-4

I have used 4 nested loop. I want to convert these loops to recursive. Is there a way to convert these loop into recursive?

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
for(int i=0;i<2;i++)
{
       for(int k=0;k<2;k++)
       {
               for(int t=0;t<2;t++)
               {
                       for(int p=0;p<2;p++)
                       {
                                cout<<i<<k<<t<<p<<endl;
                       }
                }
        }
}
}
  • 4
    Probably. Did you give it a go? – Lightness Races in Orbit May 21 at 23:01
  • 2
    As is the answer to your question is: Yes (however that's too short for an actual answer) – Borgleader May 21 at 23:07
  • It could be done, but does not look a very good candidate for recursion. Why do you want to? – shadowspawn May 22 at 2:13
1

I'm aware that your question is about converting your pyramid (nested) loops into a recursive function (bad idea due to potential stack overflow), but the code you have presented shows a truth table.

Is that what you are after?

If so, there's a much simpler way to accomplish the same result using bitwise >> shifts and the bitwise & operator.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    for ( int i = 0 ; i < 16 ; i++ )
    {
        bool a = ( i >> 3 ) & true;
        bool b = ( i >> 2 ) & true;
        bool c = ( i >> 1 ) & true;
        bool d = ( i >> 0 ) & true;

        std::cout << a << b << c <<  d << std::endl;
    }
}

Result:

0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111

Online code example: https://rextester.com/YAKJL54176

And there's an even simpler way (@Jarod42) if you use the std::bitset library.

#include <iostream>
#include <bitset>

int main()
{
    for (int i = 0; i != 16; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << std::bitset<4>(i) << "\n";
    }
}

The results are the same as above.

Online code example: https://rextester.com/VBKO8875

  • 2
    There is even std::bitset(as we don't have std::bin manipulator) Demo. – Jarod42 May 21 at 23:31
  • @Jarod42: So much simpler! I wasn't aware of this. Thanks! I'll add it into the answer. – Constantinos Glynos May 21 at 23:35
1

You might do something like:

void foo_rec(int i, int k, int t, int p)
{
    std::cout << i << k << t << p << std::endl;
    if (++p == 2) {
        p = 0;
        if (++t == 2) {
            t = 0;
            if (++k == 2) {
                k = 0;
                ++i;
            }
        }
    }
    if (i < 2) {
        foo_rec(i, k, t, p);
    }
}

void foo()
{
    foo_rec(0, 0, 0, 0);
}

Demo

  • I cannot find the words to sufficiently strongly express how much you should not use code like this. Oh wait I just did – Lightness Races in Orbit May 21 at 23:21
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit: About code to not use, I could still use goto to avoid recursive call ;-) – Jarod42 May 21 at 23:37
  • I wouldn't say this is good programming practice, but it's currently the best answer to the question. And we don't know the intent of the OP. It might be a hypothetical question, or a simplified example of a different use case... – wovano May 21 at 23:38
  • @Jarod42, goto?? Haha, I could even implement this with setjmp() It even looks quite nice actually (but just for fun of course) ;-) – wovano May 21 at 23:57
  • @Jarod42 Hah, true! Let's see it ;) – Lightness Races in Orbit May 22 at 9:30
0

You can but it is a very contrived example that shouldn't actually be recursive. You need to think about how to do it - one recursive function for the whole lot or a couple of smaller ones?

If you go with one recursive function for the whole lot then be aware of your stack size. Here it is 2^4 or 16 levels deep. That's probably ok, but what if k needs to be 0..100 instead of 0..1 ?

P.S. to backup my point: Code in the original question is much clearer than the code provided in the other 2 answers. I have no doubt they work, but if you don't have to think about them for a few seconds to figure out what they are doing then you're doing better than me ;-)

  • "I have no doubt they work". You should, both first tries had typo – Jarod42 May 21 at 23:19
  • @Jarod42 I was trying to be nice ;-) But yeah, both failed horribly which goes to show recursion is hard... Have you looked up recursion in the dictionary? Recursion (n): See recursion. – John3136 May 21 at 23:25
0

Is there a way to convert these loop into recursive?

I do not know of an automated mechanism ... but since your nested-for-loops post is reasonably simple, the manual conversion is straight forward.

Perhaps you are looking for a 'pattern' guide? So how does a simple recursive loop look?

You have tagged this post as C++, so here my offering uses functors, which are a simplified class's. These functor's use compiler provided ctor and dtor defaults, which do nothing (quickly).

Below, in the functor "Functor_TailRecursion_t", each for-loop of the post has been replaced with a recursive function, the name of which reflects the for loop var from the post original. Thus "void r_k(){...}" performs the "for(int k=0;k<2;k++){...} loop.

  • Note that each of the 'Functor' functions pass no parameters ... except the hidden 'this' parameter. This reduces automatic memory use during deep recursions (of which this example has none.)

  • Note that the recursive 'Functor' functions are all tail recursion. The compiler can optimize tail-recursion to iterative performance, though I have not tested on this code.

  • Remember that although the compiler is able to in-line small-class-functions, the recursive calls will prevent that from happening.

Good luck on your effort.

 #include <iostream>
 using std::cout, std::endl, std::flush;

 #ifndef                 DTB_PCKLRT_HH
 #include "../../bag/src/dtb_pclkrt.hh"
 using DTB::PClk_t;
 #endif


 // postfunction (extracted from main)
 void function_NestedForLoops()
 {
    for(int i=0;i<2;i++)
    {
       for(int k=0;k<2;k++)
       {
          for(int t=0;t<2;t++)
          {
             for(int p=0;p<2;p++)
             {
                cout<<i<<k<<t<<p<<endl;
             }
          }
       }
    }
 } // void function_NestedForLoops()


 // functor, tail recursion
 class Functor_TailRecursion_t
 {
    int i {0}, k {0}, t {0}, p {0};  // value-initialization
 public:
    void operator()() { r_i(); }     // enter recursion

 private:
    void r_i() { if (!(i < 2)) { i = 0; return; } r_k();  ++i;  r_i(); }

    void r_k() { if (!(k < 2)) { k = 0; return; } r_t();  ++k;  r_k(); }

    void r_t() { if (!(t < 2)) { t = 0; return; } r_p();  ++t;  r_t(); }

    void r_p() { if (!(p < 2)) { p = 0; return; } show(); ++p;  r_p(); }

    void show() { cout << "\n  " << i << k << t << p << flush; };
 }; // class Functor_TailRecursion_t



 class F808_t // ctor and dtor: compiler provided (do-nothing) defaults
 {
    PClk_t  pclk; // posix clock access
 public:
    int  operator()()
       {
          int retVal = 0;
          uint64_t start_ns = pclk.ns();

          cout << "\n\nfunction, nested for loops:\n";
          function_NestedForLoops();

          cout << "\n  functor, tail recursion: ";
          Functor_TailRecursion_t()();

          auto  duration_ns = pclk.ns() - start_ns;
          cout << "\n\n  F808_t::operator()() duration   " << duration_ns
               << " ns    (" <<  __cplusplus  << ")" << std::endl;
          return retVal;
       }

 }; // class F808_t


 int main(int, char**) { return F808_t()(); }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.