95

I want to read a .csv file in python.

  • I don't know if the file exists.
  • My current solution is below. It feels sloppy to me because the two separate exception tests are awkwardly juxtaposed.

Is there a prettier way to do it?

import csv    
fName = "aFile.csv"

try:
    with open(fName, 'rb') as f:
        reader = csv.reader(f)
        for row in reader:
            pass #do stuff here
    
except IOError:
    print "Could not read file:", fName
4
  • If a non-existing file is not an error case but a likely circumstance then checking for and handling its absence/non-readability explicitly before (and additionally to) the try might be worth it. This can be done with os.path.exists(file) and os.access(file, os.R_OK) respectively. Such check can never be free from a race condition though but vanishing files are seldom a normal circumstance ;) – stefanct Apr 8 '17 at 14:50
  • 2
    The answers to this question should probably be updated to include usage of the pathlib module, which makes this problem a lot easier, and should probably be standard Python practice (especially since it was also backported to 2.7). – Rick supports Monica Jul 3 '17 at 13:56
  • while this catches IOError, it does not catch csv.Errordue to file not being CSV format when Dialect.strict=Trueor Error for any other errors (according to CSV package docs), so an outer try, or just simply checking for file exists, then an inner try for CSV exceptions is probably the right answer. – pink spikyhairman May 28 '20 at 13:41
  • @pinkspikyhairman Yes, In your except handler, you do have to decide which error types you want to handle. See here for how to handle multiple specific types of errors: stackoverflow.com/questions/6470428/… – Charles Holbrow May 29 '20 at 0:42
68

How about this:

try:
    f = open(fname, 'rb')
except OSError:
    print "Could not open/read file:", fname
    sys.exit()

with f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    for row in reader:
        pass #do stuff here
5
  • 11
    The only problem with this is that the file is opened outside of the with block. So if an exception occurs between the try block containing the call to open and the with statement, the file doesn't get closed. In this case, where things are very simple, it's not an obvious issue, but it could still pose a danger when refactoring or otherwise modifying the code. That being said, I don't think there's a better way to do this (other than the original version). – intuited Apr 11 '11 at 21:12
  • 3
    @intuited: That's right. In fact, the final answer to the OP is probably just: No, the way you've done it is the right way. – jscs Apr 11 '11 at 21:20
  • 1
    FileNotFoundError.mro() is [<class 'FileNotFoundError'>, <class 'OSError'>, <class 'Exception'>, <class 'BaseException'>, <class 'object'>] and IOError.mro() is [<class 'OSError'>, <class 'Exception'>, <class 'BaseException'>, <class 'object'>]. How about using either OSError or Exception instead? ``` – hotohoto Oct 28 '19 at 8:25
  • 1
    @hotohoto: Good idea. I'm not sure - perhaps the Exception hierarchy has changed in this regard since 2011, but anyway your suggestion is more encompassing. – Tim Pietzcker Oct 28 '19 at 14:47
  • How about making the "with f:" part of an "else:" clause for the exception? The spoken english version of this would be, "try and open, if error raise error, else do normal processing" Block code samples aren't allowed in comments, so I can't show it. – Ben Slade Apr 6 at 21:16
53

I guess I misunderstood what was being asked. Re-re-reading, it looks like Tim's answer is what you want. Let me just add this, however: if you want to catch an exception from open, then open has to be wrapped in a try. If the call to open is in the header of a with, then the with has to be in a try to catch the exception. There's no way around that.

So the answer is either: "Tim's way" or "No, you're doing it correctly.".


Previous unhelpful answer to which all the comments refer:

import os

if os.path.exists(fName):
   with open(fName, 'rb') as f:
       try:
           # do stuff
       except : # whatever reader errors you care about
           # handle error

10
  • 24
    Just because a file exists doesn't mean that you can read it! – Gabe Apr 11 '11 at 20:59
  • 4
    This isn't perfect, because it is possible that the file gets deleted (e.g. by another process) between checking that it exists and trying to open it. – Liquid_Fire Apr 11 '11 at 20:59
  • Maybe I'm misunderstanding the question. In fact, I think I definitely am. – jscs Apr 11 '11 at 21:00
  • 1
    It's also possible that fName could be the name of some file which, even if it sticks around, cannot be opened for whatever reason — for example, if it is a directory or does not have permissions allowing it to be read by the executing process. – intuited Apr 11 '11 at 21:14
  • 4
    The "if exists(file): open(file)" method could fail because the file could be removed after you check to see that it exists but before you open it. Or it could be locked, or not have read permission, or be some type of object that you can't read (like a directory), or be archived on tape and the tape isn't available, or there could be a disk error trying to open the file, or ... – Gabe Apr 11 '11 at 22:13
20

Here is a read/write example. The with statements insure the close() statement will be called by the file object regardless of whether an exception is thrown. http://effbot.org/zone/python-with-statement.htm

import sys

fIn = 'symbolsIn.csv'
fOut = 'symbolsOut.csv'

try:
   with open(fIn, 'r') as f:
      file_content = f.read()
      print "read file " + fIn
   if not file_content:
      print "no data in file " + fIn
      file_content = "name,phone,address\n"
   with open(fOut, 'w') as dest:
      dest.write(file_content)
      print "wrote file " + fOut
except IOError as e:
   print "I/O error({0}): {1}".format(e.errno, e.strerror)
except: #handle other exceptions such as attribute errors
   print "Unexpected error:", sys.exc_info()[0]
print "done"
1
  • In this case, IOError is obvious but when will general exception occur from code coverage point of view. How can I make a test case to generate a general exception. – Mian Asbat Ahmad Jan 7 at 10:01
2

How about adding an "else" clause to the exception and putting the "with" statement in the "else" section? Like this:

try:
  f = open(fname, 'rb')
except FileNotFoundError:
    print(f"File {fname} not found.  Aborting")
    sys.exit(1)
except OSError:
    print(f"OS error occurred trying to open {fname}")
    sys.exit(1)
except Exception as err:
    print(f"Unexpected error opening {fname} is",repr(err))
    sys.exit(1)  # or replace this with "raise" ?
else:
  with f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    for row in reader:
        pass #do stuff here

Instead of sys.exit(), you could put 'raise' and escalate the error up the chain. It might be better to get system info about the error from the top level error handler.

1
fname = 'filenotfound.txt'
try:
    f = open(fname, 'rb')
except FileNotFoundError:
    print("file {} does not exist".format(fname))

file filenotfound.txt does not exist

exception FileNotFoundError Raised when a file or directory is requested but doesn’t exist. Corresponds to errno ENOENT.

https://docs.python.org/3/library/exceptions.html
This exception does not exist in Python 2.

1
  • 1
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Donald Duck Jun 19 '20 at 17:18
-13

Adding to @Josh's example;

fName = [FILE TO OPEN]
if os.path.exists(fName):
    with open(fName, 'rb') as f:
        #add you code to handle the file contents here.
elif IOError:
    print "Unable to open file: "+str(fName)

This way you can attempt to open the file, but if it doesn't exist (if it raises an IOError), alert the user!

4
  • Not seeing the problem. If it was incorrect syntax it would raise a syntax error when executed! – Zac Brown Apr 11 '11 at 21:22
  • 7
    Not a syntax error, but bool(IOError) is simply True and if doesn't catch any exception. – user395760 Apr 11 '11 at 21:23
  • 9
    >>> if IOError: print "That's not an exception handler" – jscs Apr 11 '11 at 21:25
  • 4
    @Josh Caswell is correct. IOError evaluates to True. docs.python.org/2.4/lib/truth.html – hecvd Jun 29 '16 at 21:40

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