5

While removing rows that are duplicates in two particular columns, is it possible to preferentially retain one of the duplicate rows based upon a third column?

Consider the following example:

# Example dataframe.
df <- data.frame(col.1 = c(1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3),
                 col.2 = c(1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2),
                 col.3 = c('b', 'c', 'a', 'b', 'a', 'b', 'c'))
# Output
col.1 col.2 col.3
    1     1     b
    1     1     c
    1     1     a
    2     2     b
    2     2     a
    2     2     b
    3     2     c

I would like to remove rows that are duplicates in both col.1 and col.2, while always keeping the duplicate row that has col.3 == 'a', otherwise having no preference for the duplicate row that is retained. In the case of this example, the resultant data frame would look like this:

# Output.
col.1 col.2 col.3
    1     1     a
    2     2     a
    3     2     c

All help is appreciated!

5 Answers 5

5

We can order first on col.3 and remove duplicates, i.e.

d1 <- df[with(df, order(col.3)),]
d1[!duplicated(d1[c(1, 2)]),]
#  col.1 col.2 col.3
#3     1     1     a
#5     2     2     a
#7     3     2     c
3

Since you want to retain a one option is to arrange them and get the 1st row in each group.

library(dplyr)

df %>%
  arrange_all() %>%
  group_by(col.1, col.2) %>%
  slice(1)

#  col.1 col.2 col.3
#  <dbl> <dbl> <fct>
#1     1     1 a    
#2     2     2 a    
#3     3     2 c    

If the col.3 values are not sequential, you can manually arrange them by doing

df %>%
  arrange(col.1, col.2, match(col.3, c("a", "b", "c"))) %>%
  group_by(col.1, col.2) %>%
  slice(1)
2
  • Thank you! The manual arrangement option is great, but I do not have a preference beyond col.3 == 'a'
    – Lorcán
    Commented May 20, 2019 at 14:07
  • 1
    @Lorcán you could do df %>% arrange(col.1, col.2, match(col.3, c("a", setdiff("a", unique(col.3))))) %>% group_by(col.1, col.2) %>% slice(1) but I think akrun's match is much better.
    – Ronak Shah
    Commented May 20, 2019 at 14:15
3

With dplyr, you can also do:

df %>%
 group_by(col.1, col.2) %>%
 filter(col.3 == min(col.3))

  col.1 col.2 col.3
  <dbl> <dbl> <chr>
1     1     1 a    
2     2     2 a    
3     3     2 c 

Or:

df %>%
 group_by(col.1, col.2) %>%
 filter(dense_rank(col.3) == 1)

Or:

df %>%
 group_by(col.1, col.2) %>%
 slice(which.min(match(col.3, letters[1:26])))
1

An option would be to group by 'col.1', 'col.2' and slice the row that has 'col.3' as "a" if the number of rows are greater than 1 or else return the first row

library(dplyr)
df %>% 
   group_by(col.1, col.2) %>%
   slice(if(n() > 1) which(col.3 == 'a') else 1)
# A tibble: 3 x 3
# Groups:   col.1, col.2 [3]
#  col.1 col.2 col.3
#  <dbl> <dbl> <fct>
#1     1     1 a    
#2     2     2 a    
#3     3     2 c    

Or another option is to group by 'col.1', 'col.2', then slice the index we get from matching the 'a' with 'col.3'. if there is nomatch, we return the index 1.

df %>% 
   group_by(col.1, col.2) %>% 
   slice(match("a", col.3, nomatch = 1))
# A tibble: 3 x 3
# Groups:   col.1, col.2 [3]
#  col.1 col.2 col.3
#  <dbl> <dbl> <fct>
#1     1     1 a    
#2     2     2 a    
#3     3     2 c    
1
  • 1
    I believe the second option you provided is the closest to what I wanted. It allows me to change the value I prefer, without having to designate a preference for all the values that could exist in col.3. Thank you!
    – Lorcán
    Commented May 20, 2019 at 14:10
1

you can use dplyr::distinct, it features a .keep.all parameter that allows you to keep the entire first row for each distinct set. First we need to sort to put "a" on top :

library(dplyr)
df %>%
  arrange(col.1, col.2, col.3 != "a") %>%
  distinct(col.1, col.2, .keep_all = TRUE)
#>   col.1 col.2 col.3
#> 1     1     1     a
#> 2     2     2     a
#> 3     3     2     c

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