411

React hooks introduces useState for setting component state. But how can I use hooks to replace the callback like below code:

setState(
  { name: "Michael" },
  () => console.log(this.state)
);

I want to do something after the state is updated.

I know I can use useEffect to do the extra things but I have to check the state previous value which requires a bit code. I am looking for a simple solution which can be used with useState hook.

2
  • 2
    in class component, I used async and await to achieve the same result like what you did to add a callback in setState. Unfortunately, it is not working in hook. Even if I added async and await , react will not wait for state to update. Maybe useEffect is the only way to do it.
    – MING WU
    May 22, 2019 at 0:58
  • There's an easy way to do this without useEffect stackoverflow.com/a/70405577/5823517
    – Tunn
    Dec 18, 2021 at 17:35

23 Answers 23

430

You need to use useEffect hook to achieve this.

const [counter, setCounter] = useState(0);

const doSomething = () => {
  setCounter(123);
}

useEffect(() => {
   console.log('Do something after counter has changed', counter);
}, [counter]);

If you want the useEffect callback to be ignored during the first initial render, then modify the code accordingly:

import React, { useEffect, useRef } from 'react';

const [counter, setCounter] = useState(0);
const didMount = useRef(false);

const doSomething = () => {
  setCounter(123);
}

useEffect(() => {
  // Return early, if this is the first render:
  if ( !didMount.current ) {
    return didMount.current = true;
  }
  // Paste code to be executed on subsequent renders:
  console.log('Do something after counter has changed', counter);
}, [counter]);
10
  • 113
    This will fire the console.log on the first render as well as any time counter changes. What if you only want to do something after the state has been updated but not on initial render as the initial value is set? I guess you could check the value in useEffect and decide if you want to do something then. Would that be considered best practice? Jun 6, 2019 at 9:20
  • 3
    To avoid running useEffect on initial render, you can create a custom useEffect hook, which doesn't run on initial render. To create such a hook, you can check out this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/53253940/…
    – user12200634
    Mar 26, 2020 at 16:24
  • 75
    And what about case, when i want to call different callbacks in different setState calls, which will change same state value? You answer is wrong, and in shouldn't be marked as correct to not confusing newbies. The true is that setState callbacks its one of the hardest problems while migrating on hooks from classes which hasn't one clear solving method. Sometimes you really wil be enougth some value-depending effect, and sometimes it'll requires some hacky methods, like saving some kind of flags in Refs. Jun 3, 2020 at 8:51
  • 8
    @KenIngram I just tried that and got this very specific error: Warning: State updates from the useState() and useReducer() Hooks don't support the second callback argument. To execute a side effect after rendering, declare it in the component body with useEffect(). Sep 30, 2020 at 4:10
  • 24
    useEffect cannot be used in all scenarios. sometimes the state gets updated from several places, but you wish to use a called only from one of those places. How can you differentiate easily? A callback is perfect in such situations. A hack would be to use another ugly useState only to be used so a specific change could be detected. very ugly...
    – vsync
    Dec 6, 2020 at 22:10
60

If you want to update previous state then you can do like this in hooks:

const [count, setCount] = useState(0);


setCount(previousCount => previousCount + 1);

Docs:

7
  • 1
    @BimalGrg Does this really work? I cannot replicate this. It fails to compile with this error: expected as assignment or function call and instead saw an expression Nov 30, 2020 at 19:30
  • @tonitone120 there is an arrow function inside setCount.
    – Bimal Grg
    Dec 3, 2020 at 3:09
  • 55
    @BimalGrg The question is asking for the ability to execute code immediately after state is updated. Does this code really help with that task? Dec 3, 2020 at 13:20
  • 1
    @tonitone120 if you want execute code immediately after state is updated then you have to use useEffect hook. In useEffect you can check whether state updated or not and perform any action accordingly.
    – Bimal Grg
    Dec 16, 2020 at 3:12
  • 1
    @DrazenBjelovuk it's documented in the official Hook API doc under the Functional Update section of useState. Apr 15, 2022 at 16:26
54

Mimic setState callback with useEffect, only firing on state updates (not initial state):

const [state, setState] = useState({ name: "Michael" })
const isFirstRender = useRef(true)
useEffect(() => {
  if (isFirstRender.current) {
    isFirstRender.current = false // toggle flag after first render/mounting
    return;
  }
  console.log(state) // do something after state has updated
}, [state])

Custom Hook useEffectUpdate

function useEffectUpdate(callback) {
  const isFirstRender = useRef(true);
  useEffect(() => {
    if (isFirstRender.current) {
      isFirstRender.current = false; // toggle flag after first render/mounting
      return;
    }
    callback(); // performing action after state has updated
  }, [callback]);
}

// client usage, given some state dep
const cb = useCallback(() => { console.log(state) }, [state]); // memoize callback
useEffectUpdate(cb);
1
  • 2
    Alternative: useState can be implemented to receive a callback like setState in classes.
    – ford04
    Sep 11, 2020 at 7:55
47

I Think, using useEffect is not an intuitive way.

I created a wrapper for this. In this custom hook, you can transmit your callback to setState parameter instead of useState parameter.

I just created Typescript version. So if you need to use this in Javascript, just remove some type notation from code.

Usage

const [state, setState] = useStateCallback(1);
setState(2, (n) => {
  console.log(n) // 2
});

Declaration

import { SetStateAction, useCallback, useEffect, useRef, useState } from 'react';

type Callback<T> = (value?: T) => void;
type DispatchWithCallback<T> = (value: T, callback?: Callback<T>) => void;

function useStateCallback<T>(initialState: T | (() => T)): [T, DispatchWithCallback<SetStateAction<T>>] {
  const [state, _setState] = useState(initialState);

  const callbackRef = useRef<Callback<T>>();
  const isFirstCallbackCall = useRef<boolean>(true);

  const setState = useCallback((setStateAction: SetStateAction<T>, callback?: Callback<T>): void => {
    callbackRef.current = callback;
    _setState(setStateAction);
  }, []);

  useEffect(() => {
    if (isFirstCallbackCall.current) {
      isFirstCallbackCall.current = false;
      return;
    }
    callbackRef.current?.(state);
  }, [state]);

  return [state, setState];
}

export default useStateCallback;

Drawback

If the passed arrow function references a variable outer function, then it will capture current value not a value after the state is updated. In the above usage example, console.log(state) will print 1 not 2.

7
  • 5
    Thanks! cool approach. Created a sample codesandbox
    – ValYouW
    Aug 30, 2020 at 13:05
  • @ValYouW Thank your for creating sample. The only matter is that if passed arrow function references variable outer function, then it will capture current values not values after state is updated.
    – MJ Studio
    Aug 30, 2020 at 16:10
  • How to get the previous state value here? Sep 27, 2020 at 12:15
  • 1
    @Ankan-Zerob I think, in the Usage part, the state is referring the previous one yet when callback is called. Isn't it?
    – MJ Studio
    Sep 29, 2020 at 12:54
  • @MJStudio Hi MJ, thank you for your answer, it is mostly correct, but I'm unable to refer to a specific key in your example. Just try setState({name: 'Bob'}, (n) => {console.log(n.name)}). To be more specific I'll get an error here n.name, how it could be fixed?
    – Andrew
    Dec 23, 2020 at 12:55
20

I was running into the same problem, using useEffect in my setup didn't do the trick (I'm updating a parent's state from an array multiple child components and I need to know which component updated the data).

Wrapping setState in a promise allows to trigger an arbitrary action after completion:

import React, {useState} from 'react'

function App() {
  const [count, setCount] = useState(0)

  function handleClick(){
    Promise.resolve()
      .then(() => { setCount(count => count+1)})
      .then(() => console.log(count))
  }


  return (
    <button onClick= {handleClick}> Increase counter </button>
  )
}

export default App;

The following question put me in the right direction: Does React batch state update functions when using hooks?

2
  • 19
    setCount is asynchronous, right? If so, there would be a race condition, and console.log might print an old value.
    – RavenMan
    Apr 7, 2021 at 19:11
  • 3
    This isn't working anymore in 2022 Apr 12, 2022 at 1:14
15

I wrote custom hook with typescript if anyone still needs it.

import React, { useEffect, useRef, useState } from "react";

export const useStateWithCallback = <T>(initialState: T): [state: T, setState: (updatedState: React.SetStateAction<T>, callback?: (updatedState: T) => void) => void] => {
    const [state, setState] = useState<T>(initialState);
    const callbackRef = useRef<(updated: T) => void>();

    const handleSetState = (updatedState: React.SetStateAction<T>, callback?: (updatedState: T) => void) => {
        callbackRef.current = callback;
        setState(updatedState);
    };

    useEffect(() => {
        if (typeof callbackRef.current === "function") {
            callbackRef.current(state);
            callbackRef.current = undefined;
        }
    }, [state]);

    return [state, handleSetState];
}
0
11

setState() enqueues changes to the component state and tells React that this component and its children need to be re-rendered with the updated state.

setState method is asynchronous, and as a matter of fact, it does not return a promise. So In cases where we want to update or call a function, the function can be called callback in setState function as the second argument. For example, in your case above, you have called a function as a setState callback.

setState(
  { name: "Michael" },
  () => console.log(this.state)
);

The above code works fine for class component, but in the case of functional component, we cannot use the setState method, and this we can utilize the use effect hook to achieve the same result.

The obvious method, that comes into mind is that ypu can use with useEffect is as below:

const [state, setState] = useState({ name: "Michael" })

useEffect(() => {
  console.log(state) // do something after state has updated
}, [state])

But this would fire on the first render as well, so we can change the code as follows where we can check the first render event and avoid the state render. Therefore the implementation can be done in the following way:

We can use the user hook here to identify the first render.

The useRef Hook allows us to create mutable variables in functional components. It’s useful for accessing DOM nodes/React elements and to store mutable variables without triggering a re-render.

const [state, setState] = useState({ name: "Michael" });
const firstTimeRender = useRef(true);

useEffect(() => {
 if (!firstTimeRender.current) {
    console.log(state);
  }
}, [state])

useEffect(() => { 
  firstTimeRender.current = false 
}, [])
1
  • 1
    this help me a lot, thanks. I would like to add something because it was giving me failures at first, the order of the useEffect functions is very important. note that you have to write first the useEffect with dependencies and later the "componentDidMount" with no dependecies. that is, as it is in the example. Thanks again. Jan 27, 2021 at 4:54
10

you can use following ways I knew to get the lastest state after updating:

  1. useEffect
    https://reactjs.org/docs/hooks-reference.html#useeffect
    const [state, setState] = useState({name: "Michael"});
    
    const handleChangeName = () => {
      setState({name: "Jack"});
    }
    
    useEffect(() => {
      console.log(state.name); //"Jack"

      //do something here
    }, [state]);
  1. functional update
    https://reactjs.org/docs/hooks-reference.html#functional-updates
    "If the new state is computed using the previous state, you can pass a function to setState. The function will receive the previous value, and return an updated value. "
    const [state, setState] = useState({name: "Michael"});

    const handleChangeName = () => {
      setState({name: "Jack"})
      setState(prevState => {
        console.log(prevState.name);//"Jack"

        //do something here

        // return updated state
        return prevState;
      });
    }
  1. useRef
    https://reactjs.org/docs/hooks-reference.html#useref
    "The returned ref object will persist for the full lifetime of the component."
    const [state, setState] = useState({name: "Michael"});

    const stateRef = useRef(state);
    stateRef.current  = state;
    const handleClick = () => {
      setState({name: "Jack"});

      setTimeout(() => {
        //it refers to old state object
        console.log(state.name);// "Michael";

        //out of syntheticEvent and after batch update
        console.log(stateRef.current.name);//"Jack"

        //do something here
      }, 0);
    }

In react syntheticEvent handler, setState is a batch update process, so every change of state will be waited and return a new state.
"setState() does not always immediately update the component. It may batch or defer the update until later. ",
https://reactjs.org/docs/react-component.html#setstate

Here is a useful link
Does React keep the order for state updates?

2

I had a use case where I wanted to make an api call with some params after the state is set. I didn't want to set those params as my state so I made a custom hook and here is my solution

import { useState, useCallback, useRef, useEffect } from 'react';
import _isFunction from 'lodash/isFunction';
import _noop from 'lodash/noop';

export const useStateWithCallback = initialState => {
  const [state, setState] = useState(initialState);
  const callbackRef = useRef(_noop);

  const handleStateChange = useCallback((updatedState, callback) => {
    setState(updatedState);
    if (_isFunction(callback)) callbackRef.current = callback;
  }, []);

  useEffect(() => {
    callbackRef.current();
    callbackRef.current = _noop; // to clear the callback after it is executed
  }, [state]);

  return [state, handleStateChange];
};
1
  • doesnt it throws error when not callback is provided? Mar 7, 2021 at 15:11
1

Your question is very valid.Let me tell you that useEffect run once by default and after every time the dependency array changes.

check the example below::

import React,{ useEffect, useState } from "react";

const App = () => {
  const [age, setAge] = useState(0);
  const [ageFlag, setAgeFlag] = useState(false);

  const updateAge = ()=>{
    setAgeFlag(false);
    setAge(age+1);
    setAgeFlag(true);
  };

  useEffect(() => {
    if(!ageFlag){
      console.log('effect called without change - by default');
    }
    else{
      console.log('effect called with change ');
    }
  }, [ageFlag,age]);

  return (
    <form>
      <h2>hooks demo effect.....</h2>
      {age}
      <button onClick={updateAge}>Text</button>
    </form>
  );
}

export default App;

If you want the setState callback to be executed with the hooks then use flag variable and give IF ELSE OR IF block inside useEffect so that when that conditions are satisfied then only that code block execute. Howsoever times effect runs as dependency array changes but that IF code inside effect will execute only on that specific conditions.

4
  • 4
    This won't work. You don't know in which order the three statements inside updateAge will actually work. All three are async. The Only thing guaranteed is that first line runs before 3rd (since they work on same state). You don't know anything about 2nd line. This example is too simle to see this. Mar 30, 2020 at 7:51
  • My friend mohit. I have implemented this technique in a big complex react project when i was moving from react classes to hooks and it works perfectly. Simply try the same logic anywhere in hooks for replacing setState callback and you will know.
    – arjun sah
    Apr 19, 2020 at 20:25
  • 4
    "works in my project isn't an explanation" , read the docs. They are not synchronous at all. You can't say for sure that the three lines in updateAge would work in that order. If it was in sync then whats need of flag, directly call console.log() line after setAge. Apr 20, 2020 at 4:56
  • 1
    useRef is a much better solution for "ageFlag".
    – Dr.Flink
    May 26, 2020 at 6:58
1

We can write a hook called useScheduleNextRenderCallback that returns a "schedule" function. After we call setState, we can call the "schedule" function, passing a callback that we want to run on the next render.

import { useCallback, useEffect, useRef } from "react";

type ScheduledCallback = () => void;
export const useScheduleNextRenderCallback = () => {
  const ref = useRef<ScheduledCallback>();

  useEffect(() => {
    if (ref.current !== undefined) {
      ref.current();
      ref.current = undefined;
    }
  });

  const schedule = useCallback((fn: ScheduledCallback) => {
    ref.current = fn;
  }, []);

  return schedule;
};

Example usage:

const App = () => {
  const scheduleNextRenderCallback = useScheduleNextRenderCallback();

  const [state, setState] = useState(0);

  const onClick = useCallback(() => {
    setState(state => state + 1);
    scheduleNextRenderCallback(() => {
      console.log("next render");
    });
  }, []);

  return <button onClick={onClick}>click me to update state</button>;
};

Reduced test case: https://stackblitz.com/edit/react-ts-rjd9jk

1

Simple solution, Just install

npm i use-state-with-callback

import React from 'react';
import { useStateWithCallbackLazy } from "use-state-with-callback";

const initialFilters = {
  smart_filter: "",
};

const MyCallBackComp = () => {
  const [filters, setFilters] = useStateWithCallbackLazy(initialFilters);

  const filterSearchHandle = (e) => {
    setFilters(
      {
        ...filters,
        smart_filter: e,
      },
      (value) => console.log("smartFilters:>", value)
    );
  };

  return (
    <Input
      type="text"
      onChange={(e) => filterSearchHandle(e.target.value)}
      name="filter"
      placeholder="Search any thing..."
    />
  );
};

credited to: REACT USESTATE CALLBACK

1

Edited

Using promise here seems still postpone the execution after rerender, triggering setState twice may be the best solution to get the latest state. Because the setState will be listed and we just need to get prevState to use before rerendering.

Original Post

I just figured out if we can use a Promise here to let setState become awaitable.

Here is my experiment result, feels better then using a callback

Mainly temp the resolve function to trigger in useEffect

function useAsyncState(initialState) {
  const [state, setState] = useState(initialState)
  const resolveCb = useRef()

  const handleSetState = (updatedState) => new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    // force previous promise resolved
    if (typeof resolveCb.current === 'function') {
      resolveCb.current(updatedState)
    }
    resolveCb.current = resolve
    try {
      setState(updatedState)
    } catch(err) {
      resolveCb.current = undefined
      reject(err)
    }
  })

  useEffect(() => {
    if (typeof resolveCb.current === 'function') {
      resolveCb.current(state)
      resolveCb.current = undefined
    }
  }, [state])

  return [state, handleSetState]
}

using in component

function App() {
  const [count, setCount] = useAsyncState(0)

  const increment = useMemoizedFn(async () => {
    const newCount = await setCount(count + 1)
    console.log(newCount)
  })

  console.log('rerender')

  return (
    <div>
      <h3 onClick={increment}>Hi, {count}</h3>
    </div>
  )
}
1

I have a very specific use case where I needed to render a class in the dom, then set another class. This was my solution which I found to be quite elegant.

const [value1, setValue1] = useState({value: 'whatever', onValue: false})


useEffect(() => {
    setValue1(prev => ({
      value: 'whatever',
      onValue: !prev.onValue, 
    }));
}, ['whatever'])

 
useEffect(() => {

// if you want to ensure the render happens before doThing2() then put it in a timeout of 1ms,
  setTimeout(doThing2, 1); 

// or if you are happy to call it immediately after setting value don't include the timeout
 doThing2()


}, [value1.onValue])
0

I don't think that distinguish mounted or not with useRef is a good way, isn't a better way by determining the value genetated useState() in useEffect() whether it is the initial value?

const [val, setVal] = useState(null)

useEffect(() => {
  if (val === null) return
  console.log('not mounted, val updated', val)
}, [val])
0

Until we have native built in support for setState callback, we can do the plain javascript way ... call the function and pass the new variables to it directly.

  const [counter, setCounter] = useState(0);

  const doSomething = () => {
    const newCounter = 123
    setCounter(newCounter);
    doSomethingWCounter(newCounter);
  };

  function doSomethingWCounter(newCounter) {
    console.log(newCounter); // 123
  }
1
  • 5
    It's not guaranteed that doSomethingWCounter is called when setState is finished. Jan 27, 2022 at 16:25
0

If you don't need to update state asynchronously you can use a ref to save the value instead of useState.

const name = useRef("John");
name.current = "Michael";
console.log(name.current); // will print "Michael" since updating the ref is not async
0

I explored the use-state-with-callback npm library, and other similar custom hooks, but in the end I realized I can just do something like this:

const [user, setUser] = React.useState(
  {firstName: 'joe', lastName: 'schmo'}
)

const handleFirstNameChange=(val)=> {
  const updatedUser = {
     ...user,
     firstName: val
  }
  setUser(updatedUser)
  updateDatabase(updatedUser)
}
1
  • 2
    In this case that surely works, but if you want to trigger something right after changing the state, but only after actually asynchronously changed then you need useEffect or one of the custom hooks which use useEffect under the hood. Wanted mention this, as it might be confusing to others
    – Can Rau
    Apr 18, 2022 at 16:57
0

Custom Hook for useState with Callback:

import { useCallback, useEffect, useRef, useState } from 'react';

// Define a generic function type for the updater and the callback
type Updater<T> = T | ((prevState: T) => T);
type Callback<T> = (state: T) => void;

function useStateCallback<T>(initialState: T): [T, (stateUpdater: Updater<T>, cb?: Callback<T>) => void] {
    const [state, setState] = useState<T>(initialState);
    const cbRef = useRef<Callback<T> | undefined>(undefined); // Ref to hold the callback

    const setStateCallback = useCallback(
        (stateUpdater: Updater<T>, cb?: Callback<T>) => {
            cbRef.current = cb; // Store the callback in ref
            // Set the state, handle function type updater for prevState
            setState(prevState => typeof stateUpdater === 'function' 
                ? (stateUpdater as (prevState: T) => T)(prevState) 
                : stateUpdater);
        }, 
        []
    );

    // useEffect to call the callback after state update
    useEffect(() => {
        if (cbRef.current) {
            cbRef.current(state); // Call the callback with the updated state
            cbRef.current = undefined; // Reset the callback ref
        }
    }, [state]);

    return [state, setStateCallback];
}

export default useStateCallback;

This hook adds a bit more complexity, but effectively mimics class component setState in hooks.

Potential Usage:

import React from 'react';
import useStateCallback from './useStateCallback';

const ExampleComponent: React.FC = () => {
    const [count, setCount] = useStateCallback(0);

    // Example usage of setState with a callback
    const incrementAndLog = () => {
        setCount(count + 1, (newCount) => {
            console.log(`Count updated to: ${newCount}`);
        });
    };

    return (
        <div>
            <p>Count: {count}</p>
            <button onClick={incrementAndLog}>Increment</button>
        </div>
    );
};

export default ExampleComponent;
-1

What about passing a function?

const [name, setName] = useState(initialName); 
...
setName(() => {
    const nextName = "Michael";
    console.log(nextName);
    return nextName;
  });
-2

I think what you need is useState and useCallback:

Example Code

import React, { useCallback, useState } from 'react';

const Test = () => {
  const [name, setName] = useState("");
  const testCallback = useCallback(() => console.log(name), [name]);

  return (
    <button onClick={() => {
      setName("Michael")
      testCallback();
    }}>Name</button>
  )
};

export default Test;
0
-3

How about this:

const [Name, setName] = useState("");
...
onClick={()=>{
setName("Michael")
setName(prevName=>{...}) //prevName is Michael?
}}

2
  • prevName won't be "Michael" as useState is async just like setState in class components. You can't update the state on one line and assume it's already changed on the next one. You'll likely use the unchanged state. Jan 14, 2021 at 9:31
  • It's weird, prevName is Michael, but if u call another function in the callback that use the Name, it's still not updated.
    – james h
    Jan 14, 2021 at 9:45
-9

UseEffect is the primary solution. But as Darryl mentioned, using useEffect and passing in state as the second parameter has one flaw, the component will run on the initialization process. If you just want the callback function to run using the updated state's value, you could set a local constant and use that in both the setState and the callback.

const [counter, setCounter] = useState(0);

const doSomething = () => {
  const updatedNumber = 123;
  setCounter(updatedNumber);

  // now you can "do something" with updatedNumber and don't have to worry about the async nature of setState!
  console.log(updatedNumber);
}
2
  • 8
    setCounter is async you don't know if console.log will be called after setCounter or before. Mar 30, 2020 at 7:53
  • he want to split to another variable that can make you do the next step without wait the setState callback
    – famfamfam
    Jun 1, 2022 at 10:12

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