33

I'm trying to run a docker image with PostgreSQL that has a volume configured for persisting data.

docker-compose.yml

version: '3.1'

services:
  db:
    image: postgres
    restart: always
    volumes:
      - ./data:/var/lib/postgresql/data
    environment:
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: example

When I start the container I see the output

fixing permissions on existing directory /var/lib/postgresql/data ... ok

and the data folder is no longer readable for me.

If I elevate myself and access the data directory I can see that the files are there. Furthermore, the command ls -ld data gives me

drwx------ 19 systemd-coredump root 4096 May 17 16:22 data

I can manually set the directory permission with sudo chmod 755 data, but that only works until I restart the container.

Why does this happen, and how can I fix it?

8 Answers 8

27

The other answer indeed points to the root cause of the problem, however the help page it points to does not contain a solution. Here is what I came up with to make this work for me:

  1. start the container using your normal docker-compose file, this creates the directory with the hardcoded uid:gid (999:999)
version: '3.7'

services:
  db:
    image: postgres
    container_name: postgres
    volumes:
      - ./data:/var/lib/postgresql/data
    environment:
      POSTGRES_USER: fake_database_user
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: fake_database_PASSWORD
  1. stop the container and manually change the ownership to uid:gid you want (I'll use 1000:1000 for this example
$ docker stop postgres
$ sudo chown -R 1000:1000 ./data 
  1. Edit your docker file to add your desired uid:gid and start it up again using docker-compose (notice the user:)
version: '3.7'

services:
  db:
    image: postgres
    container_name: postgres
    volumes:
      - ./data:/var/lib/postgresql/data
    user: 1000:1000
    environment:
      POSTGRES_USER: fake_database_user
      POSTGRES_PASSWORD: fake_database_password

The reason you can't just use user: from the start is that if the image runs as a different user it fails to create the data files.

On the image documentation page, it does mention a solution to add a volume to expose the /etc/passwd file as read-only in the image when providing --user option, however, that did not work for me with the latest image, as I was getting the following error. In fact none of the three proposed solutions worked for me.

initdb: error: could not change permissions of directory "/var/lib/postgresql/data": Operation not permitted
4
  • This is a great solution. Another option would be extend desired postgres image through a Dockerfile, for example as the one in this post
    – artu-hnrq
    Jun 24, 2021 at 23:48
  • Can I use my username instead of 1000:1000, and leave the doker's side so that it can map the correct username to itself? like: user: myusername: . If not, will this work: user: myusername:root
    – Anmol Deep
    Mar 8, 2022 at 13:16
  • 1
    Faced same issue today, the solution is pretty simple - add folder owner UID to the docker command without changing the ownership. curent_user UID == 503 docker run -it -u 503 -e POSTGRES_PASSWORD=Password! -v /Users/curent_user/postgres-data/:/var/lib/postgresql/data -p 5432:5432 postgres:16 Sep 22, 2023 at 14:47
  • I usually don't downvote. But I downvoted because it has a manual step in between. Are you serious? How are you going to do this in CI/CD pipelines? Jan 10 at 6:28
6

This is because of what is written in the dockerfile of the postgres image.
From line 15 to 18, you'll see that the group 999 and the user 999 are used. I'm guessing that in your host, they map respectively to systemd-coredump and root.

You need to know that whenever you use a user/group in an image, if the uid/gid exist in your host, then it will be mapped to it.

You can read the documentation on the docker hub from the postgres image here. There is a section Arbitrary --user Notes that explain how it works in the context of this image.

2
  • 2
    Not really. The question is Why does this happen, and how can I fix it? (the last sentence). I've explained why because i beleive that knowing why a problem occurs is a great way to overcome it. As to how to solve it, i've added a link to the documentation and the section title where you can find the solution. Of course, i can just copy/paste the solution here, but chances are that it will probably be obsolete in a certain time. The documenation will (should) always be up to date. Aug 18, 2020 at 7:17
  • 1
    Didn't offer a solution but still offered useful information, thanks!
    – isapir
    Sep 16, 2020 at 20:37
3

An easier and permanent solution would be as follows:

Add these lines to ~/.bashrc:

export UID=$(id -u)
export GID=$(id -g)

Reload your shell:

$ source ~/.bashrc

Modify your docker-compose.yml as follows:

version: "3.7"
services:
  db:
    image: postgres
    volumes:
      - ./tmp/db:/var/lib/postgresql/data
    user: "${UID}:${GID}"
    ...

Source

3
  • is this enough? i dont need to create ./tmp/db folder in Dockerfile? Jun 7, 2022 at 12:31
  • this prints very annoying bash: UID: readonly variable in terminal on each start, also env vars most of the time are not exported Jun 7, 2022 at 16:02
  • 3
    this doesnt work at all chmod: /var/lib/postgresql/data: Operation not permitted, chmod: /var/run/postgresql: Operation not permitted, initdb: could not look up effective user ID 1000: user does not exist, Jun 8, 2022 at 7:00
3

here's what i did:


services:
    postgres:
        image: postgres:15.1
        restart: always
        environment:
            - POSTGRES_USER=my_user
            - POSTGRES_PASSWORD=my_user
            - POSTGRES_DB=my_user
        user: root
        ports:
            - "5432:5432"
        volumes:
            - /home/my_user/volumes/postgres/data:/var/lib/postgresql/data
            - /home/my_user/volumes/postgres/config:/etc/postgresql
    postgres_setup:
        image: postgres:15.1
        user: root
        volumes:
            - /home/my_user/volumes/postgres/data:/var/lib/postgresql/data
            - /home/my_user/volumes/postgres/config:/etc/postgresql
        entrypoint: [ "bash", "-c", "chmod 750 -R /var/lib/postgresql/data && chmod 750 -R /etc/postgresql"] 
        depends_on:
            - postgres
    pgadmin4:
        image: dpage/pgadmin4
        restart: always
        environment:
            - [email protected]
            - PGADMIN_DEFAULT_PASSWORD=my_user
            - PGADMIN_LISTEN_ADDRESS=0.0.0.0
        user: root
        ports:
            - "5050:80"
        volumes:
            - /home/my_user/volumes/pgadmin/data:/var/lib/pgadmin
        depends_on:
            - postgres_setup

the postgres_setup container just changes permissions and then shuts down

2
  • This worked great! Isn't there a way to pass the entrypoint command to the original container without adding a setup container?
    – Onat
    Feb 14, 2023 at 21:59
  • 2
    @Onat there probably is, but i hacked this because i was too lazy to do what the other answers said - not because i know what i'm doing...
    – rnd om
    Feb 15, 2023 at 0:48
1

What I wanted:

  • to run postgresql official image (v. 16.1) with docker-compose,
  • data folder binded to a local volume
  • numerical user/group of this volume decided by me

Unable to use user word in docker-compose yaml file just like in other cases (mysql and mongo for example); this will lead to a permissions issue that is well documented on the web.

Steps:

  • download Dockerfile and docker-ensure-initdb.sh + docker-entrypoint.sh form official GitHub repository postgresql repo

  • be sure that that the 3 files are in the same location and that the two .sh have the execute permissions (chmod +x)

  • edit the Dockerfile by setting the UID and the GID you want explicitly in the first lines of the file (when creating the postgres:postgres user and group)

  • build the image from the Dockerfile

    docker build -t your_image_tag_name .

  • adjust your docker-compose such that it refers to the newly created local image and that points to the folder you want to use for data storage

...
image: your_image_tag_name
volumes:
  - /path/to/your/data:/var/lib/postgresql/data
...
  • run with docker-compose and check the data folder having the correct UID/GID specified in the Dockerfile
0

I have been struggling with a similar issue and the answer hit me when trying to work around postgres (static uid per container, configured or 70 by default on alpine, 999 on standard image), and docker limitations (no uid translation of volumes).

The answer is to utilize Linux ACL without any changes to docker-compose.yml user - just keep the default internal container user id.

mkdir -p ./data
sudo setfacl -m u:$(id -u):rwx -R ./data/
docker-compose up -d

or

docker-compose up -d
sudo setfacl -m u:$(id -u):rwx -R ./data/

The order of creating data volume's directory does not matter and as long as ACL is set after it was created, you as a user will be able to access it recursively. You can of course add additional permissions.

To check who has access to data folder simply run:

getfacl ./data
0

For everyone who meet this problem, I just suggest you to use bitnami/postgresql or rapidfort/postgresql image instead of the official one.

For the above image, the permission problem can be simply resolved by run:

chown -R path/to/your/local_data_dir 1001:1001

Here is a docker-compose.yaml which work with command above:

services:
  postgresql:
    container_name: postgresql
    image: 'rapidfort/postgresql:11.19'
    volumes:
      - type: bind
        source: "path/to/your/local_data_dir"
        target: "/bitnami/postgresql"
0

Here what i had - Docker-compose with volume:

  • ./postgres-conf:/var/lib/postgresql/data postgres-conf

with permissions

drwx------ 19 my_user

Every start permissions was changed back to

drwx------ 19 999(postgres uid in container)

What i did: I created folder "postgres" and put there file Dockerfile with next content:

FROM postgres:15
RUN useradd -u 1000 -M my_user

Where 1000 - uid of my host user. Can be found in /etc/passwd (for note - file /etc/passwd is absent in postgres:15 image. You can find out list of users using command getent passwd )

And changed next strings in docker-compose:

image: postgres:15 

to

build:
  context: ./postgres
user: "my_user:my_user"

Then rebooted my container:

 docker-compose -f docker-compose-postgres.yml up --build

That's all, now uid of my user and uid of postgres server process user are the same, directory permission no longer changes after container reboot.

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