work very well (as you noticed). What are you really trying to do? Why are you redirecting to the same file as the program is writing to? What is the real problem you're trying to solve? – Some programmer dude May 16 at 11:45
  • @Someprogrammerdude You can replace file with terminal(in what you said) and for that it works, why? Real problem? use same log file for this case github.com/libcheck/check/issues/188 – howaboutsynergy May 16 at 11:50
  • 2
    It shouldn't be the program's responsibility to work around user mistakes. This is UNIX, after all. If the user does something foolish that's their problem, not yours. Let them remove the problematic redirection. – John Kugelman May 16 at 11:51
1

Why are parts of the output overwritten when redirected to the same file but not when on terminal?

Because you have the file open twice, separately, on a regular file, in ordinary write mode. Each open file description for that file has its own sense of the current file position, and that's where the data it writes go. Each file position advances only in accordance with the data written via the corresponding open file description. Whichever data happens to be written second at a given position replaces what was written first.

This does not happen for a terminal, because terminals are not seekable. It's as if they are always open in append mode. Opening your log file in append mode would provide half of a solution, and would be a good idea in any case:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  FILE *f=NULL;
  f = fopen("/tmp/a_out_.log", "a");  // <-- here is the change
  if (NULL == f) {
    fprintf(stderr,"oopsie\n");
  } else {
    fprintf(stdout, "Something");
    fprintf(f," messy ");
    fprintf(f," jessy\n");
    fprintf(stdout, " or another\n");
    fprintf(f,"More stuff\n");
    fclose(f);                                                                                                                  
  }
}

That way, writes to file f always go to the current end of file, regardless of what may have been done to the file by other means. If you want an existing log file to be truncated, however, then you'll have to do that yourself, unlike when you open in write ("w") mode.

As I said, however, although opening in append mode is probably a good idea in this case regardless, it's only half a solution. If the standard output is open on the same file, separately, in regular write mode, then writes from that direction still can and will overwrite other output. Frankly, I'd be inclined to say that that should not be your program's concern. If the user really wants to redirect the program's console output to its log file, then it is within their power to do so in append mode, by using the >> redirection operator instead of >. That would constitute the complement of the above half solution. If they use a > redirection instead then that's on them, and I would not go to extraordinary measures to detect or accommodate it.

  • Could you think of a case where cmd > file is better than the equivalent of doing : > file ; cmd >> file if it was done under the hood by the same command? ie. if cmd > file did that(create&truncate file, then redirect to it in append mode) instead, under the hood? In other words, why doesn't cmd > file do THAT already? – howaboutsynergy May 16 at 20:34
  • @howaboutsynergy, the > operator does not open the file in append mode because there's another operator for that. Additionally, the three basic redirection operators, <, >, and >> map nicely onto the three unidirectional open modes of fopen(), "r", "w", and "a". That opening in append mode does not first truncate the file seems natural to me; I don't know whether there is any deeper reason than that. – John Bollinger May 16 at 20:57
  • Adding O_APPEND to bash code responsible for > seems to work so far, no more overwrites even with fopen() "w"; the bash code is in ./make_cmd.c function make_redirection, line is temp->flags = O_TRUNC | O_WRONLY | O_CREAT; initially! discussion? So, can you (or anyone) think of any good reason why O_APPEND shouldn't be there? (genuinely want to know!) PS: <> is handled separately(just below, in their code). – howaboutsynergy May 16 at 22:13
  • 1
    I'm sorry @howaboutsynergy, are you seriously proposing that bash's behavior be changed? Although that should be technically feasible, it would render bash non-conforming. You have a mechanism for achieving the result you want with unmodified bash. – John Bollinger May 16 at 22:19
  • But it would be functionally the same, would it not? except that it "fixes" the overwriting issue. So it's more like a bugfix, imho :) But then again I'm not a developer... – howaboutsynergy May 16 at 22:26

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