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While testing some code I came across a situation that I can not explain. After hours of googling I couldn't really figure out the right questions to ask. Any help in the right direction or the correct terminology would be appreciated..!

So,.. When I require a file that is located in the same working directory, I am able to do the fallowing:

const { ports, keys } = require('./activeConfig');
console.log(ports, keys, activeConfig);

In this situation ports, keys, and activeConfig are all defined and i can use the module as if I had done:

const { ports, keys } = require('./activeConfig');
const activeConfig = require('./activeConfig');
console.log(ports, keys, activeConfig);

However if I try to do the exact same thing from an external directory like so:

const { ports, keys } = require('../../config/activeConfig');

or

const { ports, keys } = require('./config/activeConfig');

activeConfig is no longer defined and I get an error.

Why is this behavior different depending on the location that I am importing from? Or does this have to do with the way I am exporting the module?
I would like to keep my code nice and tidy, so I would prefer to avoid having to write the second require. Is there perhaps a different method to do this all in one line?

The module I am trying to require is a Singleton with the fallowing code:

const database = {...}
const keys = {...}
const ports = {...}
const tokens = {...}

module.exports = activeConfig = (() => {
    let _database = database;
    let _keys = keys;
    let _ports = ports;
    let _tokens = tokens;

    return {
        setDatabase: (value) => {
            if (value) {...}
            return activeConfig;
        },
        setKeys: (value) => {
            if (value) {...}
            return activeConfig;
        },
        setPorts: (value) => {
            if (value) {...}
            return activeConfig;
        },
        setTokens: (value) => {
            if (value) {...}
            return activeConfig;
        },
        updateConfig: () => {
               ...
            return activeConfig;
        },
        get database() {
            return _database;
        },
        get keys() {
            return _keys;
        },
        get ports() {
            return _ports;
        },
        get tokens() {
            return _tokens;
        },
        set database(value) {...},
        set keys(value) {...},
        set ports(value) {...},
        set tokens(value) {...}
    };
})();
  • 1
    Looks like you're trying to mix ES6 module syntax and CommonJS (module.exports)... which may result in weirdness. I think you need to pick one and stick to it. – jakerella May 21 at 16:29
2

What is happening is that your activeConfig module is declaring an implicit global variable.

The line:

module.exports = activeConfig = (() => { //...

This will leak the variable activeConfig to the global scope when you first require the module.

Afterwards, when you require the module again in other places, NodeJS will simply pull the previously exported object form the cache, and it won't execute the assignment.

Try running your code in strict mode, add "use strict" at the top of activeConfig.js and you will see that it won't let you leak the global variable.

Leaking globals is bad, I would instead recommend you to put a reference to the same instance in the object you export, so it can be "destructured" when you require it.

For example:

"use strict"
module.exports = (() => {
    // ....
    return {
       // ....
        get instance() {
            return this;
        },
    };
})();

And then when you require it:

const { ports, keys, instance: activeConfig } = require('./config/activeConfig');

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