15

The bool data type is commonly represented as 0 (as false) and 1 (as true). However, some say that true values can be represented by a value other than 1. If the later statement is true, then the following expression may be incorrect.

bool x = 1;
if (x==1)
    Do something..

I am wondering if the following statements would work as desired and expected on commonly used compilers.

  1.  

    bool x = 1;
    if (x==1)
        Do something.
    
  2.  

    bool y = 0;
    if (y>0.5)
        Do something..
    
  3.  

    bool z = 1;
    if(z>0.5)
        Do something...
    
  • 6
    This implicit conversion reference might be helpful to read. – Some programmer dude May 20 at 9:46
  • 1
    According to the boolean conversions rules: "The value zero (for integral, floating-point, and unscoped enumeration) and the null pointer and the null pointer-to-member values become false. All other values become true." – vahancho May 20 at 9:48
  • 3
    The conversions to and from bool do not depend on how a bool is represented. Your code will work even if true is represented as 39 and false as 10003. – molbdnilo May 20 at 10:04
  • 1
    My gut feeling is that there's something deeper behind this question. Maybe not about the implicit conversions, which can be looked up and argued about based on the spec, but rather about the "actual representation". Maybe what happens during hacky contortions along the lines of double x = *(reinterpret_cast<double*>>(&someBool)); (i.e. when brutally exposing the actual representation - not sure about the exact syntax from the tip of my head, or whether it causes UB at some point...) – Marco13 May 20 at 13:50
  • 1
    FWIW, it's looking likely that this paper will make its way into the standard, at which point 0 and 1 will be the only allowed representations of true and false. – chris May 20 at 14:46
13

§4.5 of the C++ standard says:

An rvalue of type bool can be converted to an rvalue of type int, with false becoming zero and true becoming one.

regarding 2 and 3, type conversion takes place so the statements will work as desired

  • 4
    Where is this quotation from? – Brian May 20 at 14:52
  • 2
    @Brian: C++ is formally documented by an ISO standard (14882). So on Stack Overflow, such quotations that omit the source document are assumed to reference the then-current C++ Standard. As this is a 2019 answer, that means the quote is from ISO 14882:2017 (aka C++17). – MSalters May 20 at 15:07
  • 5
    @MSalters I know for a fact this is not from ISO 14882:2017. – Brian May 20 at 15:07
  • 3
    I suspect it's from the C++03 standard, but I don't have a copy handy to check. – Brian May 20 at 15:08
  • This text only specifies what the conversion does, not when it is applied. Some of OP's examples convert bool to float, not bool to int. The specification for each operator specifies which conversions are applicable to that situation. – M.M May 20 at 23:15
9

According to the rule of Boolean conversions:

A prvalue of integral, floating-point, unscoped enumeration, pointer, and pointer-to-member types can be converted to a prvalue of type bool.

The value zero (for integral, floating-point, and unscoped enumeration) and the null pointer and the null pointer-to-member values become false. All other values become true.

Then

bool x = 1; // x will be true
bool y = 0; // y will be false
bool z = 1; // z will be true

For the 1st case, if (x==1), x will be promoted to int,

the type bool can be converted to int with the value false becoming ​0​ and true becoming 1.

then (x==1) is true.

For the second case, if (y>0.5), y will be promoted to int with value 0, then converted to double for the comparison;

If the operands has arithmetic or enumeration type (scoped or unscoped), usual arithmetic conversions are performed on both operands following the rules for arithmetic operators. The values are compared after conversions:

and

If the operand passed to an arithmetic operator is integral or unscoped enumeration type, then before any other action (but after lvalue-to-rvalue conversion, if applicable), the operand undergoes integral promotion.

...

  • Otherwise, if either operand is double, the other operand is converted to double

then y>0.5 is false.

For the third case, if (z>0.5), z will be promoted to int with value 1, then converted to double for the comparison; then z>0.5 is true.

  • 1
    "y will be promoted to int with value 0" - this is incorrect. y will be converted to double. As covered by your quote "Otherwise, if either operand is double, the other operand is converted to double". (> is not an arithmetic operator). Same goes for z – M.M May 20 at 13:17
  • @M.M Shouldn't integral promotion be performed firstly? As I quoted "If the operand passed to an arithmetic operator is integral ... then before any other action ... the operand undergoes integral promotion." – songyuanyao May 20 at 14:47
  • > is not an arithmetic operator – M.M May 20 at 23:14
  • @M.M Yes, but I think the rule is the same. "If the operands has arithmetic or enumeration type (scoped or unscoped), usual arithmetic conversions are performed on both operands following the rules for arithmetic operators. The values are compared after conversions:" – songyuanyao May 21 at 0:21
  • Your quote in your last comment is correct, and the behaviour of "usual arithmetic conversions" is quoted in your answer, namely "Otherwise, if either operand is double, the other operand is converted to double" – M.M May 21 at 1:15
6

if (x==1) is not incorrect. All true value representations are converted to 1 when you convert a boolean to a numeric type.

Given bool z=true, if(z>0.5) will be true, because 1.0 is greater than 0.5.

4

bool has only two values, and they are true and false. 1 and 0 are integer literals and as such they can be converted to bool. You have to consider that the conversion works in both directions, but you do not necessarily get back the same integer:

int a = 5;
bool b = a; // int -> bool conversion
int c = b;  // bool -> int conversion
std::cout << a << " " c;

prints:

5 1

Any integer value other than 0 gets converted to true, but true gets always converted to 1.

Keeping this in mind, all your examples will work as expected. However, note that bools main purpose is that we can use true and false in our code instead of having to give numbers as 0 and 1 special meaning. It is always better to be explicit, so when you mean true you better write true not 1.

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