7

I have data from a hospital with many variables, and also from and to dates for each row, which tells us when each row is "valid". Each row can maximum be valid for a year.

test = data.frame(ID=c(10,10,10,12,12), Disease=c("P","P","P","D","P"), Pass=c("US","US","US","EN","EN"),
                  Payment=c(110,110,115,240,255), 
                  from_date=as.POSIXct(c("2008-01-09","2009-01-09","2010-01-09","2008-01-01","2013-12-31")),
                  to_date=as.POSIXct(c("2009-01-08","2010-01-08","2011-01-08","2008-12-31","2014-12-30"))
                  )

For the rows that pass from one year to another, I want to split up the rows, such that I end up with two rows instead of the original row, and also manipulate the from_date and to_date, such that I end up with a new dataset looking like this:

  test_desired = data.frame(ID=c(10,10,10,10,10,10,12,12,12), Disease=c("P","P","P","P","P","P","D","P","P"), Pass=c("US","US","US","US","US","US","EN","EN","EN"),
                              Payment=c(110,110,110,110,115,115,240,255,255), 
                              from_date=as.POSIXct(c("2008-01-09","2009-01-01","2009-01-09","2009-01-01","2010-01-09","2011-01-01","2008-01-01","2013-12-31","2014-01-01")),
                              to_date=as.POSIXct(c("2008-12-31","2009-01-08","2009-12-31","2010-01-08","2010-12-31","2011-01-08","2008-12-31","2013-12-31","2014-12-30"))
    )    

Attempt:

library(lubridate) #for function "year" below
test_desired=test
row=c()
tmp=c()
for(i in 1:nrow(test_desired)){
  if(year(test_desired$from_date)[i]<year(test_desired$to_date)[i]){
    test_desired$to_date[i] = as.POSIXct(paste0(year(test_desired$from_date[i]),"-12-31"))
    row = test_desired[i,]
    row$from_date = as.POSIXct(paste0(year(test$to_date[i]),"-01-01"))
    row$to_date = test$to_date[i]
    tmp=rbind(tmp,row)

  } else next
}
test_desired=rbind(test_desired,tmp)
library(dplyr)
test_desired=arrange(test_desired,ID,from_date)

Is there a more elegant way of doing this, for example with dplyr?

3

Here's a tidyverse based solution. It's similar to Lennyy's, but with fewer condition checks, and there's no issue with times being added (they might show up in a tibble, but as 00:00:00). I've added ungroup() because it sounds like you have a grouping variable somewhere (comment under Lennyy's solution). It can be removed if you don't:

library(dplyr)
library(lubridate)
library(purrr)

test %>% 
    ungroup() %>% # This isn't necessary if there are no groupings.
    split(rownames(test)) %>% 
    map_dfr(function(df){
        if (year(df$from_date) == year(df$to_date)) return(df)
        bind_rows(mutate(df, to_date = rollback(floor_date(to_date, "y"))),
                  mutate(df, from_date = floor_date(to_date, "y"))
                  )
    }
    )

#### OUTPUT ####

  ID Disease Pass Payment  from_date    to_date
1 10       P   US     110 2008-01-09 2008-12-31
2 10       P   US     110 2009-01-01 2009-01-08
3 10       P   US     110 2009-01-09 2009-12-31
4 10       P   US     110 2010-01-01 2010-01-08
5 10       P   US     115 2010-01-09 2010-12-31
6 10       P   US     115 2011-01-01 2011-01-08
7 12       D   EN     240 2008-01-01 2008-12-31
8 12       P   EN     255 2013-12-31 2013-12-31
9 12       P   EN     255 2014-01-01 2014-12-30

To explain: The dataframe is split into a list of rows. I then use map_dfr to run the function on each dataframe where from_date and to_date contain different years. map_dfr also binds the resulting dataframes together. Within the anonymous function I floor to_date by year, and then I either roll it back to the last day of the previous month for the new to_date in the first row, or leave it as it is for the new from_date in the second row.

2

Using from_date and to_date we can create a date sequence using seq.Date then split this sequence by year, finally select min and max of each year. Then use apply, separate_rows and separate to get the final result.

cr_date <- function(d1, d2){
    #browser()
    sequence_date <- seq.Date(as.Date(d1), as.Date(d2), by='day') 
    lst_dates <- lapply(split(sequence_date, lubridate::year(sequence_date)),
                        function(x) paste0(min(x), '|', max(x)))
    result <- paste0(lst_dates, collapse = ';')
    return(result)
  }

#Test
#cr_date(as.Date('2008-01-09'),as.Date('2009-01-08'))
test$flag <- apply(test, 1, function(x) cr_date(x['from_date'], x['to_date']))

library(tidyr)
separate_rows(test, flag, sep=';') %>% 
  separate(flag, into = c('from_date_new','to_date_new'), '\\|') %>% 
  mutate_at(vars('from_date_new','to_date_new'), list(~as.Date(.)))


    ID Disease Pass Payment  from_date    to_date from_date_new to_date_new
  1 10       P   US     110 2008-01-09 2009-01-08    2008-01-09  2008-12-31
  2 10       P   US     110 2008-01-09 2009-01-08    2009-01-01  2009-01-08
  3 10       P   US     110 2009-01-09 2010-01-08    2009-01-09  2009-12-31
  4 10       P   US     110 2009-01-09 2010-01-08    2010-01-01  2010-01-08
  5 10       P   US     115 2010-01-09 2011-01-08    2010-01-09  2010-12-31
  6 10       P   US     115 2010-01-09 2011-01-08    2011-01-01  2011-01-08
  7 12       D   EN     240 2008-01-01 2008-12-31    2008-01-01  2008-12-31
  8 12       P   EN     255 2013-12-31 2014-12-30    2013-12-31  2013-12-31
  9 12       P   EN     255 2013-12-31 2014-12-30    2014-01-01  2014-12-30
  • This gives me an error, and to_dates becomes NA: Warning message: Expected 2 pieces. Missing pieces filled with NA in 3547 rows [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, ...]. – Helen May 19 at 12:20
  • Yes, it's produced by separate. My dataset is quite big, is is something in particular you are looking for? – Helen May 19 at 12:28
  • So, one last question, this does not mantain the date format for the new date columns, correct? – Helen May 19 at 12:54
  • 1
    @Erosennin yes that is correct. See my update which handles this issue. – A. Suliman May 19 at 13:35
2

This uses only base R.

First note that only dates with no times are used so we should be using Date class, not POSIXct. The latter can needlessly introduce timezone errors unless you are very careful so in the Note at the end which shows the input used we assume that we are starting out with test2 which contains Date class data. The code in the Note also shows how to convert it to Date class if it it already POSIXct.

Given test2 we add from_year, to_year and eoy (date at the end of the year) columns giving test3. Then we iterate over the rows and if the years are the same return the row and if not return the split rows. This gives a list of one and two row data frames which we rbind together.

test3 <- transform(test2, 
  from_year = format(from_date, "%Y"),
  to_year = format(to_date, "%Y"),
  eoy = as.Date(sub("-.*", "-12-31", from_date)))

nr <- nrow(test2)
do.call("rbind", lapply(1:nr, function(i) with(test3[i, ],
  if (from_year == to_year) test2[i, ]
  else data.frame(ID, Disease, Pass, Payment, 
      from_date = c(from_date, eoy+1),
      to_date = c(eoy, to_date)))
))

Note

Assumed input in reproducible form. As noted above it uses Date class.

test2 <- transform(test, 
  from_date = as.Date(from_date),
  to_date = as.Date(to_date))
1

You could as well try something like below using dplyr and lubridate. It works as following: 1. Duplicate the dataframe using rbind. 2. Arrange at first on ID, secondly on from_date and third on the order of rows given in test. 3. in the even rows, change from_date to the first day of the new year. 4. In the odd rows, change to_date to the last day of the previous year. 5. Finally, exclude the rows in which the difference between from_date and to_date is only 1 second.

test %>% 
  rbind(test) %>% 
  arrange(ID, from_date) %>% 
  mutate(from_date = if_else(row_number() %% 2 == 0, ceiling_date(from_date, "year") + 1, from_date),
         to_date = if_else(row_number() %% 2 == 1, floor_date(to_date, "year") - 1, to_date)) %>% 
  filter(from_date - to_date != 1)

  ID Disease Pass Payment           from_date             to_date
1 10       P   US     110 2008-01-09 00:00:00 2008-12-31 23:59:59
2 10       P   US     110 2009-01-01 00:00:01 2009-01-08 00:00:00
3 10       P   US     110 2009-01-09 00:00:00 2009-12-31 23:59:59
4 10       P   US     110 2010-01-01 00:00:01 2010-01-08 00:00:00
5 10       P   US     115 2010-01-09 00:00:00 2010-12-31 23:59:59
6 10       P   US     115 2011-01-01 00:00:01 2011-01-08 00:00:00
7 12       D   EN     240 2008-01-01 00:00:01 2008-12-31 00:00:00
8 12       P   EN     255 2013-12-31 00:00:00 2013-12-31 23:59:59
9 12       P   EN     255 2014-01-01 00:00:01 2014-12-30 00:00:00

Only downside might be that times are added, but you could of course delete those. And in case a period might continue in a third year, you could use the same logic but with a second rbind and row_number() %% 3 == 0

  • I get an error: Error: Column from_date can't be modified because it's a grouping variable – Helen May 19 at 12:30
  • When you load test from your OP, there is no grouping variable. Else run ungroup first – Lennyy May 19 at 12:56
  • Oh, I think my lack of knowledge of dplyr is the issue here, sorry! How do I ungroup? – Helen May 19 at 13:16
  • 1
    @Erosennin just add ungroup() %>% below test %>% – gersht May 19 at 13:31
1

I am just using a data.table which also provides a yearfunction and ignore the possibly slow date conversion logic with as.POSIXct.

I am also assuming that the to_date and from_date may differ by one year only (not more than one year!).

library(data.table)  # also provides a "year" function

setDT(test)

# Create additional rows for the new year
additional_rows <- test[year(from_date) < year(to_date), ]
additional_rows[, from_date := as.POSIXct(paste0(year(to_date),"-01-01"))]

# Shorten the "from_date" of the affected original rows
test[year(from_date) < year(to_date), to_date := as.POSIXct(paste0(year(from_date),"-12-31"))]

# Create a combined data table as result
result <- rbind(test, additional_rows)
setkey(result, ID, Payment, from_date)  # just to sort the data like the "test_desired" sort order

which results in

> result
   ID Disease Pass Payment  from_date    to_date
1: 10       P   US     110 2008-01-09 2008-12-31
2: 10       P   US     110 2009-01-01 2009-01-08
3: 10       P   US     110 2009-01-09 2009-12-31
4: 10       P   US     110 2010-01-01 2010-01-08
5: 10       P   US     115 2010-01-09 2010-12-31
6: 10       P   US     115 2011-01-01 2011-01-08
7: 12       D   EN     240 2008-01-01 2008-12-31
8: 12       P   EN     255 2013-12-31 2013-12-31
9: 12       P   EN     255 2014-01-01 2014-12-30
  • I'm having difficulties testing this solution as I'm using dplyr and lubridate and loading data.table masks some functions that I am already using. – Helen May 19 at 12:25
  • What kind of difficulties (symptoms)? An "easy" solution is to modify the order of library statements (the package loaded first wins until you specify a function name with the package name, eg. data.table::year. So: Try to put library(data.table) at the end of all other library statements and it should work... – R Yoda May 19 at 14:43

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