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I have a toggle switch that displays/hides the next element using an onclick:

function toggleSwitch(z){
        var x,a;
        x=/(di-0)/i;
        if(x.test(z.d.nextElementSibling.attributes.getNamedItem('class').nodeValue)){a=1}else{a=0}
        switch (a){
            case 1:
                z.d.nextElementSibling.attributes.getNamedItem('class').nodeValue='di-2';
                break;
            case 0:
                z.d.nextElementSibling.attributes.getNamedItem('class').nodeValue='di-0';
                break;
            }
    }

How do I write a JavaScript that would possibly be compatible with most of the PC and Mobile browsers?

Demo

    function toggleSwitch(z){
        var x,a;
        x=/(di-0)/i;
        if(x.test(z.d.nextElementSibling.attributes.getNamedItem('class').nodeValue)){a=1}else{a=0}
        switch (a){
            case 1:
                z.d.nextElementSibling.attributes.getNamedItem('class').nodeValue='di-2';
                break;
            case 0:
                z.d.nextElementSibling.attributes.getNamedItem('class').nodeValue='di-0';
                break;
            }
    }
.di-0{display:none!important}.di-1{display:inline-block}.di-2{display:block}.di-3{display:grid}
    <div class="ro">
        <a href="#" class="s18 ro tx-1 b119 r100 t-21 p-2 br-5 mv-3" onclick="toggleSwitch({d:this});return false;" title="A latest quote">🎛 Average Daily Equilibrium Forecast: Monday, 13 May 2019 ⏱ 19:07 EDT</a>
        <div class="di-0">Display Some Content</div>
    </div>

1

If I understand it right, you can use the details and summary tags (both new in HTML5) for this purpose.

It's widely supported on both mobile and desktop browsers, except the pseudo-browsers Internet Explorer, Edge and Edge Mobile.

Well, JavaScript comes to the rescue if we want to make sure that our toggle thing works on both real and pseudo-browsers. (Sorry jQuery, not this time. You can save the world another time.)

Solution with JavaScript without jQuery

Notes:

  1. Using the anchor element (a) is not a good idea, since it has another semantic and functional meaning. You can use a button element for instance, which fits better both in semantic and functional sense. However, becausue there is additional work for making a button looks nicer, I just replaced the a with a div element instead. You can also use the cursor: pointer CSS property for this div to achieve the same visual effect like the a has.

  2. You should avoid ambiguous named variables. For better readability and easier maintenance in the future, always give your variables a meaningful name.

  3. I renamed the function toggleSwitch as toggleNext, since it tells more about the purpose of the button. Further you can simply work with Java Script Events, if you want to access the source DOM element via event.target

  4. The toggleNext function has an additional optional parameter called display. Which is by default block, and used to set the visible display state of the next sibling element. It should give you more playroom, since you can simply pass the display value for an arbitrary sibling element like toggleNext(event, 'grid')

  5. In the toggleNext(event, display) function, we first get the siblingElem from our reference element (event.target) and then check whether its display property has the 'none' value, if so then we need to toggle the state by simply assigning a new display value to that element.

  6. In the initial state siblingElem.style.display has the value null, thus we check !siblingElem.style.display, this is necessary for the first time.

    • In JavaScript !null and !undefined are resolved as truthy
    • More information about truthy and falsy
  7. For the sake of clarity, I removed the classes (s18 ro tx-1 b119 r100 t-21 p-2 br-5 mv-3) from the div element you provided in your OP.

<div class="ro">
  <div class="toggle-button" onclick="toggleNext(event)" title="A latest quote">
    🎛  Average Daily Equilibrium Forecast: Monday, 13 May 2019 ⏱ 19:07 EDT
  </div>
  <div>Display Some Content</div>
</div>
/* Display pointer on hover */
.toggle-button {
  cursor: pointer;
}

/* Hide the next sibling element - does not matter what type it is */
.toggle-button + * {
  display: none;
}
function toggleNext(event, display) {
  var siblingElem = event.target.nextElementSibling;

  if (!siblingElem) return;

  display = display || 'block';

  if (!siblingElem.style.display || siblingElem.style.display === 'none') {
    siblingElem.style.display = display;
  } else {
    siblingElem.style.display = 'none';
  }
}

Stackblitz: https://stackblitz.com/edit/emma-toggle-2-1?file=index.html

Now you have even more playroom, you can logically tie one toggle button to another one like so:

<div class="ro">
  <div class="toggle-button" onclick="toggleNext(event)" title="A latest quote">
    🎛  Average Daily Equilibrium Forecast: Monday, 13 May 2019 ⏱ 19:07 EDT
  </div>
  <div>
    Display Some Content

    <div class="toggle-button" onclick="toggleNext(event)" title="A latest quote">
      🎛    Average Daily Equilibrium Forecast: Monday, 13 May 2019 ⏱ 19:07 EDT
    </div>
    <div>
      Display Some Another Content
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Stackblitz: https://stackblitz.com/edit/emma-toggle-2-2?file=index.html


Solution without JavaScript (<details>)

<details>
  <summary>🎛 Average Daily Equilibrium Forecast: Monday, 13 May 2019 ⏱ 19:07 EDT</summary>
  Display 
  Some 
  Content
  💚
</details>
<br>
<details>
  <summary>Another entry: Monday, 13 May 2019 ⏱ 19:07 EDT</summary>
  <h1>Display some other content</h1>
</details>

Stackblitz: https://stackblitz.com/edit/emma-toggle-1-1?file=index.html

Further, you can also nest a details into another details tag:

<details>
  <summary>🎛 Average Daily Equilibrium Forecast: Monday, 13 May 2019 ⏱ 19:07 EDT</summary>
  <details>
    <summary>
      Display  Some  Content
    </summary>
    <h1>Display some other content</h1>
  </details>
</details>

Stackblitz: https://stackblitz.com/edit/emma-toggle-1-2?file=index.html

Last but not least, you can hide the showed arrow that is displayed by default for the <details> tag, if you wish:

  /* this is for Chrome */
  details summary::-webkit-details-marker {
    display:none;
  }
  /* this is for Firefox */
  details summary {
    list-style-type: none;
  }

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