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I could not figure this out, why C++ is not allowing overloading according to the return type as in the following case the three member(getter) function has different function signature and even when to store the pointer to the member function we need different mem-function pointer types like:

for instance T = std::string
using constRefPtr   = const std::string&(MyStruct::*)() const;
using constValuePtr = const std::string(MyStruct::*)() const;
using valuePtr      = std::string(MyStruct::*)() const;

I have read this similar post, where it was suggestion to have const and non-cost member functions.

Question: How could I make the following (getter)overloads work without removing constness of each member functions(if it is possible through standard C++)?

I am using C++17.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

template<typename T> class MyStruct
{
    T m_val;
public: 
    explicit MyStruct(const T& value) 
        : m_val(value)
    {}
    const T& getVal() const {   return m_val; } // get val as const ref(no copy of member)
    const T getVal() const  {   return m_val; } // get a const member as return
    T getVal() const        {   return m_val; } // get a copy of member
};

int main()
{
    MyStruct<std::string> obj{"string"};
    const auto& val_const_ref = obj.getVal();  // overload const std::string& getVal() const
    const auto val_const = obj.getVal();       // overload const std::string getVal()  const
    auto val = obj.getVal();                   // overload std::string getVal()  const
    return 0;
}

error messages I have got:

error C2373 : 'MyStruct<T>::getVal' : redefinition; different type modifiers
note: see declaration of 'MyStruct<T>::getVal'
note: see reference to class template instantiation 'MyStruct<T>' being compiled
error C2059 : syntax error : 'return'
error C2238 : unexpected token(s) preceding ';'
error C2143 : syntax error : missing ';' before '}'
error C2556 : 'const T MyStruct<T>::getVal(void) const' : overloaded function differs only by return type from 'const T &MyStruct<T>::getVal(void) const'
1 > with
1 > [
    1 > T = std::string
        1 > ]
    1 > C:\Z Drive\CPP Programs\Visual Studio Project\Main.cc(62) : note: see declaration of 'MyStruct<std::string>::getVal'
note: see reference to class template instantiation 'MyStruct<std::string>' being compiled
error C2373 : 'MyStruct<std::string>::getVal' : redefinition; different type modifiers
note: see declaration of 'MyStruct<std::string>::getVal'
error C2059 : syntax error : 'return'
error C2238 : unexpected token(s) preceding ';'
error C2146 : syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'T'
error C2530 : 'val_const_ref' : references must be initialized
error C2789 : 'val_const' : an object of const - qualified type must be initialized
note: see declaration of 'val_const'
  • 5
    "the three member(getter) function has different function signature" Except that they don't. Return type is not a part of the signature. See Is the return type part of the function signature? – Yksisarvinen May 23 at 14:22
  • 1
    What difference do you expect with T vs const T as a return type? – Slava May 23 at 14:24
  • 2
    Why do you feel you need three flavors of getVal in the first place? I believe the first one - the one returning const T& - is quite sufficient; you should be able to use it everywhere you think you need the other two. – Igor Tandetnik May 23 at 14:25
  • 1
    @Const no it is not, making result part of signature will create more problems that it would solve (if any). – Slava May 23 at 14:28
  • 1
    @Const first and foremost you have 2 versions of foobar() that are different by result type and one calls them like this foobar(); (ignoring the result), which one should be called? – Slava May 23 at 14:34
2

It is not possible. You cannot overload on return type. Overload resolution takes into account the function signature. A function signature is made up of:

  • function name
  • cv-qualifiers
  • parameter types

The standard says:

1.3.11 signature

the information about a function that participates in overload resolution (13.3): its parameter-type-list (8.3.5) and, if the function is a class member, the cv-qualifiers (if any) on the function itself and the class in which the member function is declared. [...]

(Lightly edited from Luchian Grigore's answer)

5

You just... can't overload on return type, full stop.

You could just make two differently named functions:

T const& ref() const { return m_val; }
T val() const        { return m_val; }

Which themselves could be overloaded based on constness or &ness:

T const& ref() const { return m_val; }
T&       ref()       { return m_val; }

T val() const&       { return m_val; }
T val() &&           { return std::move(m_val); }
  • What do the second overloads stand for? specifically && and const&? – Const May 23 at 14:28
  • They're called ref-qualifiers. – Barry May 23 at 14:29
  • 2
    Can you add example of code showing difference btw val()s? I think that would be helpful – Slava May 23 at 14:29
  • 3
    Or may be do not have trivial getters/setters? Problem solved :) – SergeyA May 23 at 14:30
0

Question: How could I make the following (getter)overloads work without removing constness of each member functions(if it is possible through standard C++)?

Name them appropriately. And as @Slava points out, when return a copied value there no point in distinguishing between T and const T, so something like:

const T& getConstRefVal() const { return m_val; } // get val as const ref(no copy of member)
T        getVal()         const { return m_val; } // get a copy of member
  • What is the point of getVal() vs getConstVal()? – Slava May 23 at 14:25
  • I think part of your question should be explanation that OP does not need that variations. – Slava May 23 at 14:27
  • @Slava Good point, added to answer. – Paul Evans May 23 at 14:29

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