2

I'm trying to parse the highstate output of Salt has proven to be difficult. Without changing the output to json due to the fact that I still want it to be human legible.

What's the best way to convert the Summary into something machine readable?

Summary for app1.domain.com
--------------
Succeeded: 278 (unchanged=12, changed=6)
Failed:      0
--------------
Total states run:     278
Total run time:     7.383 s
--
Summary for app2.domain.com
--------------
Succeeded: 278 (unchanged=12, changed=6)
Failed:      0
--------------
Total states run:     278
Total run time:     7.448 s
--
Summary for app0.domain.com
--------------
Succeeded: 293 (unchanged=13, changed=6)
Failed:      0
--------------
Total states run:     293
Total run time:     7.510 s

Without a better idea I'm trying to grep and awk the output and insert it into a csv.

These two work:

cat ${_FILE} | grep Summary | awk '{ print $3} ' | \
    tr '\n' ',' | sed '$s/,$/\n/' >> /tmp/highstate.csv;

cat ${_FILE} | grep -oP '(?<=unchanged=)[0-9]+' | \
    tr '\n' ',' | sed '$s/,$/\n/' >> /tmp/highstate.csv;

But this one fails but works in Reger

cat ${_FILE} | grep -oP '(?<=\schanged=)[0-9]+' | \
    tr '\n' ',' | sed '$s/,$/\n/' >> /tmp/highstate.csv;

EDIT1: @vintnes @ikegami I agree I'd much rather take the json output parse the output but Salt doesn't offer a summary of changes when outputting to josn. So far this is what I have and while very ugly, it's working.

cat ${_FILE} | grep Summary | awk '{ print $3} ' | \
    tr '\n' ',' | sed '$s/,$/\n/' >> /tmp/highstate_tmp.csv;

cat ${_FILE} | grep -oP '(?<=unchanged=)[0-9]+' | \
    tr '\n' ',' | sed '$s/,$/\n/' >> /tmp/highstate_tmp.csv;

cat ${_FILE} | grep unchanged | awk -F' ' '{ print $4}' | \
    grep -oP '(?<=changed=)[0-9]+' | tr '\n' ',' | sed '$s/,$/\n/' >> /tmp/highstate_tmp.csv;

cat ${_FILE} | { grep "Warning" || true; } | awk -F: '{print $2+0} END { if (!NR) print "null" }' | \
    tr '\n' ',' | sed '$s/,$/\n/' >> /tmp/highstate_tmp.csv;

cat ${_FILE} | { grep "Failed" || true; } | awk -F: '{print $2+0} END { if (!NR) print "null" }' | \
    tr '\n' ',' | sed '$s/,$/\n/' >> /tmp/highstate_tmp.csv;

csvtool transpose /tmp/highstate_tmp.csv > /tmp/highstate.csv;

sed -i '1 i\instance,unchanged,changed,warning,failed' /tmp/highstate.csv;

Output:

instance,unchanged,changed,warning,failed
app1.domain.com,12,6,,0
app0.domain.com,13,6,,0
app2.domain.com,12,6,,0
  • 2
    Please show your exact desired output. – vintnes May 17 at 0:50
  • 1
    The best way is to use jq to parse the json output, but awk can do this quite trivially if we know what exactly you want. – vintnes May 17 at 1:08
  • 1
    You're doing it backwards. Don't write a tool to produce the data from the "readable output", write a tool to produce the "readable output" from JSON. – ikegami May 17 at 1:28
2
perl -e'
   use strict;
   use warnings qw( all );

   use Text::CSV_XS qw( );

   my $csv = Text::CSV_XS->new({ auto_diag => 2, binary => 1 });
   $csv->say(select(), [qw( instance unchanged change warning failed )]);

   my ( $instance, $unchanged, $changed, $warning, $failed );
   while (<>) {
      if (/^Summary for (\S+)/) {
         ( $instance, $unchanged, $changed, $warning, $failed ) = $1;
      }
      elsif (/^Succeeded:\s+\d+ \(unchanged=(\d+), changed=(\d+)\)/) {
         ( $unchanged, $changed ) = ( $1, $2 );
      }
      elsif (/^Warning:\s+(\d+)/) {
         $warning = $1;
      }
      elsif (/^Failed:\s+(\d+)/) {
         $failed = $1;
         $csv->say(select(), [ $instance, $unchanged, $changed, $warning, $failed ]);
      }
   }
'

Provide input via STDIN, or provide path to file(s) from which to read as arguments.


Terse version:

perl -MText::CSV_XS -ne'
   BEGIN {
      $csv = Text::CSV_XS->new({ auto_diag => 2, binary => 1 });
      $csv->say(select(), [qw( instance unchanged change warning failed )]);
   }
   /^Summary for (\S+)/ and @row=$1;
   /^Succeeded:\s+\d+ \(unchanged=(\d+), changed=(\d+)\)/ and @row[1,2]=($1,$2);
   /^Warning:\s+(\d+)/ and $row[3]=$1;
   /^Failed:\s+(\d+)/ and ($row[4]=$1), $csv->say(select(), \@row);
'
1

Here you go. This will also work if your output contains warnings. Please note that the output is in a different order than you specified; it's the order in which each record occurs in the file. Don't hesitate with any questions.

$ awk -v OFS=, '
        BEGIN        { print "instance,unchanged,changed,warning,failed" }
        /^Summary/   { instance=$NF }
        /^Succeeded/ { split($3 $4 $5, S, /[^0-9]+/) }
        /^Failed/    { print instance, S[2], S[3], S[4], $2 }
' "$_FILE"
  • split($3 $4 $5, S, /[^0-9]+/) handles the possibility of warnings by disregarding the first two "words" Succeeded: ### and using any number of non-digits as a separator.

edit: Printed on /^Fail/ instead of using /^Summ/ and END.

  • good concise solution. And is hold all records in memory and spit it out. This fails the theme of awk stream processing. – Dudi Boy May 17 at 19:59
  • 1
    @DudiBoy It only holds each out until /^Summary/ is encountered. It runs END{print out} in order to handle the last record. – vintnes May 17 at 22:12
  • @DudiBoy made more clear and concise; please see edit – vintnes May 17 at 22:39
0

Improving answer from @vintnes. Producing output as tab separated CSV

Write awk script that reads values from lines by their order. Print each record as it is read.

script.awk

BEGIN {print("computer","succeeded","unchanged","changed","failed","states run","run time");}
FNR%8 == 1 {arr[1] = $3}
FNR%8 == 3 {arr[2] = $2; arr[3] = extractNum($3); arr[4] = extractNum($4)}
FNR%8 == 4 {arr[5] = $2;}
FNR%8 == 6 {arr[6] = $4;}
FNR%8 == 7 {arr[7] = $4; print arr[1],arr[2],arr[3],arr[4],arr[5],arr[6],arr[7];}

function extractNum(str){match(str,/[[:digit:]]+/,m);return m[0];}

run script

Tab separated CSV output

awk -v OFS="\t" -f script.awk input-1.txt input-2.txt ...

Comma separated CSV output

awk -v OFS="," -f script.awk input-1.txt input-2.txt ...

Output

computer        succeeded       unchanged        changed failed  states run      run time
app1.domain.com 278     12      6       0       278     7.383
app2.domain.com 278     12      6       0       278     7.448
app0.domain.com 293     13      6       0       293     7.510

computer,succeeded,unchanged,changed,failed,states run,run time
app1.domain.com,278,12,6,0,278,7.383
app2.domain.com,278,12,6,0,278,7.448
app0.domain.com,293,13,6,0,293,7.510

Explanation

BEGIN {print("computer","succeeded","unchanged","changed","failed","states run","run time");}

Print the heading CSV line

FNR%8 == 1 {arr[1] = $3}

Extract the arr[1] value from 3rd field in (first line from 8 lines)

FNR%8 == 3 {arr[2] = $2; arr[3] = extractNum($3); arr[4] = extractNum($4)}

Extract the arr[2,3,4] values from 2nd,3rd,4th fields in (third line from 8 lines)

FNR%8 == 4 {arr[5] = $2;}

Extract the arr[5] value from 2nd field in (4th line from 8 lines)

FNR%8 == 6 {arr[6] = $4;}

Extract the arr[6] value from 4th field in (6th line from 8 lines)

FNR%8 == 7 {arr[7] = $4;

Extract the arr[7] value from 4th field in (7th line from 8 lines)

print arr[1],arr[2],arr[3],arr[4],arr[5],arr[6],arr[7];}

print the array elements for the extracted variable at the completion of reading 7th line from 8 lines.

function extractNum(str){match(str,/[[:digit:]]+/,m);return m[0];}

Utility function to extract numbers from text field.

  • 1
    This is GNU Awk only; it depends on match(string, regex, array). It's also too brittle to handle the output that would be generated if a warning was encountered. – vintnes May 17 at 22:17

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