1

In Python 3.5, if I have two dictionaries that have the same keys and integer values I can add them like this:

x = {'a': 1, 'b': 2}
y = {'b': 3, 'c': 4}
z = {**x, **y}

But what if I have a very long list of dictionaries that share the format of x and y? What's the syntax for z in this case?

1

The for an arbitrary number of dicts in a list, just use a loop, that is the idiomatic way:

z = {}
for d in list_of_dicts:
    z.update(d)
  • Turns out I formulated my question wrong, but you did answer what I asked so thanks. – Austin May 16 '19 at 20:50
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>>> a = {1:11}
>>> b = {2:22}
>>> c = {3:33}
>>> list_abc = [a,b,c]
>>> from collections import ChainMap
>>> dict(ChainMap(*list_abc))
{1: 11, 2: 22, 3: 33}
>>>
0
x = {'a': 1, 'b': 2}
y = {'b': 3, 'c': 4}
z = {'b': 3, 'c': 4}

result = x.copy()

for d in (y,z):
    result.update(d)

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