0

I have a injectable service that uses the useFactory attribute to control if it, or an implemented type is injected.

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';
import { Router } from '@angular/router';
import { signatureConfigurationServiceFactory } from '../../environments/services.factories';
import { RestService } from '.';

@Injectable({
  providedIn: 'root',
  useFactory: signatureConfigurationServiceFactory,
  deps: [Router, RestService]
})
export class SignatureConfigurationService {

  constructor(public router: Router, public restService: RestService) {
  }

  // ... 
}

The factory is defined in another file, services.factories.ts since I want to be able to replace this file with fileReplacements during ng build for another similar file that contains another factory.

import { Router } from '@angular/router';
import { RestService } from '../app/services';
import { SignatureConfigurationService } from '../app/services/signature-configuration.service';

export let signatureConfigurationServiceFactory = (router: Router, restService: RestService) => {
  return new SignatureConfigurationService(router, restService);
};

As my service references the factory and the factory references the service, I'm getting a circular reference here.

The Angular documentation mentions using forwardRef but the examples in the documentation do not apply do my situation.

How do I break out of this circular dependency while keeping the factory method in a separate file?

0

I found a solution.

A created a third class called ServiceFactoriesRegistry which contains all the factory functions as static properties of a type that is a function that returns any, so we don't have to import the file containing the service.

import { Router } from '@angular/router';
import { RestService } from '.';

export class ServiceFactoriesRegistry {
  public static signatureConfigurationServiceFactory: (router: Router, restService: RestService) => any;
}

I changed my previous file that contained the factory function to assign the factory method to this new registry. This file, services.factories.ts which will be replaced at build time has a dependency on both the factory method and the service.

import { Router } from '@angular/router';
import { RestService } from '../app/services';
import { ServiceFactoriesRegistry } from '../app/services/service-registry';
import { SignatureConfigurationService } from '../app/services/signature-configuration.service';

export function registerServices() {
  ServiceFactoriesRegistry.signatureConfigurationServiceFactory = (router: Router, restService: RestService) => {
    return new SignatureConfigurationService(router, restService);
  };
}

This exported function is called in my AppModule:

export class AppModule {
  constructor() {
    registerServices();
  }
}

And in the service itself I use the factory registry. While I have a dependency on the registry, I don't have one on the service factory method itself since it's registered elsewhere.

@Injectable({
  providedIn: 'root',
  useFactory: ServiceFactoriesRegistry.signatureConfigurationServiceFactory,
  deps: [Router, RestService]
})
export class SignatureConfigurationService
| improve this answer | |
-2

You don't have to declare variables that you are injecting in the constructor. You're actually declaring these twice when you do this.

So change this

export class SignatureConfigurationService {
router: Router;
restService: RestService;

constructor(router: Router, restService: RestService) {
this.router = router;
this.restService = restService;
}

Change to

export class SignatureConfigurationService {

  constructor(private router: Router,private restService: RestService) {}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for pointing this out. On my side though it won't work unless I explicitly use public or private in the constructor. Anyway, this doesn't answer my question. I'll edit it to change this so the focus is on the circular reference and not on on this particular issue. – Gilles May 16 '19 at 19:50
  • @Ĵošħ Williard you have to add private, protected or public. Check this article – robert May 16 '19 at 19:57

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