3

I'm trying to figure out how to use Dapper to pass in a user-defined composite type to a PostgreSQL function. I know this is possible with SQL Server and I've already got working examples using Dapper+SQL Server, however, I'm coming up short on how to do the same with PostgreSQL.

From some of the things I've read, I'm not sure if this is even possible with Dapper+PostgreSQL, but I know that it does work with plain Npgsql (and I've got a working example of that as well).

So, how does one call a PostgreSQL function that takes in a user-defined composite type using Dapper?

Example user-defined composite type

CREATE TYPE hero AS (
    first_name text,
    last_name text
);

Example PostgreSQL function that takes in the user-defined composite type

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION testfuncthattakesinudt(our_hero hero)
    RETURNS SETOF characters 
    LANGUAGE 'sql'

    STABLE
    ROWS 1000
AS $BODY$

    SELECT  *
    FROM    characters
    WHERE   first_name = COALESCE(our_hero.first_name, '')
    AND     last_name = COALESCE(our_hero.last_name, '');

$BODY$;

Theoretic C# Example

[Test]
public void UsingDapper_Query_CallFunctionThatTakesInUserDefinedCompositeType_FunctionUsesUserDefinedCompositeType()
{
    // Arrange
    using (var conn = new NpgsqlConnection(_getConnectionStringToDatabase()))
    {
        var funcName = "testfuncthattakesinudt";
        var expect = CharacterTestData.First();

        // Act
        var result = conn.Query<Character>(funcName,
            new
            {
                our_hero = new
                {
                    first_name = CharacterTestData.First().first_name,
                    last_name = CharacterTestData.First().last_name
                }
            },
            commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure
        );

        // Assert
        Assert.AreEqual(expect, result);
    }
}

I know that using plain Npgsql, it would be necessary to create the parameter something similar to:

var udtCompositeParameter = new NpgsqlParameter
{
    ParameterName = "our_hero",
    Value = new
    {
        first_name = CharacterTestData.First().first_name,
        last_name = CharacterTestData.First().last_name
    },
    DataTypeName = "hero"
};

But using Dapper, I haven't found a way to set DataTypeName or something similar. I've tried many different ways to shape the parameter for Dapper (for example using something like DynamicParameter and specifying dbType: DbType.Object), but regardless, I always get some similar error related to the composite type. I've also looked at the Dapper source, but from what I saw, it was light on PostgreSQL specific tests and those tests that seemed to be inline with what I'm trying to do were tailored to SQL Server.

2

UPDATE

Based on this answer, we were able to apply that concept to this question and provide a much cleaner result that didn't require the use of TypeHandlers.

Working Integration Test

public void Query_CallFunctionThatTakesInUserDefinedType_FunctionUsesUserDefinedType()
{
    // Arrange
    using (var conn = Db.GetConnection())
    {
        var functionName = "test_function_that_takes_in_udt";
        var expect = CharacterTestData.First();

        // Act
        var result = conn.Query<Character>(functionName,
            new 
            {
                our_hero = new HeroParameter(
                    CharacterTestData.First().FirstName,
                    CharacterTestData.First().LastName
                )
            },
            commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure
        ).FirstOrDefault();

        // Assert
        Assert.AreEqual(expect, result);
    }
}

NOTE There are some refactorings (names for example) in the code above since the original question, however, the body of the PostgreSQL function was unchanged. The most notable refactoring related to this answer is how the connection is created:

public NpgsqlConnection GetConnection()
{
    var connection = new NpgsqlConnection(GetConnectionStringToDatabase());
    Dapper.DefaultTypeMap.MatchNamesWithUnderscores = true;
    connection.Open();
    connection.ReloadTypes();

    /*
     * 
     * Ideally, should move this to be handled for _all_ connections like:
     *      NpgsqlConnection.GlobalTypeMapper.MapEnum<SomeEnum>("some_enum_type");
     *      NpgsqlConnection.GlobalTypeMapper.MapComposite<SomeType>("some_composite_type");
     *  
     */
    connection.TypeMapper.MapComposite<Hero>("hero");

    return connection;
}

Supporting HeroParameter

public class HeroParameter : ICustomQueryParameter
{
    private readonly Hero _hero;

    public HeroParameter(string firstName, string lastName)
    {
        _hero = new Hero(firstName, lastName);
    }

    public void AddParameter(IDbCommand command, string name)
    {
        var parameter = new NpgsqlParameter
        {
            ParameterName = name,
            Value = _hero,
            DataTypeName = "hero"
        };
        command.Parameters.Add(parameter);
    }
}

Not using TypeHandlers proved to be very advantageous in our situation.

This is due to the finicky nature in which PostgreSQL might use a UDT/composite type when being returned from a function. For example, if the UDT is one of 2 or more columns being returned, PostgreSQL returns the result set with the UDT column in the shape of (val1, val2). However, if the thing being returned is just the UDT, PostgreSQL will expand the UDT's individual properties to individual columns, much like a normal SELECT from a table.

For example, consider the following function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION example_function()
    RETURNS hero
    LANGUAGE SQL
AS
$$
SELECT ('Peter', 'Parker')::hero as heroes
$$

In this scenario, in order for the TypeHandler to work, we need the result to be in the following format:

|-----------------|
|      heroes     |
|-----------------|
| (Peter, Parker) |
|-----------------|

This is because after a call like conn.Query<Hero>(...), Dapper will pass the first column (and only the first) to the TypeHandler expecting it to do the necessary conversion.

However, the output from the above function, example_function, will actually return the result in the following expanded format:

|------------|-----------|
| first_name | last_name |
|------------|-----------|
|   Peter    |  Parker   |
|------------|-----------|

This means that the Type of value that gets passed to the TypeHandler.Parse() method is string in this example.

However, for functions that return the UDT as one of the columns when 2 or more columns are returned, then the TypeHandler works as expected because the single column's value is passed to the Parse method.

Consider this updated function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION example_function()
    RETURNS TABLE (year integer, hero hero)
    LANGUAGE SQL
AS
$$
SELECT 1962 AS year, ('Peter', 'Parker')::hero AS hero
$$

Which returns the output in the following format:

|------|-----------------|
| year |      hero       |
|------|-----------------|
| 1962 | (Peter, Parker) |
|------|-----------------|

This is where the original solution below falls short. In that example, I wasn't (yet) using the Parse method. However, once I needed to implement that function to support UDTs being returned, the TypeHandler wouldn't work based on the ways PostgreSQL returns the UDTs as demonstrated above.


ORIGINAL ANSWER

For anyone else that might stumble upon this question, this worked for me, although I'm not terribly happy with it, so I'm open to better solutions to this problem.

Working Integration Test

[Test]
public void Query_CallFunctionThatTakesInUserDefinedType_FunctionUsesUserDefinedType()
{
    // Arrange
    using (var conn = new NpgsqlConnection(Db.GetConnectionStringToDatabase()))
    {
        var funcName = "testfuncthattakesinudt";
        var expect = CharacterTestData.First();

        SqlMapper.AddTypeHandler(new HeroTypeHandler());
        conn.Open();
        conn.ReloadTypes();
        conn.TypeMapper.MapComposite<Hero>("hero");

        // Act
        var result = conn.Query<Character>(funcName,
            new
            {
                our_hero = new Hero
                {
                    first_name = CharacterTestData.First().first_name,
                    last_name = CharacterTestData.First().last_name
                }
            },
            commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure
        ).FirstOrDefault();

        // Assert
        Assert.AreEqual(expect, result);
    }
}

Supporting HeroTypeHandler

internal class HeroTypeHandler : SqlMapper.TypeHandler<Hero>
{
    public override Hero Parse(object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override void SetValue(IDbDataParameter parameter, Hero value)
    {
        parameter.Value = value;
    }
}

The fix seemed to be two parts:

  1. It was necessary to add a HeroTypeHandler and map it via SqlMapper.AddTypeHandler.
  2. I needed to map my type Hero to my PostgreSQL composite type hero via conn.TypeMapper.MapComposite. However, my gut feeling (so far) is that this is just me fighting my own integration tests, as in a real application it would probably (?) be ideal to register all composite types globally at the start of the application. (Or maybe not due to performance reasons if there is a lot of them?)

What I don't like about this solution though is that my HeroTypeHandler doesn't really provide any real value (no pun intended). By simply assigning value to parameter.Value things worked, which my guess would have been that this is something Dapper would have done for the call, but obviously not. (?) I'd prefer to not need to do that for a lot of composite types if I had a lot of them.

Note that since I'm only concerned with sending this type to a PostgreSQL function, I didn't find it necessary to implement the Parse method, hence the NotImplementedException. YMMV

Also, due to some refactoring since I posted the original question, there are some other minor differences. However, they were not related to the overall fix detailed above.

| improve this answer | |
0

Instead of SqlMapper.TypeHandler<Hero> or ICustomQueryParameter

you can use

Dapper.SqlMapper.AddTypeMap(typeof(Hero), DbType.Object);
| improve this answer | |
0

I went from a simpler solution in my application:

Set in the Start of my DbContext or Application the UDT Mapping.

NpgsqlConnection.GlobalTypeMapper.MapComposite<MyContactParameter>("udt_my_contact");

MyContactParameter Class:

public class MyContactParameter
{
    public Guid id { get; set; }

    public string name { get; set; }

    public string company_name  { get; set; }

    public bool is_something { get; set; }
}

Calling the DB procedure using Dapper passing an array of that UDT Type

await dapperConnection.ExecuteAsync(procedureName, new
          {
              param_first = "string anything",
              param_udt_list = new List<MyContactParameter>{ 
                  new MyContactParameter { 
                      id = Guid.NewId(),
                      name = "any name",
                      company_name = "any company name",
                      is_something = true
                  },
                  new MyContactParameter { 
                      id = Guid.NewId(),
                      name = "any name 2",
                      company_name = "any company name 2",
                      is_something = false
                  }
              }
          }, 
          commandType: CommandType.StoredProcedure
      );
| improve this answer | |

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