0

I'm trying to get a function to take a string and print each character in the string in unicode separated by a space. This is all I was able to get:

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    for ch in s:
        return ord(ch)

This gives me the output:

Expected:
    '97 98 99 '
Got:
    97

Expected:
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
Got:
    97

I can't figure out how to get each one? I thought of using str.split() but I didn't think that would work properly.

I would appreciate any help.

3

return exits the function, so you should create a list and keep appending to it:

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    l = []
    for ch in s:
        l.append(str(ord(ch)))
    return ' '.join(l)

Even better:

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    return ' '.join([str(ord(ch)) for ch in s])

Or without calling, printing, and assuming python 3 (just add a from __future__ import print_function at the top of the file in python 2):

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    for ch in s:
        print(ord(ch), end=' ')
    print()

And assuming python 3 again (do the same as above if python 2, from __future__ import print_function at the top of the file):

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    [print(ord(ch), end=' ') for ch in s]

And now in the first two cases:

print(get_ords('abc'))

Output:

97 98 99

And now in the last two cases:

get_ords('abc')

Output:

97 98 99
  • 1
    Thanks for this. I just haven't learnt about appending and joining as of yet in my class, so wasn't sure of how to do this. – puppyonkik May 20 at 8:56
  • 1
    @puppyonkik Remember to accept and up-vote if it works :-) – U9-Forward May 20 at 8:57
  • 1
    Could also print(" ".join(str(ord(ch)) for ch in s)) – Adam Feor May 20 at 8:57
  • 2
    @AdamFeor Will edit – U9-Forward May 20 at 8:58
  • 1
    @puppyonkik check the first two examples, they do it. – U9-Forward May 20 at 9:15
2

return is only called once in a function.

You can either

  1. Create a local variable that stores all of your output, like so:
def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    ret = []
    for ch in s:  
        ret.append(ord(ch))
    return ' '.join(ret)  # or skip the for loop using a list comprehension here
  1. Use yield to define a generator
def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    yield ord(ch)

x = get_ords(s)

for y in x:
    print(y)
  • Alec, little slower than me... :-) – U9-Forward May 20 at 8:55
  • 1
    you're way too fast lol – Alec Alameddine May 20 at 8:57
  • Haha lol :-) just reached 20k today. – U9-Forward May 20 at 8:58
1

Good time to learn comprehensions. They are both shorter to write and often more efficient that iteratively growing an array:

def get_ords(s):
    """
    >>> get_ords('abc')
    '97 98 99 '
    >>> get_ords('a b c')
    '97 32 98 32 99 '
    """
    return ' '.[ord(c) for s in c]
1

You can simply do this:

def get_ords(s):
    return ' '.join([str(ord(ch)) for ch in s])
1

As already pointed you might use list-comprehension for that. As already noted only one return in every function run is executed, so if you wish to fire return more than once you need to arrange your function in recursive manner that is:

def get_ords(s):
    if len(s)>=2:
        return f"{ord(s[0])} "+get_ords(s[1:])
    else:
        return f"{ord(s[0])}"
print(get_ords('abc')) # 97 98 99
print(get_ords('a b c')) # 97 32 98 32 99

Above code uses so-called f-strings (tutorial) available in Python 3.6 onwards. Naturally this is much less readable than list-comprehension method, however in some use cases recursion is useful.

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