3

I wonder if there's a cheap(performance wise) option to search an index of array element which meets certain criteria starting from an index?

Array.tryFindIndex method doesn't have an argument startIndex. I could do Array.skip(n) and then search there but it seems expensive to create an array just for search. How do I do this?

I looked List also doesn't have that argument. Do I have to use while ... do? Is there a nicer way?

5

The base libraries try to provide functions for your convenience but they cannot possibly anticipate all use cases. Nothing wrong with writing your own if need be:

module Array =
    let tryFindIndexFrom i p (a : _ []) =
        let rec loop k =
            if k >= a.Length then None
            elif p a.[k] then Some k
            else loop (k + 1)
        if i < 0 then None else loop i

EDIT: p is the predicate testing the array elements. tryFindIndexFrom has the same signature as tryFindIndex but with the starting index added as first parameter.

EDIT 2: Added test for k < 0 for fool-proof usage.

EDIT 3: Moved test for k < 0 out of the loop as it needs to be checked only once.

  • Myabe explain that 'p' means predicate i.e. some function that returns true or false. Tthat's my guess . – sashang May 23 at 8:20
  • @sashang: Indeed, p is the predicate testing the array elements. tryFindIndexFrom has the same signature as tryFindIndex but with the starting index added as first parameter. – dumetrulo May 23 at 8:30
  • 1
    If you add an inline after let the F# compiler can sometimes inline the predicate and thus avoid a virtual call. Also sometimes ValueOption<_> is useful to avoid GC pressure. Since OP talked about cheap performance-wise. – Just another metaprogrammer May 23 at 16:25
2

Here's a way to do it using a lazy sequence of array indexes:

let input = [| 'a' .. 'z' |]

seq { 4 .. input.Length - 1 }
|> Seq.tryFind (fun i -> input |> Array.tryItem i = Some 'x')

I'll leave it to you to generalise this into a helper function if you think that's necessary.

The nice thing about the current form is that it's quite flexible. You can change the maximum index easily, or search backwards, e.g. seq { input.Length - 1 .. -1 .. 4 }.

2

Follow your instinct. Considering Array.skip but noting the obvious waste of allocating a second array, you can take it one step further and generalize to the lazily evaluated Seq.skip, compose it with the standard Seq.tryFindIndex function and add the offset, if applicable.

let tryFindIndexMin n p =
    Seq.skip n
    >> Seq.tryFindIndex p
    >> Option.map ((+) n)
// val tryFindIndexMin : n:int -> p:('a -> bool) -> (seq<'a> -> int option)

[ for i in 0..3 ->
    [|"a"; "b"; "a"; "b"|]
    |> tryFindIndexMin i ((=) "a") ]
// val it : int option list = [Some 0; Some 2; Some 2; null]
  • 1
    This method doesn't have to allocate an intermediate array but it does still have to iterate through the n sequence items, which could be the slow part. – TheQuickBrownFox May 25 at 8:42

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