13

I'm trying to run a docker image with PostgreSQL that has a volume configured for persisting data.

docker-compose.yml

version: '3.1'

services:
  db:
    image: postgres
    restart: always
    volumes:
      - ./data:/var/lib/postgresql/data
    environment:
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: example

When I start the container I see the output

fixing permissions on existing directory /var/lib/postgresql/data ... ok

and the data folder is no longer readable for me.

If I elevate myself and access the data directory I can see that the files are there. Furthermore, the command ls -ld data gives me

drwx------ 19 systemd-coredump root 4096 May 17 16:22 data

I can manually set the directory permission with sudo chmod 755 data, but that only works until I restart the container.

Why does this happen, and how can I fix it?

7

The other answer indeed points to the root cause of the problem, however the help page it points to does not contain a solution. Here is what I came up with to make this work for me:

  1. start the container using your normal docker-compose file, this creates the directory with the hardcoded uid:gid (999:999)
version: '3.7'

services:
  db:
    image: postgres
    container_name: postgres
    volumes:
      - ./data:/var/lib/postgresql/data
    environment:
      POSTGRES_USER: fake_database_user
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: fake_database_PASSWORD
  1. stop the container and manually change the ownership to uid:gid you want (I'll use 1000:1000 for this example
$ docker stop postgres
$ sudo chown -R 1000:1000 ./data 
  1. Edit your docker file to add your desired uid:gid and start it up again using docker-compose (notice the user:)
version: '3.7'

services:
  db:
    image: postgres
    container_name: postgres
    volumes:
      - ./data:/var/lib/postgresql/data
    user: 1000:1000
    environment:
      POSTGRES_USER: fake_database_user
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: fake_database_password

The reason you can't just use user: from the start is that if the image runs as a different user it fails to create the data files.

On the image documentation page, it does mention a solution to add a volume to expose the /etc/passwd file as read-only in the image when providing --user option, however, that did not work for me with the latest image, as I was getting the following error. In fact none of the three proposed solutions worked for me.

initdb: error: could not change permissions of directory "/var/lib/postgresql/data": Operation not permitted
1
  • This is a great solution. Another option would be extend desired postgres image through a Dockerfile, for example as the one in this post
    – artu-hnrq
    Jun 24 at 23:48
5

This is because of what is written in the dockerfile of the postgres image.
From line 15 to 18, you'll see that the group 999 and the user 999 are used. I'm guessing that in your host, they map respectively to systemd-coredump and root.

You need to know that whenever you use a user/group in an image, if the uid/gid exist in your host, then it will be mapped to it.

You can read the documentation on the docker hub from the postgres image here. There is a section Arbitrary --user Notes that explain how it works in the context of this image.

2
  • 2
    Not really. The question is Why does this happen, and how can I fix it? (the last sentence). I've explained why because i beleive that knowing why a problem occurs is a great way to overcome it. As to how to solve it, i've added a link to the documentation and the section title where you can find the solution. Of course, i can just copy/paste the solution here, but chances are that it will probably be obsolete in a certain time. The documenation will (should) always be up to date. Aug 18 '20 at 7:17
  • 1
    Didn't offer a solution but still offered useful information, thanks!
    – isapir
    Sep 16 '20 at 20:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.