5

There is a challenge on codewars that asks you to check whether a string of parentheses, brackets, and curly braces is valid.

A string of braces is considered valid if all braces are matched with the correct brace.

I.e. "()" is valid and "[(])" is not.

"(){}[]" is valid and "[({})](]" is not. Etc.

I've been able to create some logic to check for whether or not there are the right number of opening and closing braces.

ATTEMPT:

function validBraces(braces) {

  let parenCount = 0;
  let squareBracketCount = 0;
  let curlyBraceCount = 0;

    for (let i =0; i < braces.length; i++) {
      let character = braces[i];
        if (character === "(") {
          parenCount -= 1;
          }
        if (character === ")") {
          parenCount += 1;
          }
        if (character === "[") {
          squareBracketCount -= 1;
          }
        if (character === "]") {
          squareBracketCount += 1;
        }
        if (character === "{") {
          curlyBraceCount -= 1;
        }
        if (character === "}") {
          curlyBraceCount += 1;
        }
      }
      if (parenCount === 0 && squareBracketCount === 0 && curlyBraceCount === 0) {
        return true;
      } 
      else {
        return false;
      }
}

But I've not been able to come up with a way to check for whether or not the opening brace "closes" before the next type of brace opens.

Maybe something like this?

if (
  (firstChar === "(" && lastChar === ")") ||
  (firstChar === "{" && lastChar === "}") ||
  (firstChar === "[" && lastChar === "]")
) {
  return true;
} else {
  return false;
}

But then this would have to be checked in accordance with my other if-statement...(?)

EDIT: Key to understanding this challenge is that the closing brace must either come directly after the opening brace or it must be "parallel" - in symmetry with the other.

  • 2
    Just a hint, you'll need to keep track of when you enter a brace and when you exit the proper brace. – ChaosPandion May 20 '19 at 2:11
  • 1
    As @ChaosPandion says, you may want to push each opening brace onto a stack and check that each closing brace matches the most recent opener before popping it off the stack. If the closing brace doesn't match, return false. At the end of the string the stack should have length zero. – ray hatfield May 20 '19 at 2:26
2

You can use array to keep track of previously appeared opening braces and once any closing tag appears you need to match it with the last value of array if it's matching pop the last value out of else else return false, in the end if you're left with empty array return true else return false

function validBraces(braces){
  let tracer = []
  for(let i=0;i < braces.length; i++){
    if ( braces[i] === "(" || braces[i] === "{" || braces[i] === "["){
      tracer.push(braces[i])
    } else{
      if(tracer.length === 0) return false
      let lastValue = tracer[tracer.length-1]
      if( (braces[i] === ']' && lastValue === '[') || (braces[i] === '}' && lastValue === '{') || (braces[i] === ')' && lastValue === '('))
      {
        tracer.pop()
      } else {
        break;
      }
    }
  }
  return tracer.length === 0
}


console.log(validBraces( "()" )) // true
console.log(validBraces( "[]" )) // true
console.log(validBraces( "{}" )) // true
console.log(validBraces( "(){}[]" )) // true
console.log(validBraces( "([{}])" )) // true
console.log(validBraces( "(}" )) // false
console.log(validBraces( "[(])" )) // false
console.log(validBraces( "({})[({})]" )) // true
console.log(validBraces( "(})" )) // false
console.log(validBraces( "(({{[[]]}}))" )) //true
console.log(validBraces( "{}({})[]" )) // true
console.log(validBraces( ")(}{][" )) // false
console.log(validBraces( "())({}}{()][][" )) // false
console.log(validBraces( "(((({{" ))  // false
console.log(validBraces( "}}]]))}])" )) // false

| improve this answer | |
  • Hello can you please explain why you have return tracer.length === 0; and what that is doing, exactly? What is the difference between that and if (tracer.length === 0) return true;? – HappyHands31 Jul 2 '19 at 17:47
  • I see now that, in fact, there is no difference between return tracer.length === 0; and if (tracer.length === 0) {return true}; else {return false}; - return tracer.length === 0; returns a boolean. – HappyHands31 Jul 9 '19 at 1:32
  • 1
    @HappyHands31 === ( equality operator ) always evaluates to a Boolean value, so depending on length it will return a Boolean value – Code Maniac Jul 9 '19 at 1:34
1

You don't really need to use arrays here, you can just use regex and recursion:

const regex = /\(\)|\[\]|\{\}/;
const validBraces = braces => regex.test(braces)
  ? validBraces(braces.replace(regex, ''))
  : '' === braces

console.log(validBraces('{{}}')) // true
console.log(validBraces('{{[]}}')) // true
console.log(validBraces('{[{}]}')) // true
console.log(validBraces('({{}})')) // true
console.log(validBraces('{[()]}')) // true
console.log(validBraces('{{}[}')) // false
console.log(validBraces('{{]}}')) // false
console.log(validBraces('{}}')) // false
console.log(validBraces('{({}}')) // false
console.log(validBraces('((}}')) // false
console.log(validBraces('}[)}')) // false

| improve this answer | |
1

function validBraces(braces){
 while(/\(\)|\[\]|\{\}/g.test(braces)){braces = braces.replace(/\(\)|\[\]|\{\}/g,"")}
 return !braces.length;
}

// double regex 

| improve this answer | |
0

I hope my code can help you

    function validBraces( braces ) {
        braces = braces.split( "" );
        var string = ["(","[","{","}","]",")"];

        if( braces.length % 2 == 0 ) {
            for( let i = 0; i < ( string.length / 2 ); i++ ) {
                if( braces.indexOf( string[i] ) != -1) {
                    for( let a = 0; a < braces.length; a++ ){
                        if( braces[a] == string[ ( string.length - 1 ) - i ] &&  ( a + braces.indexOf( string[i]) ) % 2 != 0 ) {
                            while( string[ ( string.length - 1 ) - i ] != -1 && braces.indexOf( string[i]) != -1 &&  a > braces.indexOf( string[i] ) ) {
                                braces.splice( braces.indexOf( string[i]), 1 );
                                braces.splice( braces.indexOf( string[ ( string.length - 1 ) - i ] ), 1 );
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
                if( braces.length == 0 ) {
                    return true
                }
            }
        }

        return false
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • While this code may provide a solution to the question, it's better to add context as to why/how it works. This can help future users learn, and apply that knowledge to their own code. You are also likely to have positive feedback from users in the form of upvotes, when the code is explained. – borchvm Jul 31 at 11:40
0

In scala you can do this

object Kata {

  def validBraces(s: String): Boolean =
    s.replace("()", "").replace("[]", "").replace("{}", "") match { case "" => true; case `s` => false; case x => validBraces(x) }
}
| improve this answer | |

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