102

How can I programmatically turn a class name, FooBar, into a symbol, :foo_bar? e.g. something like this, but that handles camel case properly?

FooBar.to_s.downcase.to_sym

4 Answers 4

151

Rails comes with a method called underscore that will allow you to transform CamelCased strings into underscore_separated strings. So you might be able to do this:

FooBar.name.underscore.to_sym

But you will have to install ActiveSupport just to do that, as ipsum says.

If you don't want to install ActiveSupport just for that, you can monkey-patch underscore into String yourself (the underscore function is defined in ActiveSupport::Inflector):

class String
  def underscore
    word = self.dup
    word.gsub!(/::/, '/')
    word.gsub!(/([A-Z]+)([A-Z][a-z])/,'\1_\2')
    word.gsub!(/([a-z\d])([A-Z])/,'\1_\2')
    word.tr!("-", "_")
    word.downcase!
    word
  end
end
7
  • 1
    Thanks. I was afraid this was a Rails extension. :) No worries, as I am actually using Rails. Apr 11, 2011 at 14:25
  • 2
    Then you should have tagged your question accordingly. Here, let me do it for you...
    – kikito
    Apr 11, 2011 at 14:31
  • 5
    No, not ActiveRecord. ActiveSupport. Apr 11, 2011 at 17:15
  • @user1406062 open another question for that.
    – kikito
    May 27, 2013 at 7:35
  • What about plus__priced_item to give Plus::PricedItem (namespace involved)? I use 'plus::_priced_items' but it feels so wrong
    – MrYoshiji
    Sep 22, 2015 at 16:16
81

Rails 4 .model_name

In Rails 4, it returns an ActiveModel::Name object which contains many useful more "semantic" attributes such as:

FooBar.model_name.param_key
#=> "foo_bar"

FooBar.model_name.route_key
#=> "foo_bars"

FooBar.model_name.human
#=> "Foo bar"

So you should use one of those if they match your desired meaning, which is likely the case. Advantages:

  • easier to understand your code
  • your app will still work even in the (unlikely) event that Rails decides to change a naming convention.

BTW, human has the advantage of being I18N aware.

2
  • model_name also works for instance objects. Ex: foo_bar.model_name. If you want the full list write foo_bar.model_name.inspect in rails console or your debugger
    – ivanxuu
    Sep 8, 2016 at 9:31
  • and I was looking for the opposite/reverse, classify, modelize didn't seem to work.
    – Pysis
    Jul 16, 2020 at 19:49
9

first: gem install activesupport

require 'rubygems'
require 'active_support'
"FooBar".underscore.to_sym
1
  • Should be FooBar.to_s.underscore.to_sym, since I'm trying to convert a class (which is a constant) into a symbol, which I can then feed to Factory Girl. :) Apr 11, 2011 at 14:31
2

Here's what I went for:

module MyModule
  module ClassMethods
    def class_to_sym  
      name_without_namespace = name.split("::").last
      name_without_namespace.gsub(/([^\^])([A-Z])/,'\1_\2').downcase.to_sym
    end
  end

  def self.included(base)
    base.extend(ClassMethods)
  end
end

class ThisIsMyClass
  include MyModule
end 

ThisIsMyClass.class_to_sym #:this_is_my_class
2
  • 3
    ActiveSupport has String#demodulize which will remove the part before ::.
    – amoebe
    Sep 29, 2015 at 11:07
  • 1
    @amoebe - thanks for the info. Depends on what your working on though - you may not be working on a rails app (or even a web app). Sep 29, 2015 at 20:14

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