9

I have a constant stream of numbers that I am generating that I will later need to iterate over.

Is it more efficient to add them to an array then use std::sort() or to add them to a heap(priority queue) and then later pop them off?

Currently, I just have a vector that I am pushing back. Would another data structure better suited for sorting-as-i-go-along? So the question is would be inserting into a heap n times at log(n) per insert (nlogn) be faster than just sorting after the fact (also nlogn)?

  • 1
    You end goal is a sorted array in both cases, so you know there is a hard nlog n limit, and it does not matter what you use. Beyond this the answer may be n dependent, implementation dependent, and consider non-worst cases. You should at least ask yourself and put in the question what is the expected largest n. – kabanus May 23 at 5:39
  • Using std::sort() would be better. Because it sorts the numbers with different techniques depending on the numbers you have. However, in both case time complexity is nlogn. – Faruk Hossain May 23 at 5:43
  • I'd say the only valid answer to your question (besides pointing that asymptotical complexities are identical) is to implement both, and benchmark them with your particular data, architecture and implementations. – m.raynal May 23 at 9:41
  • If sorting with a heap were (consistently) faster, then std::sort would just use this method to sort an array. You want to sort, so use the built-in function that sorts. Don't create your own function unless you're absolutely sure the built-in function is too slow, and then you'd need to do a bunch of analysis of your data and code and benchmarking to figure out how to improve on it. – Dukeling May 23 at 10:08
8

Running the following program (with gcc 8.3 on GNU/Linux) gives these results:

100 elements, 2171202 iterations --> v: 1.7s      pq: 2.89572s  (x 1.70337)
1000 elements, 144400 iterations --> v: 3.08776s  pq: 6.75459s  (x 2.18754)
10000 elements, 10816 iterations --> v: 5.24278s  pq: 8.79159s  (x 1.6769)
100000 elements,  841 iterations --> v: 5.06147s  pq: 8.62931s  (x 1.7049)
1000000 elements,  72 iterations --> v: 4.64172s  pq: 9.16332s  (x 1.97412)

Invoking sort() once on a vector seems to be better than using a priority_queue in any case.


/*
  g++ -o prog prog.cpp -O3 -march=native \
      -std=c++17 -pedantic -Wall -Wextra -Wconversion
*/

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <cmath>
#include <vector>
#include <queue>
#include <algorithm>
#include <chrono>
#include <random>

int
get_elem_count(int argc,
               char **argv)
{
  auto elem_count=-1;
  if(argc>1)
  {
    try
    {
      elem_count=std::stoi(argv[1]);
    }
    catch(...)
    {
      // ignore
    }
  }
  return elem_count;
}

std::vector<double>
generate_sequence(int elem_count)
{
  auto gen=std::default_random_engine{std::random_device{}()};
  auto dist=std::uniform_real_distribution<double>{0.0, 1.0};
  auto sequence=std::vector<double>{};
  sequence.reserve(elem_count);
  for(auto i=0; i<elem_count; ++i)
  {
    sequence.emplace_back(dist(gen));
  }
  return sequence;
}

double
current_time()
{
  const auto now{std::chrono::system_clock::now().time_since_epoch()};
  return 1e-6*double(std::chrono::duration_cast
                     <std::chrono::microseconds>(now).count());
}

void
vector_test(const std::vector<double> &sequence,
            std::vector<double> &tested)
{
  //~~~~ consume the sequence and store values ~~~~
  tested.clear();
  for(const auto &elem: sequence)
  {
    tested.emplace_back(elem);
  }
  std::sort(begin(tested), end(tested),
    [](const auto &lhs, const auto &rhs)
    {
      return lhs>rhs;
    });
  //~~~~ make use of the sorted values ~~~~
  auto previous=1.0;
  for(const auto &elem: tested)
  {
    if(elem>previous)
    {
      throw std::runtime_error{"this is just a dummy test (never true) "
                               "in order to prevent the optimizer from "
                               "discarding all the code..."};
    }
    previous=elem;
  }
}

void
priority_queue_test(const std::vector<double> &sequence,
                    std::priority_queue<double> &tested)
{
  //~~~~ consume the sequence and store values ~~~~
  for(const auto &elem: sequence)
  {
    tested.emplace(elem);
  }
  //~~~~ make use of the sorted values ~~~~
  auto previous=1.0;
  while(!empty(tested))
  {
    const auto elem=tested.top();
    tested.pop();
    if(elem>previous)
    {
      throw std::runtime_error{"this is just a dummy test (never true) "
                               "in order to prevent the optimizer from "
                               "discarding all the code..."};
    }
    previous=elem;
  }
}

int
main(int argc,
     char **argv)
{
  const auto elem_count=get_elem_count(argc, argv);
  if(elem_count<=0)
  {
    std::cerr << "usage: " << argv[0] << " iteration_count\n";
    return 1;
  }
  const auto iteration_count=
    int(1'000'000'000.0/(elem_count*std::log(elem_count)));
  const auto generation_count=int(std::sqrt(iteration_count));
  const auto repeat_count=iteration_count/generation_count;
  auto vector_duration=0.0;
  auto priority_queue_duration=0.0;
  for(auto generation=0; generation<generation_count; ++generation)
  {
    const auto sequence=generate_sequence(elem_count);
    auto tested_vector=std::vector<double>{};
    auto tested_priority_queue=std::priority_queue<double>{};
    auto t0=0.0;
    for(auto repeat=0; repeat<repeat_count; ++repeat)
    {
      if(repeat==1) // 0 is a dry run
      {
        t0=current_time();
      }
      vector_test(sequence, tested_vector);
    }
    vector_duration+=current_time()-t0;
    for(auto repeat=0; repeat<repeat_count; ++repeat)
    {
      if(repeat==1) // 0 is a dry run
      {
        t0=current_time();
      }
      priority_queue_test(sequence, tested_priority_queue);
    }
    priority_queue_duration+=current_time()-t0;
  }
  std::cout << elem_count << " elements, "
            << generation_count*repeat_count << " iterations --> "
            << "v: "<< vector_duration << "s  "
            << "pq: "<< priority_queue_duration << "s  "
            << "(x " << priority_queue_duration/vector_duration << ")\n";
  return 0;
}
5

The number of operations in case of the vector approach is:

  1. Inserting n elements = n*O(1) = O(n)
  2. Sorting n elements = O(n*logn)
  3. Iterating over n elements = O(n)

Total = O(n*logn) + 2*O(n) [Ignoring for a second that 2*O(n) ~ O(n)].

The number of operations in case of the heap approach is:

  1. Inserting n elements = n*O(logn) = O(n*logn)
  2. Iterating over n elements = n*O(logn) = O(n*logn)

Total = 2*O(n*logn).

Even though the number of operations is O(n*logn) in both the cases, but by the exact mathematical formula, the difference between the heap and vector case is:

O(Heap) - O(Vector) = 2*O(n*logn) - O(n*logn) - 2*O(n) = O(n*logn) - 2*O(n)

which would be positive for large cases of n:

https://www.desmos.com/calculator/uw4i9oiy19

<iframe src="https://www.desmos.com/calculator/uw4i9oiy19?embed" width="1000px" height="1000px" style="border: 1px solid #ccc" frameborder=0></iframe>

In the above graph, blue is y = x*logx and red is y = 2*x.

So by this analysis, you should go for the vector approach.

  • You could iterate over vector in lg n time by doing a binary search instead of linear, considering that the existing vector is already sorted before inserting new element. – Wander3r May 23 at 5:55
  • @Wander3r Didn't get you. Are you talking about the insertion step or the last iteration step? – Anmol Singh Jaggi May 23 at 5:58
  • Iteration step when inserting a new element – Wander3r May 23 at 5:58
  • 6
    This is a pretty major abuse of big O notation. – Kyle May 23 at 6:53
  • 4
    Big-O ignores constant factors. So O(n*logn) + 2*O(n) is exactly equal to O(n log n) and the only conclusion you can reach from your code is both are O(n log n). This only tells you these algorithms scale at the same rate as n goes to infinity, which means either can still be any amount of time slower than the other for any given value of n. – Dukeling May 23 at 9:50

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