26

I have the same program written in both C++ and Java. For C++ I am using VS 2019 and for Java using Eclipse 2019-03.

Here is the program in C++.

#define InputSize 500000

int FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive(int* input, int size)
{
    int j;
    for (int i = 0; i < size-1; i++)
    {
        for ( j= i+1; j < size; j++)
        {
            if (input[i] == input[j])
                return input[i];
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

int* FindDuplicate::CreateTestCase(int size)
{
    int* output = new int[size];
    int i;
    for ( i= 0; i < size-1; i++)
    {
        output[i] = i + 1;
    }
    output[i] = i;
    return output;
}

int main()
{

    int* input= FindDuplicate::CreateTestCase(InputSize);
    auto start = std::chrono::system_clock::now();//clock start 
    int output = FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive(input, InputSize);
    auto end = std::chrono::system_clock::now();//clock end
    cout<<"Output is: "<<output<<endl;
    std::chrono::duration<double> elapsed_seconds = end - start;
    cout<< "elapsed time: " << elapsed_seconds.count() << "s\n";

}

Here is the Java program...

public class FindDuplicate {

public static int FindDuplicateNaive(int[] input) {
    for (int i = 0; i < input.length - 1; i++) {
        for (int j = i + 1; j < input.length; j++) {
            if (input[i] == input[j])
                return input[i];
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

    public static int[] CreateTestCase(int n) {
    // 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1 = n = 6
    int[] output = new int[n];
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < n - 1; i++) {
        output[i] = i + 1;
    }
    output[i] = i;
    return output;
}
    public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    //Here also args[0] is 5,00,000
    int number = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);

    int[] input = CreateTestCase(number);

    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

    int output = FindDuplicateNaive(input);

    long end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    System.out.println("Total time taken is: " + (end - start) / 1000.0 + " secs");

    System.out.println(output);
}

You will be shocked to know the time taken by the same program the same input in both c++ and Java.

In Java:

Toal time taken is: 41.876 secs
499999

In CPP:

After enabling the optimization and in release mode,

Output is: 499999
elapsed time: 64.0293s

Any thought on this, what could be the reason? Why Java is taking on 41.876 secs whereas CPP take 64.0293 sec??

  • 1
    Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Samuel Liew May 20 '19 at 9:24
  • A (truly acceptable) answer should include the assembly that is generated by the C++ compiler and the (final, optimized) result of what the Hotspot JIT generates. (A relevant excerpt of the latter is already contained in stackoverflow.com/a/56218736/3182664 ) – Marco13 May 20 '19 at 13:42
16

Since vectorisation cannot take place easily, most of the time is spent in loop control.
Thanks to the use of #pragma GCC unroll N on the inner loop, which helps investigating, loop unrolling provides an explanation of the OP's results.

I obtain these average results (console excluded from the timings):

gcc 8.3, -03, unroll 64    1.63s
gcc 8.3, -03, unroll 32    1.66s
gcc 8.3, -03, unroll 16    1.71s
gcc 8.3, -03, unroll 8     1.81s
gcc 8.3, -03, unroll 4     1.97s
gcc 8.3, -03, unroll 2     2.33s
gcc 8.3, -03, no unroll    3.06s
openjdk 10.0.2             1.93s

edit: these tests were run with InputSize=100'000 as in the original question (changed to 500'000 afterwards)

13

The main difference is loop unrolling.

Java unrolled the inner loop very cleverly, while GCC/clang/MSVC/ICC don't unroll it (this is a missed optimization of these compilers).

If you manually unroll the loop, you can speed it up to have the similar speed as the java version, something like this:

for ( j= i+1; j < size-3; j+=4)
{
    if (input[i] == input[j])
        return input[i];
    if (input[i] == input[j+1])
        return input[i];
    if (input[i] == input[j+2])
        return input[i];
    if (input[i] == input[j+3])
        return input[i];
}
for (; j < size; j++)
{
    if (input[i] == input[j])
        return input[i];
}

For proof, here's the inner loop of the java version (8x unroll):

  0x00007f13a5113f60: mov     0x10(%rsi,%rdx,4),%ebx  ;*iaload
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@25 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f64: cmp     %ebx,%ecx
  0x00007f13a5113f66: je      0x7f13a5113fcb    ;*if_icmpne
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@26 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f68: movsxd  %edx,%rdi
  0x00007f13a5113f6b: mov     0x14(%rsi,%rdi,4),%ebx  ;*iaload
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@25 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f6f: cmp     %ebx,%ecx
  0x00007f13a5113f71: je      0x7f13a5113fc9    ;*if_icmpne
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@26 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f73: mov     0x18(%rsi,%rdi,4),%ebx  ;*iaload
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@25 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f77: cmp     %ebx,%ecx
  0x00007f13a5113f79: je      0x7f13a5113fed    ;*if_icmpne
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@26 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f7b: mov     0x1c(%rsi,%rdi,4),%ebx  ;*iaload
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@25 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f7f: cmp     %ebx,%ecx
  0x00007f13a5113f81: je      0x7f13a5113ff2    ;*if_icmpne
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@26 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f83: mov     0x20(%rsi,%rdi,4),%ebx  ;*iaload
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@25 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f87: cmp     %ebx,%ecx
  0x00007f13a5113f89: je      0x7f13a5113ff7    ;*if_icmpne
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@26 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f8b: mov     0x24(%rsi,%rdi,4),%ebx  ;*iaload
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@25 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f8f: cmp     %ebx,%ecx
  0x00007f13a5113f91: je      0x7f13a5113ffc    ;*if_icmpne
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@26 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f93: mov     0x28(%rsi,%rdi,4),%ebx  ;*iaload
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@25 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f97: cmp     %ebx,%ecx
  0x00007f13a5113f99: je      0x7f13a5114001    ;*if_icmpne
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@26 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f9b: mov     0x2c(%rsi,%rdi,4),%ebx  ;*iaload
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@25 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113f9f: cmp     %ebx,%ecx
  0x00007f13a5113fa1: je      0x7f13a5114006    ;*if_icmpne
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@26 (line 6)

  0x00007f13a5113fa3: add     $0x8,%edx         ;*iinc
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@33 (line 5)

  0x00007f13a5113fa6: cmp     %r8d,%edx
  0x00007f13a5113fa9: jl      0x7f13a5113f60    ;*if_icmpge
                                                ; - FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive@17 (line 5)
9

This is not a complete answer, I cannot explain why it is actually running faster in Java than C++; but i can explain a couple of things that hold your C++ version performance back. Please don't select this as correct answer in case someone does have an actual explanation for the total difference in performance.

This answer has been discussed on meta and agreed that leaving it as a partial answer temporarily is the best option.


First and most important, as others mentioned in the comments, Java code is already optimized when you test it, whereas in C++ you have to specify optimization level as a command line argument (form visual studio ide compile as release), and while this makes a lot of difference, in my tests Java is still on top (all results on bottom).

But i want to point out a major flaw in your test, that may seem unsignificant in this specific case, since it makes little difference when you look at the numbers, but is still important: Input-output operations add noticeable delays. For an accurate execution-time comparison you must exclude input-output operations from your timer in both languages. Although in this case it makes little difference, having one language perform both the function and the output while the timer is running, and the other perform just the function, makes your whole test biased and pointless.

To have it more equivalent to the Java version, change your c++ main to

int main()
    {
    int* input = FindDuplicate::CreateTestCase(InputSize);   

    int result;
    auto start = std::chrono::system_clock::now(); //clock start 
    result = FindDuplicate::FindDuplicateNaive(input, InputSize);
    auto end = std::chrono::system_clock::now(); //clock end

    std::chrono::duration<double> elapsed_seconds = end - start;
    cout << "Output is: " << result << endl;
    cout << "elapsed time: " << elapsed_seconds.count() << "s\n";
    }

Note that by default C++'s console I/O (iostream, cin/cout) is even slower than it could be, because syncronization with C's console I/O (stdio, scanf/printf) is enabled to let a program not do weird things if both cout and printf are used. Here you can read about cout's performance when synchronization is turned off. Not only you used I/O inside your timer constraints, you even used it in its worst possible performance mode.

Here are my results, which while still giving Java an edge, shows how much difference certain compile options and I/O manipulations can make in C++ (for a single cout 0.03s of difference on average by turning syncronization off is bigger than it looks). All values in seconds are the average for 10 tests.

1. Java print in timer                   1.52s
2. Java                                  1.36s
3. C++  debug, cout in timer            11.78s
4. C++  debug                           11.73s
5. C++  release, cout in timer           3.32s
6. C++  release cout syncronization off  3.29s
7. C++  release                          3.26s

I want you to understand that out of all these tests the only ones of which a comparison would make sense is 1 with 6 and 2 with 7. All the others (3, 4, 5) would make for a biased comparison regardless of how many times you repeat the test.

  • 4
    IMHO, your answer does not rely on a real bench and measurements, which is quite a problem for a question on perfs. BTW, I did the test myself, And obtain the same result than the OP even with the IO removal from the time measurement, so this answer does not really answer the question. – OznOg May 19 '19 at 18:29
  • 2
    What happens if you use compiler flags to tell the C++ compiler to generate code using AVX2 instructions (/arch:AVX2, possibly with /favor:INTEL64)? – 1201ProgramAlarm May 20 '19 at 4:45
  • 1
    @1201ProgramAlarm: AFAIK, only ICC can auto-vectorize search loops, where the trip-count can't be calculated before the first iteration. gcc and clang can't, and IIRC MSVC can't either. I'm curious what machine code Java is actually JITing, but auto-vectorization with SSE2 could easily explain it. (We might get a factor of 4 speedup if the input fit in L2 cache; but 100k int32_t is bigger than the 256kiB L2 cache on typical x86 CPUs. Or a factor of maybe 8 with AVX2, if L2 cache can keep up.) But anyway, the factor of 2 speed diff could be Java using SIMD. – Peter Cordes May 20 '19 at 6:37
  • 3
    @1201ProgramAlarm: nope, MSVC doesn't auto-vectorize, and this code defeats even ICC godbolt.org/z/JZIyxy. Maybe just unrolling is how the JVM is winning; I know it does that (sometimes too aggressively). The loop could be bottlenecked on branch throughput, depending on the different microarchitectures Barnack and the OP are testing with. BTW, should be pretty easy to hand vectorize with intrinsics, though; you know where the end of the array is (so don't have to worry about out-of-bounds reads), and a search loop with _mm_cmpeq_epi32 and _mm_movemask_epi8 is a standard idiom. – Peter Cordes May 20 '19 at 7:11
  • 1
    Minor note: you can do int result = Find..., no need to first declare result and then assign it later. – Matthieu M. May 20 '19 at 7:29

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