1

I want to write something in C++, and although I have the idea and I have tried to write it I don't achieve how to do it.

Explanation

Imagine that I have a vector<int> that we define eveytime we run our program. Its name is mainVector This vector will have a random number of ints. And every int will have a property.

For example, we have the vector with the following values: vector<int> mainVector {1, 3, 15, 33, 35, 42, 57, 69, 73}; and we have another vector<int> which describe the properties of every element in mainVector upon the position of the element, called properties for example: vector<int> properties {1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3}

What I want now, is to divide the first vector in as many smaller vectors as different properties exist. For example, in the last case, I would have three new vectors: Vector with elements with property 1: 1, 3, 15; vector with elements with property 2: 33, 35, 42; and vector with elements with property 3: 57, 69, 73.

The problem is that I don't know how to define this, cause the first vector can be different everytime we execute our code.

Here I attached you the code with my ideas:

do
{
    for(int t=0;t<mainVector.size();t++) // id tables
    {
        string Vect("Vector");
        Vect +=t;
        vector<int> Vect

        for(int u=0;u<mainVector.size();u++)
      {
            if(properties.at(u) & t)
            {
               Vect.push_back(mainVector.at(u)); // I know this is not correct but I hope you understand what I mean
            }
        }
    }
}

Thanks in advance to all of you!!! :)

Clarification

Something important that I want to clarify: mainVector is already a subvector of another bigger vector that has been defined thanks to an imput. bigVector <int> is {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, ...., 99, 100, 101, ..., n} and vector <int> properties is a vector, actually, as big a bigvector that can be different in any case, so for example, in one execution i can be {1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, ..., 1, 1, 2, ... 2} and ion another moment {1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, ..., 26, 26, 27, 49} so I think I can't do a vector of vectors as some of you are recommending, any idea??

Thanks once more!!!

6 Answers 6

2

You could use a std::map<int, std::vector<int>> to track each property and the numbers associated with that property. E.g.:

typedef std::vector<int> vec_t;
typedef std::map<int, vec_t> map_t;

// the real work
map_t propMap;
for (vec_t::size_type i = 0u, i_end = mainVector.size(); i != i_end; ++i)
    propMap[properties[i]].push_back(mainVector[i]);

// printing the results
for (map_t::const_iterator miter = propMap.begin(), miter_end = propMap.end();
        miter != miter_end;
        ++miter)
{
    std::cout << "all numbers with property value of " << miter->first << ':';
    for (vec_t::const_iterator viter = miter->second.begin(), viter_end = miter->second.end();
            viter != viter_end;
            ++viter)
    {
        std::cout << ' ' << *viter;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

Prints (for the example data you've given):

all numbers with property value of 1: 1 3 15
all numbers with property value of 2: 33 35 42
all numbers with property value of 3: 57 69 73

3
  • Thanks for your answer. It looks quite complex to my still initial level of C++, but I think I have understood. Anyway, I have just clarified my question, could you check it please and tell me if you think your answer is still valid?? Would it be a simpler way to write it?? Thanks in advance! :)
    – thomas
    Apr 11, 2011 at 14:45
  • @thomas : The only requirement here is that mainVector and properties have identical lengths. Beyond that, I'm not sure what all your clarification changes...
    – ildjarn
    Apr 11, 2011 at 14:52
  • @thomas : Also note that the code for actually creating the new vectors is only 3 lines long (the the real work comment). Does 3 lines really need to be simplified further? ;-] (The rest of the code is for printing the results out, so its level of complexity seems irrelevant.)
    – ildjarn
    Apr 11, 2011 at 14:59
2

You could count the number of different types in the "properties" vector and create a vector of vectors( vector<vector<int>> ). Then loop over the second vector and add the points of the first vector into the corresponding index of the new vector structure.

Something like:

bool Contains(vector<int> x, int value)
{
    bool bContains = false;
    for(int ii=0; ii<x.size(); ++ii)
    {
        if(x[ii] == value)
        {
            bContains = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    return bContains;
}

int GetIndex(vector<int> x, int value)
{
    int nIdx = -1;
    for(int ii=0; ii<x.size(); ++ii)
    {
        if(x[ii] == value)
        {
            nIdx = ii;
            break;
        }
    }

    return nIdx;
}

int main()
{
    const int SIZE=10;

    vector<int> x(SIZE);
    vector<int> y(SIZE);
    for(int ii=0; ii<SIZE; ++ii)
    {
        x[ii] = ii*SIZE+4;

        if(ii < SIZE/2)
            y[ii] = 0;
        else
            y[ii] = ii/3;
    }

    vector<int> unique(SIZE, -1);
    int nCount = 0;
    for(int ii=0; ii<y.size(); ++ii)
    {
        if(!Contains(unique, y[ii]))
            unique[nCount++] = y[ii];
    }
    unique.resize(nCount);

    vector<vector<int>> answer(nCount);
    for(int ii=0; ii<y.size(); ++ii)
        answer[GetIndex(unique, y[ii])].push_back(x[ii]);

    return 0;
}
3
  • Thanks for your answer. I have just clarified my question, because I think I can't do it with a vector<vector<int>> as you recommend. Have a look and tell me if you have any idea how to do it! Thanks :)
    – thomas
    Apr 11, 2011 at 14:38
  • I still think a vector of vectors should work. Can you try to rephrase it again... describe what you want to do with the data? What do you want to do with this new "object" of sub-vectors?
    – Jess
    Apr 11, 2011 at 15:22
  • I've edited the solution above... not sure if that is what you are looking for?
    – Jess
    Apr 11, 2011 at 16:31
0

You can use a vector of vector of int, that is vector< vector< int > >.

1
  • Thanks for your answer. I have just clarified my question, because I think I can't do it with a vector<vector<int>> as you recommend. Have a look and tell me if you have any idea how to do it! Thanks :)
    – thomas
    Apr 11, 2011 at 14:39
0

It sounds like you should either make a vector that contains a custom class or a vector of pairs

vector<pair<int, int> >

This will allow you to sort the vector without the possibility of the properties getting mismatched.

1
  • Thanks for your answer. I have just clarified my question, because I think I can't do it with a vector<pair<int, int> > as you recommend. Have a look and tell me if you have any idea how to do it! Thanks :)
    – thomas
    Apr 11, 2011 at 14:40
0

You could set up a map from int to vector<int>, where the key is the value of the property and the value is the sub-vector containing all elements with that property.

1
  • Thanks for your answer. I have just clarified my question, because I think I can't do it with a map from int to vector<int>/ Actually, I have never worked with map, although I have tried, but I;ve never got what I wanted. :S Have a look at my clarification and tell me if you have any idea how to do it! Thanks :)
    – thomas
    Apr 11, 2011 at 14:41
0

There are algorithms available already to do what you're trying to do.

If you want to make a copy of all the elements in mainVector to another vector results which satisfy a predicate, while leaving mainVector unchanged, you can use copy_if:

copy_if( mainVector.begin(), mainVector.end(), back_inserter(results), MyPredicate() );

If you want to do the same as the above except remove those items from mainVector, then you can use remove_copy_if:

mainVector.erase4( copy_if( mainVector.begin(), mainVector.end(), back_inserter(results), MyPredicate() ), mainVector.end() );

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