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I have an 11 week game schedule for 11 teams (5 games each week). I need to try to select from that list 11 games (1 each week) that provide each of the 11 teams with a broadcast of one home and one away game. Ideally this would be code that I would be able to reuse for future years and that I could scale to more teams and weeks if necessary.

I know that the likelihood of finding a viable solution for a given, already created schedule is extremely low, and, in many cases there doesn't exist a solution. So, when a solution of the type listed above doesn't exist, I would like to get a schedule that come close. That is, one in which all the teams get two broadcasts, but some teams may get two home or two away games instead of one of each.

I've looked a several different approaches. I have a number of 5x2 (Away Team, Home Team) arrays (weekly matchups) that I've tried to run a sort/selection with conditions (like a_1 =\= a_j j>1 and a_i in {1..11}) on, but I can't figure out how to get the double restriction selection to work, and I can't figure out how to make it go back to a previous selection when it has no more viable selections. I've tried to brute force it, but 40 million possible combinations is more than I can handle.

I'm using MATLab to perform all the work. I can usually translate from C or C++ to MATLab usable code.

  • Don't use enumeration! :) This is a perfect setup for an integer programming approach. – LarrySnyder610 May 21 at 23:44
  • This paper might be useful: pubsonline.informs.org/doi/10.1287/ited.5.1.10 – LarrySnyder610 May 21 at 23:45
  • Thanks for the suggestions Larry. I've considered the LP/IP route, but I can't find good constraints for the problem. The curse of not being very creative. I'll take another look and see if I can develop something. – user10499699 May 22 at 2:52
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This seemed like a fun problem so I took a crack at formulating it as an IP.

Let J and T be the set of teams and weeks.

Let G be the set of all games; each element of G is a tuple (i,j,t) that indicates the away team (i), the home team (j), and the week (t).

Let H be the set of all home games; each element of H is a tuple (j,t) that indicates the home team (j) and the week (t).

Define the following binary decision variables:

  • w[j,t] = 1 if we broadcast the home game at j in week t, = 0 otherwise (defined for (j,t) in H)
  • x[j] = 1 if team j has an away-game broadcast, = 0 otherwise (defined for j in J)
  • y[j] = 1 if team j has a home-game broadcast, = 0 otherwise (defined for j in J)
  • z[j] = 1 if team j has both an away-game and a home-game broadcast, = 0 otherwise (defined for j in J)

Then the model is:

maximize    sum {j in J} z[j]
subject to  sum {j in J} w[j,t] = 1                        for all t
            x[j] <= sum {(i,t) in H: (j,i,t) in G} w[i,t]  for all j
            y[j] <= sum {t in T} w[j,t]                    for all j
            z[j] <= (1/2) * (x[j] + y[j])                  for all j
            w[j,t], x[j], y[j], z[j] in {0,1}

The objective function calculates the total number of teams that get both a home and an away broadcast. The first constraint says we need exactly one broadcast per week. The second constraint says x[j] can't equal 1 unless there is some week when j's away game gets broadcast. The third constraint says the same for y[j] and the home broadcast. The fourth constraint says z[j] can't equal 1 unless both x[j] and y[j] equal 1. The last constraint says everything has to be binary.

I coded this model in Python/PuLP using an 11-game schedule. (Obviously you'd plug in your own schedule.)

from pulp import *
import numpy as np

# Number of teams, weeks, and games per week.
num_teams = 11
num_weeks = 11
num_games_per_week = 5

# Lists of teams and weeks.
teams = range(1, num_teams+1)
weeks = range(1, num_weeks+1)

# List of game tuples: (i, j, t) means team i plays at team j in week t.
games = [(1, 10, 1), (2, 9, 1), (3, 8, 1), (4, 7, 1), (5, 6, 1),
         (6, 4, 2), (7, 3, 2), (8, 2, 2), (9, 1, 2), (10, 11, 2),
         (2, 11, 3), (3, 10, 3), (4, 9, 3), (5, 8, 3), (6, 7, 3),
         (7, 5, 4), (8, 4, 4), (9, 3, 4), (10, 2, 4), (11, 1, 4),
         (3, 1, 5), (4, 11, 5), (5, 10, 5), (6, 9, 5), (7, 8, 5),
         (8, 6, 6), (9, 5, 6), (10, 4, 6), (11, 3, 6), (1, 2, 6),
         (4, 2, 7), (5, 1, 7), (6, 11, 7), (7, 10, 7), (8, 9, 7),
         (9, 7, 8), (10, 6, 8), (11, 5, 8), (1, 4, 8), (2, 3, 8),
         (5, 3, 9), (6, 2, 9), (7, 1, 9), (8, 11, 9), (9, 10, 9),
         (10, 8, 10), (11, 7, 10), (1, 6, 10), (2, 5, 10), (3, 4, 10),
         (11, 9, 11), (1, 8, 11), (2, 7, 11), (3, 6, 11), (4, 5, 11)]

# List of home games: (j, t) means there is a home game at j in week t.
home_games = [(j, t) for (i, j, t) in games]

# Initialize problem.
prob = LpProblem('Broadcast', LpMaximize)

# Generate decision variables.
w = LpVariable.dicts('w', home_games, 0, 1, LpInteger)
x = LpVariable.dicts('x', teams, 0, 1, LpInteger)
y = LpVariable.dicts('y', teams, 0, 1, LpInteger)
z = LpVariable.dicts('z', teams, 0, 1, LpInteger)

# Objective function.
prob += lpSum([z[j] for j in teams])

# Constraint: 1 broadcast per week.
for t in weeks:
    prob += lpSum([w[j, t] for j in teams if (j, t) in home_games]) == 1

# Constraint: x[j] can only = 1 if we broadcast a game in which j is away team.
for j in teams:
    prob += x[j] <= lpSum([w[i, t] for (i, t) in home_games if (j, i, t) in games])

# Constraint: y[j] can only = 1 if we broadcast a game in which j is home team.
for j in teams:
    prob += y[j] <= lpSum(([w[j, t] for t in weeks if (j, t) in home_games]))

# Constraint: z[j] can only = 1 if x[j] and y[j] both = 1.
for j in teams:
    prob += z[j] <= 0.5 * (x[j] + y[j])

# Solve problem.
prob.solve()

# Print status.
print("Status:", LpStatus[prob.status])

# Print optimal values of decision variables.
for v in prob.variables():
    if v.varValue is not None and v.varValue > 0:
        print(v.name, "=", v.varValue)

# Prettier print.
print("\nNumber of teams with both home and away broadcasts: {:.0f}".format(np.sum([z[j].value() for j in teams])))
for (i, j, t) in games:
    if w[j, t].value() == 1:
        print("Week {:2d}: broadcast team {:2d} at team {:2d}".format(t, i, j))

The results are:

Number of teams with both home and away broadcasts: 11
Week  1: broadcast team  1 at team 10
Week  2: broadcast team 10 at team 11
Week  3: broadcast team  5 at team  8
Week  4: broadcast team  8 at team  4
Week  5: broadcast team  6 at team  9
Week  6: broadcast team 11 at team  3
Week  7: broadcast team  4 at team  2
Week  8: broadcast team  9 at team  7
Week  9: broadcast team  7 at team  1
Week 10: broadcast team  2 at team  5
Week 11: broadcast team  3 at team  6

You can see that each team gets both a home and an away broadcast.

  • Awesome Larry. Following the examples that the paper you referenced above I had an Excel sheet with 605 variables, 5 constraints and 1210 dependencies that I was trying to get solver to reduce. It wasn't liking it. ;-) This is exactly the solution that I was looking for and needing. I have already adapted it to work for some of the larger scheduling problems that I have too. – user10499699 May 22 at 19:47
  • Great. Glad to help. Do you mind if I ask what sport and/or league this is for? – LarrySnyder610 May 22 at 19:56
  • This is for a small NAIA (collegiate but not NCAA) conference in the midwest. We are working with ESPN3 to broadcast games for both football and basketball. The conference has a different number of teams for football and basketball which is why i needed the code to be scaleable. – user10499699 May 22 at 21:35
  • Awesome. I’ll stay tuned. :) – LarrySnyder610 May 22 at 22:09

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