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I'm trying to understand the difference between Symbol() and Symbol.for() in regard to cross realm.

I have read this article:http://2ality.com/2014/12/es6-symbols.html where it is said that:

Symbols have individual identities and thus don’t travel across realms as smoothly as other primitive values. That is a problem for symbols such as Symbol.iterator that should work across realms: If an object is iterable in one realm, it should be iterable in others, too. If a cross-realm symbol is provided by the JavaScript engine, the engine can make sure that the same value is used in each realm. For libraries, however, we need extra support, which comes in the form of the global symbol registry: This registry is global to all realms and maps strings to symbols. For each symbol, libraries need to come up with a string that is as unique as possible. To create the symbol, they don’t use Symbol(), they ask the registry for the symbol that the string is mapped to. If the registry already has an entry for the string, the associated symbol is returned. Otherwise, entry and symbol are created first.

Frankly, I don't know what does it mean that a symbol is accessable in one realm and not accessable in other. I have tried this piece of code:

  <iframe srcdoc="<script>var sym = Symbol(); var obj = {}; obj[sym] = 123;</script>">
  </iframe>
  <script>
    const iframe = document.querySelector('iframe');
    const content = iframe.contentWindow;
    const value = content.obj[content.sym]
  </script>

When consol logging value, in a realm other than iframe, I'm getting 123. Shouldn't sym not live in my script? Doesn't above code prove that Symbols indeed travel across realms?

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The distinction here is that when you do

const value = content.obj[content.sym]

you are accessing the cross-realm object content.obj with the cross-realm symbol content.sym. The parent frame may access both cross-realm items. The problem is that the "same" Symbol cannot be used to access a property in a different realm.

If Symbol S from a child realm is used to access an object from the child realm, and that object has S on it, there's no problem, as your example demonstrates. The problem is when Symbol S from the child realm is used to access an object from the **parent realm*, and that parent realm object also has a foo Symbol property on it, the cross-realm property lookup may fail:

<iframe srcdoc="<script>var sym = Symbol('foo');</script>">
  </iframe>
<script>
  const obj = {};
  const sym = Symbol('foo');
  obj[sym] = 'value';

  const iframe = document.querySelector('iframe');
  const content = iframe.contentWindow;
  const value = obj[content.sym];
  console.log(value); // undefined
</script>

https://jsfiddle.net/k4xh97ge/

Result: value is undefined, because the symbol for foo on one realm is not the same as the symbol for foo on another realm. The property lookup would only work if

(1) the symbol was from the global symbol registry, as the article describes, or

(2) the parent realm object used the symbol from the child realm (which is a very, very strange thing to see), for example:

<iframe srcdoc="<script>var sym = Symbol('foo');</script>">
  </iframe>
<script>
  const obj = {};
  const crossRealmSymbol = document.querySelector('iframe').contentWindow.sym;
  obj[crossRealmSymbol] = 'value';
  console.log(obj[crossRealmSymbol]);
</script>

https://jsfiddle.net/k4xh97ge/1/

Result: value is 'value'

  • Oh! I get it now! Thanks a lot! Can you also explain me what whould happen if symbol: Symbol.iterator would not be a cross-realm symbol? – leszczu450 May 21 at 22:21
  • + why do you say "(...) property lookup MAY fail" ? Is it somehow browser dependent? – leszczu450 May 21 at 22:34
  • If Symbol.iterator wasn't cross-realm, it couldn't be iterated over in a different realm, because the Symbols would be different. The iterator protocol looks up the Symbol.iterator property on the object - if this Symbol.iterator was different for each realm, iterating would become much more cumbersome. – CertainPerformance May 21 at 23:04
  • 1
    When you attempt to iterate an object, the interpreter looks up the Symbol.iterator property on the object. If you take an object from a child realm (or any other realm) and try to iterate it, and the Symbol.iterator in that child realm is the same (===) to the Symbol.iterator in the parent realm, there's no issue. But if each realm's Symbol.iterator is different, when trying to iterate over a cross origin object, the obj[Symbol.iterator] when in the context of the other realm would not exist - you'd need something like obj[crossRealmSymbolIterator] instead – CertainPerformance May 21 at 23:58
  • 1
    When in realm A, when iterating, it will always try to look up the Symbol.iterator property in realm A, even if the object being iterated over is in realm B. Luckily, Symbol.iterator is === across realms, so this doesn't cause a problem. – CertainPerformance May 22 at 22:25

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