2

I have in input a list of tuples with a string and a list of integers. The integers goes from 1 to n and they appear at most one time:

l = [('red', [0,2,5]),
     ('yellow', [1,4]),
     ('red', [6])]

I want to create a list of n strings where if the index appear in one of the lists, it's value will be the corresponding string and if it doesn't appear a default value will be applied, for example white.

This is the expected output:

result = ['red', 'yellow', 'red', 'white', 'yellow', 'red', 'red']

This is my code, it works fine but I'm wondering if there is a faster way to do it:

result = ['white'] * n

for t in l:
    for i in t[1]:
        result[i] = t[0]

Edit:

I forgot to say that n is about 300.

  • It cannot be done faster that your O(n) code. – quamrana May 22 at 9:12
  • you have to touch every value in the dictionary and then every element in the list. So time complexity will remain the same. The code however can be short. – Vishal May 22 at 9:13
  • I know, but i'm wondering if there is some function to fo it that maybe is faster of nested for loops. – dome May 22 at 9:13
  • 1
    @Vishal (and quamrana) while time complexity does stay the same, in general python has multiple ways to do iteration-based things and often the execution time is greatly different (e.g., looping vs list comprehensions vs numpy-based approaches) – GPhilo May 22 at 9:15
4

For all "is there a faster way to do this" questions in python (and, I believe, in most languages as well), the answer is measure it, then you'll know.

I took the code in the answers proposed so far and timed it:

import numpy as np
import timeit

n = 7
l = [('red', [0,2,5]),
     ('yellow', [1,4]),
     ('red', [6])]

def OP_approach():
    result = ['white'] * n
    for t in l:
        for i in t[1]:
            result[i] = t[0]
    return result

def yatu_approach():
    d = {j:i[0] for i in l for j in i[1]}
    return [d.get(i, 'white') for i in range(len(d)+1)]

def blue_note_approach():
    x = np.empty(7, dtype='<U5')
    x.fill('white')
    for a, b in l:
        x[b] = a
    return x

timeit.timeit(OP_approach, number=10000)
timeit.timeit(yatu_approach, number=10000)
timeit.timeit(blue_note_approach, number=10000)

To my surprise, this is the result on my machine (arm64 board):

>>> timeit.timeit(OP_approach, number=10000)
0.033418309001717716
>>> timeit.timeit(yatu_approach, number=10000)
0.10994336503790691
>>> timeit.timeit(blue_note_approach, number=10000)
0.3608954470255412

It seems, then, that for the sample data given the simple double-loop is faster than both other options. Do keep in mind however that, as pointed out by @yatu, these algorithms scale very differently and the choice of which to use depends on the expected size of the problem to solve.

  • 1
    Thank you, I will do tests on my machine too because in my code I have greater instances of this problem, maybe something can change. – dome May 22 at 11:36
  • Try with 100.000. OPs solution does not scale well – yatu May 22 at 12:23
  • @yatu the point of the answer is not to provide the "fastest" solution, but rather to suggest trying the alternatives and see what works best in the specific setup the OP has. Of course, at different scales different problems emerge, but scaling to huge dimensions was never mentioned in the question, nor presented as a requirement. – GPhilo May 22 at 12:28
  • 1
    OP posted a sample, which I used to evaluate three algorithms. If the OP cares for the case where N is 100k, it's trivial enough to generate a suitable list and rerun the script. My point is still the same, though: measuring is the way to go when comparing algorithms for performance. – GPhilo May 22 at 12:35
  • 2
    In my program n is just about 300. I made some tesst and unfotunately my solution with for loops it's the fastest. – dome May 22 at 15:03
2

Only by using numpy

import numpy as np
x = np.empty(7, dtype='<U6')
x.fill('white')

for a, b in l:
    x[b] = a

where U6 means a unicode string of length 6 (at most)

  • 1
    <U6 because yellow </nitpick> – bereal May 22 at 9:21
  • @bereal: thanks – blue_note May 22 at 9:35
1
from operator import itemgetter

l = [('red', [0,2,5]),
     ('yellow', [1,4]),
     ('red', [6])]
# get len of result
n = max(l, key = itemgetter(1))[1] 

# initialize the result list
result = ['white'] * 7

for t in l:
    for i in t[1]:
        result[i] = t[0]

Output :

result = ['red', 'yellow', 'red', 'white', 'yellow', 'red', 'red']

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