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I want to design a PostgreSQL database for my product which needs to handle ordered many to many relation. There is two solution for that:

  • (Normalized DB)create a middle table and put the order of relations in that
  • (Denormalized DB)use denormalized database and save all data in one table

My data model is like this:

Table 1(Exercise):

  • id

  • name

Table 2(Workout):

  • set of Exercises with order

every user can create custom workout(list of exercises with defined order). my problem is saving the order of relations in database, because default relation not preserve order.

  • @displayName thanks for reply. In general I know the cons and pros of both but I want to know best-practice for handling ordered relation. – kAvEh May 21 at 13:34
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    Normalization is the best practice. However, after 3NF, in general, it starts hurting the performance more than it adds value. – displayName May 21 at 13:37
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    I don't understand the question. What do you mean by "ordered" or "Exercises with order"? Normalisation of a schema gives you tables with key(s). It's a common misconception to think keys are ordered. If you want to say some row is 'greater than' some other row, you need column(s) whose values represent that. But the table is not thereby ordered. You might write a query with ORDER BY that presents rows in some physical sequence. That doesn't make the table ordered. – AntC May 21 at 23:53
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    My current generic comment re "better"/"best" etc: There's no such thing as "better"/"best" in engineering unless you define it. Also unfortunately all reasonable practical definitions require a ridiculous amount of experience with a ridiculous number of factors that interact with chaotic sensitivity to details. Make straightforward designs. When you demonstrate via measurement that a design and all alternatives you can think of have problems (whatever that means at the time), then ask a very specific question. Which should also define "better"/"best". meta.stackexchange.com/q/204461 – philipxy May 22 at 6:41
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As has been said in the comments, "best practice" supposes that there is exactly one best way to do things, and that is not the case. In pretty much all software design solutions, you have to trade things, in messy, unpredictable ways, which are nearly always context-dependent.

If I understand your question, your problem domain has the concept of a "user" who creates zero or more work-outs, and each work-out has one or more exercises, and the sequence in which that exercise occurs is an important attribute of the relationship between workout and exercise.

The normal way to store attributes of a many-to-many relationship is as additional columns on the joining table.

The normalized way of storing this would be something like:

user
-----
user_id
name
...

Workout
-----
workout_id
name
....

Exercise
------
exercise_id
name
....

workout_exercise
----------
workout_id
exercise_id
sequence -- this is how you capture the sequence of exercises within a workout
... -- there may be other attributes, e.g. number of repetitions, minimum duration, recommended rest period

user_workout
--------
user_id
workout_id
.... -- there may be other attributes, e.g. "active", "start date", "rating"

In terms of trade-offs, I'd expect this to scale to hundreds of millions of rows on commodity hardware without significant challenges. The queries can get moderately complex - you'll be joining 4 tables - but that's what databases are designed for. The data model describes (what I understand to be) the problem domain using separate entities etc.

  • after hours of searching, I am more tend to use normalized db. thanks for help – kAvEh May 22 at 12:26

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