1

is there any .catch() method like there is with Promises for async await style of code?

Here's an example of a code written via Promise:

const apiURL = 'https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1';
const badURL = 'zhttps://wcaf.fajfkajf.gg'

function getData(url){
  fetch(url)
    .then(response => response.json())
    .then(json => console.log(json))
      .catch( err => console.log('cannot load api'))
}
  
getData(apiURL);
getData(badURL);

A simple function to try to load data and if not, display a basic error message. Now I was trying to transcribe this into async/await style code, issue was, I could not really figure out a way to write this with catch()


My best guess was to try try - catch but the catch part doesn't work:

const apiURL = 'https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1';
const badURL = 'zhttps://wcaf.fajfkajf.gg'

async function getData(url){
  const response = await fetch(url);
  try {
     const json = await response.json();
     console.log(json);
  } catch (e) {
     console.log('cannot load api');
  }
}
  
getData(apiURL);
getData(badURL);

This loads the object API just fine, but never seems to go into the catch{} block despite being passed incorrect url.

Any idea what am I doing wrong?

2

As pointed out in the comments by @l-portet, this is because the code inside try { } block does not actually fail!

.json() will return a promise, regardless of the content of the parsed body text, so even though the initial fetch() fails, you can still call .json() on it - albeit it's completely redundant as it won't return anything meaningful.

Putting the fetch() request inside the try { } block does result in the expected behaviour:

const apiURL = 'https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1';
const badURL = 'zhttps://wcaf.fajfkajf.gg'

async function getData(url){
  try {
     const response = await fetch(url);
     const json = await response.json();
     console.log(json);
  } catch (e) {
     console.log('cannot load api');
  }
}
  
getData(apiURL);
getData(badURL);

1

One thing you should be aware is that when an async function is executed, it always returns a promise, regardless the exit condition of the function.

If the function has an explicit return (or completes without crashing) the promise will be resolved to the value it returned (or to undefined if there was no explicit return), if the function throws, the promise will be rejected, passing the thrown error object.

Knowing that you could simply handle the error where you use the function, for example:

const apiURL = 'https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1';
const badURL = 'zhttps://wcaf.fajfkajf.gg'

async function getData(url){
  const response = await fetch(url);
  return await response.json();
}
  
getData(apiURL).then(data => console.log(data));
getData(badURL).catch(err => console.log('error:', err));

IMHO handling the error closely where you have a use-case of the function makes more sense, since normally when you expect to have an error is because we have a way to handle it (maybe try another API url in this example).

One pattern that I've been using lately is to wrap promises in a way they resolve returning a tuple, in the convention of [error, value] (similar to the way the Go programming language handle async error), in that way for instance you could handle the error in the specific getData call, for example:

const apiURL = 'https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1';
const badURL = 'zhttps://wcaf.fajfkajf.gg'

async function getData(url){
  const response = await fetch(url);
  return await response.json();
}

// simple utility function
const safePromise = promise =>
  promise.then(data => [null, data]).catch(err => [err, undefined]);

(async () => {
  const [err, json] = await safePromise(getData(apiURL))
  if (err) {
    // handle the error
  }
  console.log(json)

  const [error, data] = await safePromise(getData(badURL))
  if (error) {
    console.log('Error:', error);
  }
})()

Check the following library which basically ships this pattern:

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