2

I am currently creating a file copying facility that works on console. There are 3 basic classes that exist within this, the first one is the program itself which takes a source and destination and is as follows:

 class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Source:");
            string path = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.WriteLine("target:");

            string target = Console.ReadLine();


            Copy newCopy = new Copy();
            newCopy.CopyFunction(path, target);

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

The second class is the Copy.CS which is as follows:

class Copy

    {
        public void CopyFunction(string source, string destination)
        {
            string sourceFile = source;
            string destinationFile = destination;

            File.Copy(sourceFile, destinationFile);

            Console.Write("Files are being copied... ");
            using (var progress = new ProgressBar())
            {
                for (int i = 0; i <= 100; i++)
                {
                    progress.Report((double)i / 100);
                    Thread.Sleep(20);
                }
            }

            Console.WriteLine("File Copied");         

        }

    }

For the final class, I implemented the ProgressBar.cs class provided by @DanielWolf

https://gist.github.com/DanielSWolf/0ab6a96899cc5377bf54

The problem I'm currently facing is that the file copying function works, and so does the progress bar, but they work separately. For example, the console will spend a while on a blank screen while it processes what's happening, and then after it's completed, a quick animation of the progress bar is displayed.

I was wondering if I could synchronise the progress bar with the copying process so that it moves at a similar rate while it's happening?

2

To achieve what you want to do, you need to update the progress bar as you copy the file. One way to do this is simply to copy the file by chunks and report progress as each chunk is copied. I modified your CopyFunction to do just that. Enjoy!

class Copy

{
    public void CopyFunction(string sourcePath, string destinationPath)
    {
        byte[] buffer = new byte[1024 * 10]; // 10K buffer, you can change to larger size.

        using (var progress = new ProgressBar())
        using (FileStream source = new FileStream(sourcePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
        {
            long fileLength = source.Length;
            using (FileStream dest = new FileStream(destinationPath, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write))
            {
                long totalBytes = 0;
                int currentBlockSize = 0;

                while ((currentBlockSize = source.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
                {
                    totalBytes += currentBlockSize;
                    dest.Write(buffer, 0, currentBlockSize);
                    progress.Report((double)totalBytes / fileLength);

                }
                progress.Report((double)1.0);
            }

            //File.Copy(sourceFile, destinationFile);

            //Console.Write("Files are being copied... ");
            //using (var progress = new ProgressBar())
            //{
            //    for (int i = 0; i <= 100; i++)
            //    {
            //        progress.Report((double)i / 100);
            //        Thread.Sleep(20);
            //    }
            //}

            Console.WriteLine("File Copied");

        }
    }
}
  • Would this function of copying files be considered as a recursive algorithm by the way? I'm trying to understand that concept – zadders May 19 at 13:26
  • 1
    Check out the repeated mechanism. Is it the same method name, or loop of a kind? In this case you can see there's a 'while' loop, so it's not a recursion. Had it called itself it'd be recurring again and again with shrinking dataset (Hence a Recursion). The data must get 'smaller' so you could eventually get to a 'small' enough size you'd stop recurring and give a direct result. (I quoted small, because it could be the bigger - but closer to the exit condition) – Ori Nachum May 19 at 13:30
  • @OriNachum So would it be possible / hard to make the copy function that Robert suggestion into a recursive algorithm? – zadders May 19 at 13:32
  • It would be - any loop can technically be a recursion, but why? It doesn't give you any edge. This operation is linear in nature (You don't want to copy a file in parallel - a random chunk at a time), so the recursion would not have any purpose. You should know recursions are to be avoided if possible, because they tend to consume a lot of memory. – Ori Nachum May 19 at 13:54
  • @OriNachum I was given a task to make a recursive alogrithm for copying files just to ensure that I can demonstrate an understanding of it. I wouldn't expect this to need to be recursive but i'm trying to make it just because it was asked of me as a requirement. – zadders May 19 at 13:57

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