13

I'm new to JavaScript so this is possibly a trivial question:

I'm trying to construct an object that stores a mapping from a set of integers to some of its methods, i.e. something like this:

'use strict';

function Foo() {
    this.funcs = {
        1: this.func1,
        2: this.func2,
    }
}

Foo.prototype.func1 = function() {
    this.prop = 1;
}

Foo.prototype.func2 = function() {
    this.prop = 2;
}

I'd then like to be able to call methods of Foo like this:

foo = new Foo();
var func = foo.funcs[1];
func();

But this results in: Cannot set property 'prop' of undefined, i.e. this does not refer to foo.

What's the problem here and is there a better way to implement this?

6

There are a few ways to achieve what you require, however the most robust approach is to bind() each function to the instance of Foo() that is being instantiated.

This can be done by passing this to bind() of each function:

this.func1.bind(this)

Using bind() in this way ensures that this, for func1 and func2 is defined as the instance of Foo(). This in turn ensures that this.prop can be accessed and assigned as expected:

'use strict';

function Foo() {
  this.funcs = {
    /* Bind the functions to this Foo() instance */
    1: this.func1.bind(this),
    2: this.func2.bind(this),
  }
}

Foo.prototype.func1 = function() {
  this.prop = 1;
  console.log('called func1. this.prop =', this.prop);
}

Foo.prototype.func2 = function() {
  this.prop = 2;
  console.log('called func2. this.prop =', this.prop);
}


const foo = new Foo();
var func = foo.funcs[1];
func();

foo.funcs[2]();

Another key thing to note is the bind() based approach above ensures that, if you acquire and call a reference to one of the functions on the funcs field as shown in your original post, that it will work as expected:

/* As per original post - doing this is not possible without .bind() */
var func = foo.funcs[1];
func();

Without the use of bind(), this method of acquiring and calling func will fail due to func not being bound to the instance of Foo.

  • Very clear answer, thanks! – Peter May 19 at 22:24
  • You're welcome - glad I could help :) – Dacre Denny May 19 at 22:34
7

Your problem is this line:

var func = foo.funcs[1];

JavaScript determines the value of this based on how a function is called. If you use dot notation, such as foo.funcs[1](); then the value of this will associated with the foo object. But when you run func(), that's just a plain function and this will have the default value of undefined.

It would be worth your time to read the two chapters of You Don't Know JS that discuss this. It should take less than an hour to learn, and you'll be way ahead of most JS programmers once you learn it.

The rules might not make sense until you read the chapter, but they are summarized below:

Determining the this binding for an executing function requires finding the direct call-site of that function. Once examined, four rules can be applied to the call-site, in this order of precedence:

Called with new? Use the newly constructed object.

Called with call or apply (or bind)? Use the specified object.

Called with a context object owning the call? Use that context object.

Default: undefined in strict mode, global object otherwise.

Based on the above rules, the code below is the simplest way you could get it to work the way you are expecting it to:

'use strict';

function Foo() {
  this.funcs = {
    1: this.func1,
    2: this.func2,
  }
}

Foo.prototype.func1 = function() {
  this.prop = 1;
  console.log('called func1. this.prop =', this.prop);
}

Foo.prototype.func2 = function() {
  this.prop = 2;
  console.log('called func2. this.prop =', this.prop);
}


const foo = new Foo();
foo.funcs[1]();

  • @DacreDenny yes that would fail. I thought I explained why in my answer? Without using dot notation you lose the contextual binding and it just becomes a regular function call. Is it unclear? – Todd Chaffee May 20 at 13:19
  • Hi there, it's a great answer - it just seemed that the solution for calling the function as requested in the op wasn't provided, but besides that it's very helpful 🙂 – Dacre Denny May 20 at 20:21
  • You already provided a solution using a reassigned function, so there was no reason for me to repeat that information. – Todd Chaffee May 20 at 21:06

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