0

I'm trying to build a Tic-Tac-Toe game in Python, which I'll later add AI to, but as it is now, the first move plays to an entire column, instead of just one square, so the first player always wins on their first move.

I know the problem has nothing to do with the generation of the row and column to play in, because the same problem occurred both when I used input() for this, and when I switched it to np.random.randint(). I've also pretty thoroughly checked the way that the game checks for game over, and the setup of the board itself, so I'm pretty sure the issue is either the move() method or the while loop that's executing the game.

Here is the code:

import numpy as np

class Tic_tac_toe:
    def __init__(self):
        self.board = [[None] * 3] * 3
        self.x_move = True
        self.winner = None

    def game_over(self, x_moved):
        cols = [[self.board[i][j] for i in range(3)] for j in range(3)]
        diag = [self.board[i][i] for i in range(3)]
        anti_diag = [self.board[i][-1 - i] for i in range(3)]
        if x_moved:
            x_won = [
                all(x for x in self.board[0]),
                all(x for x in self.board[1]),
                all(x for x in self.board[2]),
                all(x for x in cols[0]),
                all(x for x in cols[1]),
                all(x for x in cols[2]),
                all(x for x in diag),
                all(x for x in anti_diag)
            ]
            return any(x_won)
        else:
            o_won = [
                all(x == False for x in self.board[0]),
                all(x == False for x in self.board[1]),
                all(x == False for x in self.board[2]),
                all(x == False for x in cols[0]),
                all(x == False for x in cols[1]),
                all(x == False for x in cols[2]),
                all(x == False for x in diag),
                all(x == False for x in anti_diag)
            ]
            return any(o_won)

    def move(self, row, col):
        self.board[row][col] = self.x_move
        self.x_move = not self.x_move
        return self.game_over(not self.x_move)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    game = Tic_tac_toe()
    game_over = False
    while not game_over:
        row, col = np.random.randint(0, 3, size=2)
        print(row, col)
        game_over = game.move(row, col)
        for row in game.board:
            row = ['X' if square else 'O' if square == False else '_' for square in row]
            print(' '.join(row))
        if game_over:
            winner = 'O' if game.x_move else 'X'
            print(winner + ' wins!')

I expect this code to play a random game of tic-tac-toe. It should make a random move for x, print the move and the board after the move, then do the same for o, then repeat until one of them wins. Instead, it generates a row and column for x to play in, then plays to the entire column, then x wins. The output looks something like:

2 0
X _ _
X _ _
X _ _
X wins!

when the move "2 0" should give:

2 0
_ _ _
_ _ _
X _ _

and then it would be o's turn.

  • I was also specifically told not to post a whole file, which is what that would require. – alton1231 May 16 at 17:27
  • @alton1231 producing an MCVE is usually an exercise in reductionism. Take the smallest amount of code you reproduce the problem in (probably just a script defining your array, the function to assign an X to a square, and a if __name__ == '__main__' to kick it off), and post that instead. – Adam Smith May 16 at 17:30
  • In this case, that's the entire file. So now it's there. – alton1231 May 16 at 17:30
  • @alton1231 also usually you fix your own mistake just producing the MCVE, since when you try to minimize your code you'll often accidentally remove the part that's breaking it. – Adam Smith May 16 at 17:30
  • self.board = [[None] * 3] * 3 is the issue. – Adam Smith May 16 at 17:31
2

The problem is where you define self.board: self.board = [[None] * 3] * 3. This first creates the inner list [None, None, None] and then uses the inner list another 3 times to create self.board. In other words, each inner list in self.board is the EXACT same list in memory.

Want to see?

board = [[None] * 3] * 3
print(board) # >> Outputs [[None, None, None], [None, None, None], [None, None, None]]
print(board[0] is board[1]) # >> Outputs True because they are the same object in memory.
board[1][0] = 1
print(board) # >> Outputs [[1, None, None], [1, None, None], [1, None, None]]
# Since they are all the same list in memory, changing one of them changes all of them.

So how do you avoid this? Create a new list every time.

board = []
for i in range(3):
    board.append([None]*3) # Creates a new list every time
print(board[0] is board[1]) # > Outputs False

or a one-liner

board = [ [None]*3 for i in range(3) ]
print(board[0] is board[1]) # > Outputs False

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.